Home Front Legacy in South Yorkshire

The University of Sheffield is collaborating with the Council for British Archaeology and other partners to host one of a series of regional conferences about the First World War. The aims of the conference, which will be held at the ​​Humanities Research Institute on 12th September 2015, are to showcase recent research in Yorkshire and to encourage more local groups to get involved. Sue Wright of the CBA says "There is a huge amount of research still to be done into the archaeology of the Home Front and groups of enthusiasts with local knowledge have an important role to play. The University of Sheffield has a distinguished track record of working with others to investigate our First World War heritage and we are pleased to be working with them."


The Department of Archaeology has recently been collaborating with the Department of Lifelong Learning to investigate some of the most enigmatic features that make up the extensive WWI training landscape at Redmires near Sheffield. Slight earthworks are scattered over a huge expanse of inhospitable moorland on the edge of the Peak District National Park, while the site of a hutted camp not far away is now partly covered by a dense plantation. Although some of the earthworks clearly represent classic trench systems, others are less easy to interpret. "We've mapped some of the earthworks in exhaustive detail and conducted geophysical surveys as well, but to be honest we still have no idea exactly what purpose some of the military features served" says Al Oswald, Associate Teacher in Landscape Archaeology, who is leading the project for the Department of Archaeology. "It's both frustrating and instructive, given that they're barely a century old".

Burned barbed wire, found at Redmires Camp

Burned barbed wire, found at Redmires Camp