MODULE DESCRIPTION 2017-18

SPRING SEMESTER 15 CREDITS
AAP6082 EXPERIMENTAL ARCHAEOLOGY
CO-ORDINATOR: ROGER DOONAN
OTHER TUTORS:

MODULE OUTLINE

This module provides students with a theoretical and practical knowledge of experimental approaches and the diverse role it fulfils within wider archaeological practice. Major trends and developments in the experimental archaeology are addressed with a focus on the historical role of experimental archaeology. Future research pathways for experimental approaches are identified and their role for informing some of the emerging syntheses within material culture studies. The module has a high practical content with students expected to work in groups..


BROAD ACADEMIC AIMS AND PRINCIPLES OF THE UNIT

This unit aims to:

  • provide students with a theoretical knowledge of experimental archaeology and the practical skills necessary to undertake a programme of experimental archaeology
  • provide students with the practical skills and theoretical knowledge necessary to undertake a campaign of experimental archaeology
  • show how experimental reconstruction relates to wider archaeological practice
  • critically evaluate the historical development of experimental archaeology
  • foster an appreciation of the central importance of experimental approaches
  • provide an framework for how experimental archaeology can be united with contemporary theoretical concerns so as to influence emerging syntheses within material culture studies and archaeology more widely.

MEASUREABLE LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this module students should be able to demonstrate:

Knowledge and understanding of experimental archaeology in the following ways

  • an understanding of the key issues surrounding the use of experimental archaeology
  • an appreciation of what are appropriate methods for utilising archaeological and experimental observations
  • how to use theoretical knowledge in the design of experimental simulations and reconstructions
  • critical awareness with regards to the possibilities and limitations of experimental archaeology
  • an understanding of how to assess and marshal evidence from experimental work

Skills in the following areas

  • the practical skills associated with handling archaeological and experimental materials
  • the practical skills associated with conducting experimental campaigns
  • critical evaluation of experimental designs

EXAMPLES OF LECTURE/SEMINAR TITLES/TUTORIALS

Our lectures/seminars are highly participative and taught by leaders in their field.

  • Analogy in Archaeology
  • Experimental Archaeology: Making and breaking rules
  • Models of perception and the senses
  • Experiencing Experiments-Objectivity and subjectivity in archaeological reconstruction
  • Experimental data and model building

STUDENT ATTENDANCE AND INDEPENDENT STUDY

Type

Hours

Lectures 10
Seminars 2
Field Work 16
Independent Study (including preparation for assessments) 132

ASSESSMENT

Method

% of marks

Hours/Length

Report 100%