PhD Studentship opportunities in Archaeology

The Department of Archaeology is pleased to announce three new funded PhD studentships for 2016.

Snowdonia's fieldscapes

Bob Johnston has been awarded an AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Award for 'Snowdonia's Early Fieldscapes' to be held in collaboration with Snowdonia National Park. The project will enable a student to undertake doctoral research and gain professional work-based experience in landscape archaeology and the conservation of historic environments. The student will research the prehistoric and Roman ‘fieldscapes’ (comprising field boundaries and associated stock enclosures and settlements) of northwest Wales. The research will transform the understanding of early fieldscapes within Snowdonia. For the first time it will give a clear indication of their potential extent and cohesion, which will make it possible to manage threats from agricultural improvement and vegetation encroachment. It will provide a deeper understanding of the organisation of societies and their landscapes during later prehistory into the Roman period.

Deadline for applications: Monday 2 May 2016 (midnight).

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Snowdonia's fieldscapes

Coastal landscapes in North Wales

Bob Johnston will also be supervising a NERC-funded PhD project, ‘A multi-proxy investigation of Late Holocene coastal landscapes in North Wales’. This project will be jointly supervised by the Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield, and the Environment Department, University of York. It is funded by the NERC ‘Adapting to the Challenges of a Changing Environment’ Doctoral Training Partnership. Looking to the past to understand the future, the student will use a mix of palaeoenvironmental and archaeological prospection methods to model the impact of climate change on the coastal heritage of Wales. The research will generate the first reliable model of how the coastline of northwest Wales changed during the Late Holocene. It will use this knowledge to build models for the sustainable management of the region’s important coastal cultural heritage. Using a case study of known high potential in the Dysynni Valley, Gwynedd, the student will analyse diatoms in sediment cores to establish a record of sea-level change, use archaeological geophysics and remote sensing to characterise the region’s cultural heritage, and generate a GIS predictive model of zones of high heritage value and indices of susceptibility to future environmental change.


More about postgraduate research in the Department of Archaeology can be found here
http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/archaeology/postgraduate_research

Coastal landscapes in North Wales

Entropy calculation to help understand societal change

Roger Doonan has been awarded a studentship from the Grantham Centre for Sustainable Futures on 'Entropy as a framework for understanding coupling between the natural and engineered world', to be held jointly with the Physics department. This project seeks to employ the archaeological and historical data for the comparative investigation of energy use in different societies. The project lies at the interfaces between physics, archaeology and ecology and it will be addressed by developing models to calculate entropy generation rates within the case study systems. Entropy generation (as opposed to energy use) allows the “quality” or “usefulness” of different energy resources to be measured. We will explore how we might calculate entropy generation in a series of sub-systems coupled with the environment with the aim of learning about the conditions of social change. A critical aspect of the study should be the development of methods and models that provide baseline data for both the critical analysis of existing studies and to inform current and emerging policy decisions about the future of our planet.

Deadline for applications: Monday 7 March, 2016
https://www.findaphd.com/search/ProjectDetails.aspx?PJID=72348

Entropy calculation to help understand societal change