Samantha GarwoodGarwood

email: segarwood1@sheffield.ac.uk

PhD Title

Christian and Muslim interactions in the Post-Medieval Adriatic: an examination of cultural and economic exchange through the analysis of the glass cargoes from shipwreck assemblages

Abstract

The aim of this project is to analyse glass assemblages recovered from 16th and 17th century shipwrecks in the Adriatic as a means of furthering the broader discussion about trade and exchange between religiously and culturally diverse groups in this region during the Early Modern period. Glass from the well-studied Gnalić wreck, along with the wrecks of twelve other merchant ships off the eastern coast of the Adriatic (Gluščević 2006: 10), forms the core of this study, focusing specifically on glass vessels, mirrors, windows, and beads. These artefacts are compared typologically with objects excavated from settlements both along the coast and in the hinterland, the goal being to ascertain the provenances of these wreck cargos, the functions of individual objects within these assemblages, and their intended destinations. In doing so, this data creates an additional medium through with to examine cultural exchange between Venice, the Ottoman Empire, and various Christian, Muslim, and Jewish populations which acted as producers, consumers, and trade intermediaries.
In the case of the Gnalić wreck, the variable quality (from crudely made, simple beakers to diamond engraved tazze) and wide array of types and styles of vessels (including styles colours which were more typically Islamic or Central European) is suggestive of more than one destination and possibly more than one origin for this cargo (Lazar and Willmott 2006). A previously published wreck at Koločep has also presented unusual, and typically non-Venetian, glass alongside more typical Venetian goods (Radić Rossi 2006). Whether or not the rest of the shipwrecks in this study reveal similarly mixed cargos, by identifying the provenance and destination of the goods, this thesis will greatly add to what is known about trade patterns in this region, and how the diverse groups which were involved in this trade interacted with each other.

Qualifications

Qualifications

BA History (Bard College 2009)
MA European Historical Archaeology: Distinction (The University of Sheffield 2012)

Awards

Awards

The Patricia Phillips Award (2012)
University of Sheffield Faculty Scholarship for PhD (2013)