MODULE DESCRIPTION 2016-17

SPRING SEMESTER 15 CREDITS
AAP6138 ETHNOGRAPHY IN ARCHAEOLOGY
CO-ORDINATOR: PETER DAY
OTHER TUTORS: UMBERTO ALBARELLA, ROGER DOONAN, PAUL HALSTEAD, KEVIN KUYKENDALL

MODULE OUTLINE

Archaeologists have always used their knowledge of the present in viewing the past. This course examines the role of ethnographic studies as a source of analogies in archaeological interpretation. It will investigate a range of methodologies from generalizing ethnoarchaeology through contextual studies of specific societies. It examines the influence of colonial pasts, nation building and understandings of the modern world in investigating the material conditions of human life.


BROAD ACADEMIC AIMS AND PRINCIPLES OF THE UNIT

This unit aims to:
Explore the analogical basis of archaeological reasoning, providing students with an awareness of the role of ethnographic studies of the present and recent past. Through a range of examples of ethnographic studies, including film, to illustrate the importance of the observation of living societies to aid the examination of material remains of the past.


MEASUREABLE LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this module students should be able:

  • To demonstrate a critical awareness of the developing role played by ethnographic evidence in archaeological interpretation.
  • To understand the colonial context of much early ethnographic evidence, as well as the political use of ethnographic studies in nation building.
  • To demonstrate an understanding of the material conditions of human action in a variety of contexts.
  • To view social and economic links and contrasts between modern capitalist societies and those of the past
  • To identify ways in which ethnographic evidence might be integrated into archaeological research design to answer a range of key questions.

EXAMPLES OF LECTURE/SEMINAR TITLES/TUTORIALS

  • Our lectures/seminars are highly participative and taught by leaders in their field.
  • Ethnography and the role of analogy in archaeology
  • Ethnoarchaeology: measuring the present to reveal the past
  • Colonialism and origins of ethnography
  • Ethnography and nation building
  • Observing agricultural systems
  • Ethnographies of the modern world
  • Building a fence with Lemonnier: ethnographies of the mundane
  • Ethnographies of archaeological practice

STUDENT ATTENDANCE AND INDEPENDENT STUDY

Type

Hours

Lectures 16
Independent Study (including preparation for assessments) 134

ASSESSMENT

Method

% of marks

Hours/Length

Essay 100% 3000 words