MODULE DESCRIPTION 2017-18

AUTUMN SEMESTER 15 CREDITS
AAP647 RECONSTRUCTING ANCIENT TECHNOLOGIES: METALS
CO-ORDINATOR: ROGER DOONAN
OTHER TUTORS:

MODULE OUTLINE

This module provides students with the theoretical frameworks and practical skills necessary to undertake the study of archaeological metals and related materials. The course unites theoretical concerns, scientific methods and experiential practice in the study of ancient and historical metallurgical traditions.


BROAD ACADEMIC AIMS AND PRINCIPLES OF THE UNIT

This unit aims to:

  • Aims provide students with the practical skills and theoretical knowledge necessary to undertake an archaeometallurgical study
  • show how archaeometallurgical approaches can be used to address significant archaeological questions.
  • critically evaluate the historical development of how metal using communities have been studied.
  • foster an appreciation of the central importance of experimental techniques in the study of ancient metallurgy.
  • provide an framework for how scientific techniques can be united with contemporary theoretical concerns so as to influence emerging syntheses within material culture studies and archaeology in the historic and prehistoric periods.

MEASUREABLE LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this module students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of :

  • have acquired an understanding of the fundamentals of ferrous and non-ferrous production metallurgy
  • be aware of theoretical and scientific approaches to the study of archaeological metals and related materials
  • be capable of assessing the potential of a metallurgical assemblage and designing a research protocol for its study
  • be capable of designing a campaign of experimental archaeology related to primary or secondary metallurgical production
  • be able to critically assess archaeometallurgical research with reference to key literature

EXAMPLES OF LECTURE/SEMINAR TITLES/TUTORIALS

Our lectures/seminars are highly participative and taught by leaders in their field.

  • Resource perception and the world of minerals: Ancient and historic mining
  • Pulling swords from stones: From mineral to metal-smelting and other processes
  • Metals and social complexity: Archaeological approaches to metal-using communities
  • Provenance and Process: A critical review of scientific studies
  • Practical’s in assessment of metalworking assemblages, experimental archaeometallurgy, analytical approaches, archaeometallurgical models and technological change.

STUDENT ATTENDANCE AND INDEPENDENT STUDY

Type

Hours

Lectures 12
Seminars 2
Fieldwork 4
Independent Study (including preparation for assessments) 123

ASSESSMENT

Method

% of marks

Hours/Length

Laboratory work 100%