Louis Olivier Lortie

Department of Archaeology

Research Student

Thesis- Material Economies of South Yorkshire in the first and early second century AD: The organisation of metal production in Roman South Yorkshire

llortie1@shef.ac.uk

Full contact details

Louis Olivier Lortie
Department of Archaeology
Minalloy House
Regent Street
Sheffield
S10 2TN
Qualifications
  • 2014- MA Material Culture Studies – University of Sheffield (Distinction)
    • Dissertation- Romanisation Process and Production Modes in Wytch Farm, Dorset
  • 2012- BA Archéologie – Université Laval

MA Dissertation

This project aimed to document the ways by which one can investigate social changes through the study of technology.

To reach this aim, I characterised the variations in the technology of metal working, using macroscopical, microscopical and chemical analysis, and investigated the related production modes between the late Iron Age and the Roman period in the region of Poole Harbour in Dorset.

Simultaneously, I tried to characterise the variations possibly caused by the Roman conquest, as well as the extent and effect of their influence and control over the various industries of the area.

 

Research interests

Thesis- Material Economies of South Yorkshire in the first and early second century AD: The organisation of metal production in Roman South Yorkshire

I am interested in the relationships between craft communities and the control exerted on these crafts and/or communities by elites, external powers or neither. Also, more broadly, I am concerned by metals as a material class, ceramics and the frontiers of the Roman Empire.


Thesis Abstract

The metropolitan county of South Yorkshire was for more or less 20 years part of the northern frontier of the Roman Empire. It was home to a number of forts as part of a suggested defensive line that ran between the Humber and Severn.

Regardless of this, the region has not been studied to its full potential. Many assemblages are yet to be studied with a fresh modern eye and the creation of regional models, even temporary or local ones, is not common.

This thesis will aim to do just that. Using metallurgical assemblage’s studies, and the analytical tool that is ArcGIS, I will attempt to create a model of the economy of metals, from the acquisition of the resources to the consumption of the finished goods, in South Yorkshire during the early centuries of the Roman occupation of the region'

The completion of this research will hopefully bring new discussion on the unicity of South Yorkshire in Britain and in the Roman World, as well as produce a basis on which to work for further research in the area.