ACS6101 Foundations of Control Systems

Module Description (subject to change)

This is an introductory module on the foundations of control systems engineering. The aim of this module is to consolidate fundamental control and systems engineering aspects as well as introduce relevant topics to those new in the discipline. The module is separated in four (4) distinct themes:

  1. Introductory Maths and MATLAB
  2. Systems Modelling and Simulation
  3. Control Systems Analysis and Design
  4. Digital Control Systems

Credits: 30 (Autumn semester)

Module Leader

George Panoutsos












Professor George Panoutsos

Email: g.panoutsos@sheffield.ac.uk
Amy Johnson Building

If you have any questions about the module please talk to us during the lectures or the labs in the first instance. It is likely that other students will learn from any questions you ask as well, so don’t be afraid to ask questions.

Outside of lectures please contact one of us via email, or drop in to see one of us.

Other teaching staff

Daniel CocaProfessor Daniel Coca
Email: d.coca@sheffield.ac.uk

If emailing Prof Coca, please also copy in his assistant Rebecca Fieldsend (r.fieldsend@sheffield.ac.uk)

Dr Viktor FedunDr Viktor Fedun
Email: v.fedun@sheffield.ac.uk

 

Dr Lingzhong GuoDr Ling-zhong Guo
Email: l.guo@sheffield.ac.uk
Pam Liversidge Building

 

Anton Selivanov 45pxDr Anton Selivanov
Email: a.selivanov@sheffield.ac.uk

Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the module students will:

  1. Solve problems related to systems and control engineering using advanced mathematical methods. [SM1fl]
  2. Use industrial standard software and hardware to model, analyse, simulate, design and operate control systems. [EP3fl]
  3. Explain the characteristics of numerical simulation methods, their performance as well as their impact on simulation results. [SM1fl, SM3fl]
  4. Analyse and explain the characteristics of engineering systems in the time (continuous and sampled) and frequency domain, and design controllers using classical and modern control techniques. [EA1fl, D1fl, D2fl]
  5. Organise a modelling and simulation workflow, and apply a workflow to address performance questions related to a control system. [SM3fl, EA1fl]
  6. Use industry-relevant simulation software to model the performance of semi-realistic case study control systems. [EA3fl, EP3fl]
  7. Use quantitative and computational methods to augment the properties of a control system in order to meet desired performance specification. [D2fl]

This module satisfies the AHEP3 (Accreditation of Higher Education Programmes, Third Edition) Learning Outcomes that are listed in brackets after each learning outcome above. For further details on AHEP3 Learning Outcomes, see the downloads section of our accreditation webpage.

Syllabus

Syllabus

The module will cover the following themes:

  • Linear algebra, matrices, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Linear differential equations, exp(At), inhomogeneous equations. Canonical form of a linear system. Laplace transforms. Use of MATLAB software, probability, expectation correlation and stochastic process concept.
  • Introduction to the purpose, uses and benefits of system modelling; physical equations of systems; empirical models; first and second order system models and time domain solution; system linearisation; transfer function models; mechanical system models; dc motor models; hydraulic actuator models; system block diagrams; state space models.
  • Digital simulation; numerical integration using Euler, Runge-Kutta methods; continuous simulation languages (MATLAB/SIMULINK); simulation of linear and non-linear dynamic systems.
  • Introduction to control; system models, performance requirements, time-domain characteristics of first and second order systems, Routh's stability criterion, steady state errors.
  • Time-domain and frequency domain analysis. Root locus design method. Bode plots. Polar plots. Open-loop and closed-loop relationships. System stability. Nyquist stability criterion. Gain margin, phase margin, resonance peak, resonant frequency. Bandwidth and cut-off frequency. Transport delay. Lead-lag compensation. PID Control. Computer aided design.
  • Sampling concepts. Analysis of sampling and relationship to z-transforms. Frequency and time-domain analyses of sampled-data systems. PLC and PLC based logic control and design.
Teaching Methods

Learning and Teaching Methods

NOTE: This summary of teaching methods is representative of a normal Semester. Owing to the ongoing disruption from Covid-19, the exact method of delivery will be different in 2020/21.

  • Lectures/Tutorials: 72 hours
  • Computing/CACSD Laboratory: 24 hours
  • PC Lab: 20 hours
  • Independent study: 184 hours
Teaching Materials

Learning and Teaching Materials

All teaching materials will be available via Blackboard (MOLE).

Assessment

Assessment

This module is assessed by coursework only.

Assignment 1: 50%

Assignment 2: 25%

Assignment 3: 25%

Feedback

Feedback

Students will get feedback on their work throughout the module, for example through feedback sheets on the lab exercises and assignments, grades on Blackboard (MOLE) assessment and written individualised feedback via the TurnItIn system.

Students will also be invited to 1-to-1 verbal feedback sessions.

Student Evaluation

Student Evaluation

Students are encouraged to provide feedback during the module direct to the lecturer. Students will also have the opportunity to provide formal feedback via the Faculty of Engineering Student Evaluation Survey at the end of the module.

You can view the latest Department response to the survey feedback here.

Recommended Reading

Recommended Reading

Peripheral reading:

  • Banks S P, 1986, Control systems engineering, Prentice-Hall [available in Information Commons, 629.83 (B)]
  • Biran, A and Breiner, M, 2002, MATLAB for Engineers, Addison-Wesley, Hall [available in Information Commons, 620.002855362 (B)]
  • Bissell C C, 1994, Control Engineering, Van Nostrand, 2nd Ed, [available in Information Commons, 629.8

Week 1

Core Text:

  • Hahn, D.B and Valentine, D.T, 2010, Essential MATLAB for Engineers and Scientists, Academic Press, ISBN-978-0123748836 [available in Information Commons, 620.002855362 (H)]
  • Nyhoff, L., and Leestma, S.1996, FORTRAN 77 for engineers and scientists, with an introduction to Fortran 90, Prentice Hall Modular Series for Engineering, ISBN-978-0135052150 [available in Information Commons, 005.113 (Fortran N)]

Secondary Text:

  • Stroud, K. A, 2013, Engineering Mathematics, Palgrave Seventh edition / with Booth, D. J [available in Information Commons, 510.2462 (S)]

Week 2

Core Text:

  • Dorf R. C. and Bishop R. H., Modern Control Systems, 9th Ed., Prentice Hall, 2001

Secondary Text:

  • Close C. M.; Frederick D. K and Newell J. C., 2002, Modelling and analysis of dynamic systems, 3rd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, [available in Information Commons, 003.3 (C)]
  • Hung V. V. and Esfandiari R. S., 1998, Dynamic systems: modelling and analysis, McGraw-Hill

Week 4

Core Text:

  • Dorf R. C. and Bishop R. H., Modern Control Systems, 9th Ed., Prentice Hall, 2001
Secondary Text:
  • Ogata, K, 1997, Modern Control Engineering, Prentice-Hall (3rd Ed),

Week 5

Core Text:

  • Dorf R. C. and Bishop R. H., Modern Control Systems, 9th Ed., Prentice Hall, 2001

Secondary Text:

  • Astrom, K.J and Wittenmark, B, 1997 Computer Controlled Systems: Theory and Design, Prentice Hall (3rd Ed)
  • Floyd, T.L, 2009, Digital Fundamentals, Pearson (10th Ed), [available in Information Commons, 621.3815 (F)]
  • Kuo, B. C, 1992, Digital control systems, (2nd Ed), Saunders College Publishing, Fort Worth, [available in Information Commons, 629.895 (K)]
  • Lathi, B.P, 2010, Linear Systems and Signals, International Second Edition, Oxford University Press