Emily BallEmily

Email: gga08eb@sheffield.ac.uk

Research interest: Investigating the use of conditionality mechanisms in family-based interventions

Supervisor: John Flint

Biography

I graduated with a BA in Geography from the University of Sheffield in 2011 with first class honours. I was awarded third prize by the Royal Geography Society Gender and Feminist Geographies Research Group (formerly the Women and Geography Study Group) award for my dissertation exploring the identities of military wives.

Immediately after my degree I completed an MA in Planning and Development in the Department of Town and Regional Planning, also at the University of Sheffield, where I graduated with Distinction. My research for my dissertation looked at the relationship between gender and housing in the Peak District National Park. Before undertaking my PhD at the Department of Town and Regional Planning in September 2013, I had experience working as a researcher in an environmental market research company and as a Teaching Assistant in a primary school.

PhD Research: Investigating the use of conditionality mechanisms in family-based interventions

My PhD is part of an ESRC funded project entitled ‘Welfare Conditionality: Sanctions, Support and Behaviour Change.’ This is a qualitative project exploring the ethicality and efficacy of welfare conditionality and will engage with a range of policy makers, frontline practitioners and service users across England and Scotland over five years.

Click here for more information on the project

My PhD is focusing on the relationship between support and sanctions in family-based interventions. I am using a longitudinal qualitative methodology working with a range of families engaged with different service providers over six months to investigate how the circumstances of families may have changed and how that has been achieved. I am particularly interested in the use of parenting support to achieve this. The research will also consider the gender dimensions of these interventions. The results of the PhD will be useful for practitioners and policy makers in judging what level of conditionality is effective in increasing the opportunities and circumstances of vulnerable families.

My supervisors are Professor John Flint and Elaine Batty.

Conference Presentations

I have given the following conference presentations:

  • Housing Studies Association Annual Conference, April 2014, York - Mechanisms of support and conditionality in intensive family-based interventions: influencing the behaviour change of vulnerable families
  • Housing Studies Association Home in Transition Early Career Researcher Symposium, November 2014, Stirling – Mechanisms of support and conditionality in intensive family-based interventions: influencing the behaviour change of vulnerable families in the context of ‘Home in Transition’
  • Housing Studies Association Annual Conference, April 2015, York - Intensive Family Intervention and the Problem Figuration of ‘Troubled’ Families
  • Social Policy Association, July 2015, Belfast - A ‘gripping’ journey: initial findings and researcher reflections of a longitudinal study investigating different approaches to support vulnerable families

Teaching

  • For the 2014-2014 academic year I contributed to the development of the ‘Student-led Seminars’ programme. The seminars allow undergraduates from all years to discuss national and international planning issues.
  • PhD demonstrator for TRP235 module
  • Facilitator on the State of Sheffield project

Publications

  • Ball, E., Batty, E. and Flint, J. (2015) Intensive Family Intervention and the Problem Figuration of ‘Troubled Families’. Social Policy and Society. Forthcoming 2015.