Sofia Tecce

Sofia Tecce

Supervisers: Dr Umberto Albarella and Dr Gianna Ayala

email: s.tecce@sheffield.ac.uk

Profile

Biography

I obtained my first degree in the Universidad de Buenos Aires, in Argentina (Licentiate in Anthropology with orientation in Archaeology). During this time I had my initial training in zooarchaeological research with Mariana De Nigris, focusing my research in Patagonian hunter-gatherer animal exploitation and consumption practices in the past. After obtaining my degree, I decided to broaden and consolidate my knowledge of animal and human bones research by doing the MSc in Osteoarchaeology in the University of Sheffield, which I completed with distinction. My MSc dissertation focused on the study of animal and bird bone remains from the medieval site of Thornton Abbey (North Lincolnshire) and was supervised by Umberto Albarella.

Research

Research

Since completing my MSc course in 2013, I continued to participate in research and activities in the University as a member of the zooarchaeology team at the Department of Archaeology. I have also continued working on various Sheffield-based projects in collaboration with other team members.

For my PhD, I am working on a project entitled "The origins and evolution of pig domestication in Italy: a regional and diachronic study", supervised by Umberto Albarella and co-supervised by Gianna Ayala. The main aim of this project is to contribute to the understanding of the origins of pig domestication in prehistoric Italy and to address a vacuum in the research of this essential aspect of the development of past human societies. To date the subject of pig husbandry in Europe has mainly been limited to archaeological studies at small geographical and temporal scales, thus masking the inherent complexities of the process. In Italy, only recently studies on pig domestication on a wider regional and chronological context, based on large amounts of data, have been attempted. So far previous archaeological and genetic research on Italian prehistoric sites suggests that the domestication of the pig has likely involved a mixture of introduced and local domestication, but there are many more areas that are in need of greater clarification and to which this project will contribute.

I look forward to continue my research and studies in the Department of Archaeology of the University of Sheffield for the next three years.