Part time undergraduate degrees

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We now offer a number of our undergraduate degree courses on a part-time basis.

The course structure is the same as for the equivalent full-time courses, and part-time students study individual modules with full-time students. However, instead of studying 120 credits a year for three years, part-time students spread their credits over a period of five or six years, depending on the subject they are studying.

Information about the part-time courses is not included in our online prospectus, and you cannot apply for them via UCAS, so please follow the links below for more information about each course, and links to online application forms.

As more courses are added we will include them on this page

BA / BSc Applied Social Sciences (part-time)

This innovative degree looks to challenge the tradtional social science boundaries by offering an interdisciplinary approach, allowing a flexible pathway and chance to follow your passions. You will also be trained in the key research skills, both quantitative and qualitative to enable you to dig deeper into your choosen subject route.

The interdisciplinary degree is available to study on a part-time basis, which allows you to study the course over six years.

BA Archaeology (part-time)

The BA Archaeology gives you an excellent foundation in all aspects of world archaeology. It allows you to build on this with specialist modules, ranging from ancient Egypt to experimental archaeology. The course is very flexible and any aspiring archaeologist will find a range of optional specialist modules to suit their interests.

As a part-time student, you will study for your BA Archaeology over a period of six years, with each level taking two years to complete.

BA Education, Culture and Childhood (part-time)

The BA Education, Culture and Childhood combines two academic subject areas: Education Studies and Childhood Studies. This allows you to gain a detailed understanding of the themes underpinning current educational policy and practice as well as critically engage with issues surrounding child development and the meaning of childhood.

The degree is also offered on a part-time basis, which allows for the workload to be spread across a period of five years.

BMedSci Health and Human Sciences (part-time)

We'll help you become a confident, caring professional so you're ready for a wide range of career paths in health.

You'll join one of the top schools in the UK for nursing research. The internationally acclaimed research we're doing improves lives and helps shape health care policy and practice. All of these insights feed into your course so you graduate with the most relevant knowledge and skills.

BA History (part-time)

Are you interested in getting a degree in History, but don't want to study full-time? This degree option is for you.

Our BA History, Part-time, is an honours degree programme taught in the Department of History. As a part-time student, you will study for your BA History over a period of six years, with each level taking two years to complete. You will study alongside our full-time students and be able to choose from our full range of modules giving you the opportunity to explore a variety of approaches to the study of history.

BA English Literature (part-time)

The BA in English Literature is one of the most popular degree courses at the University of Sheffield. Students study poetry, prose, fiction, drama and film from the fourteenth to the twenty-first centuries.

The Literature programme has a distinctive mixture of modules, in which all students follow a chronological core supplemented by the study of literary theory and genre. A diverse list of optional approved modules, complementary to the chronological core and driven by staff research expertise, is also available in which students can analyse poetry, contextualise films, study plays or immerse themselves in modern fiction.

BA Philosophy (part-time)

Philosophy is a valuable subject to study.Philosophy looks at fundamental questions, which we’re all likely to have to think about at some time: why do democratic political decisions have particular authority; is euthanasia (or even writing ‘do not resuscitate’ on medical notes) permissible; how should a juror decide whether an accused intended the death of his victim? It is empowering to be familiar with these issues, and to be able to argue in defence of your own views.