MODULE DESCRIPTION 2017-18

AUTUMN SEMESTER 15 CREDITS
AAP6073 CURRENT ISSUES IN AEGEAN PREHISTORY
CO-ORDINATOR: SUE SHERRATT
OTHER TUTORS: PAUL HALSTEAD, PETER DAY

 MODULE OUTLINE

 This course comprises a series of 2-hour seminars, chaired in turn by student participants and providing the opportunity to discuss major themes pertaining to the Aegean world, based on suggested reading. The principal focus is later prehistory (Neolithic-Early Iron Age), but topics exploit ethnographic and historical sources, as well as archaeological.


BROAD ACADEMIC AIMS AND PRINCIPLES OF THE UNIT

This unit aims to:
• Introduce students to key current debates in Aegean prehistory, ranging from the earliest farming communities of the Neolithic to the palatial societies of the later Bronze Age
• Encourage critical examination of the models and methods used by Aegean prehistorians
• Develop students’ skills in leading and contributing to seminar discussions


MEASUREABLE LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this module students should be able to demonstrate and understanding of:
• Have a broad understanding of current debates in Aegean prehistory and of broad diachronic and regional trends in the development of human societies in the Aegean between the early 7th and early 1st millennia BC
• Have a critical understanding of how effectively Aegean prehistorians have applied relevant data and investigative methods to explore their chosen research questions
• Understand how study of the modern Aegean may inform study of the distant past in this area
• Be better able to formulate a suitable approach and relevant design for future research at MA and/or PhD dissertation level


EXAMPLES OF LECTURE/SEMINAR TITLES

Our seminars are highly participative and taught by leaders in their field.
• The ‘origins’ of Minoan and Mycenaean palaces.
• The ‘functions’ of Minoan and Mycenaean palaces.
• Neolithic society and economy.
• Production, consumption and power in the Early Bronze Age.
• Trade and exchange in the Aegean and Mediterranean.
• Texts and taxation in the Bronze Age.
• Gods and ancestors: memory, tradition and legitimation.
• Material culture and ethnicity.


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT SKILLS ACQUIRED

  • Working with ideas - ability to think creatively and critically about the questions posed and solutions thereto considered in the course of the module
  • Researching - ability to evaluate critically and to use productively published sources of information.
  • Working with different data-sets - ability to use the differences between data-sets to generate significant insights
  • Data collection and analysis - ability to recognise the strengths/limitations of different methods/techniques of data capture and analysis and to evaluate critically the flaws and biases in diverse data sets and to assess their relevance to particular questions.
  • Team working - ability to contribute effectively to, and organise, group work
  • Communication Skills - communicating complex ideas and data sets with clarity both orally and in writing

STUDENT ATTENDANCE AND INDEPENDENT STUDY

Type Hours
Seminars 17
Independent Study (including preparation for assessments) 133

ASSESSMENT

Method % of marks Hours/Length
Essay 33% 1000 words
Essay 67%  2000 words