MODULE DESCRIPTION 2017-2018


AUTUMN SEMESTER 20 CREDITS



AAP115 EMERGING EUROPE: FROM STORAGE TO STONEHENGE AND STATES



CO-ORDINATOR: COLIN MERRONY

OTHER TUTORS: LIZZIE CRAIG-ATKINS, PETER DAY, ROGER DOONAN, CAROLINE JACKSON, SUE SHERRATT


MODULE OUTLINE

'Emerging Europe' explores debates concerning the spread of the 'Neolithic package' of crops, livestock and farming to Europe; the subsequent development of European society from first farming villages to the early states and literate civilisations of Bronze Age southern Greece; and the associated developments in lithic, ceramic and metallurgical technology. The module also provides an introduction to the wide range of materials and methods that archaeologists use to study the past. The practical laboratory-based classes provide 'hands-on' experience in basic identification, observation, recording and interpretation of archaeological evidence. The lectures contextualise these practical sessions by illustrating how information generated in the laboratory contributes to understanding of early human history.


BROAD ACADEMIC AIMS AND PRINCIPLES OF THE UNIT

• Introduce debates on the spread of farming across Europe and the related development of storage and property
• Explore the development of European society from the beginning of farming to the emergence of the first states at the dawn of history.
• Explore developments in lithic and ceramic technology, metallurgy and writing in Neolithic-Early Iron Age Europe.
• Introduce the materials and techniques used by archaeologists in studying the past.
• Enable students to develop basic core skills of observation, identification, descriptive recording, analysis and interpretation of archaeological evidence.


MEASUREABLE LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this module students should be able to demonstrate:
• a basic knowledge of debates on the development of farming, storage and property in SW Asia and their spread across Europe.
• a basic knowledge of the development of European society from the beginning of farming to the emergence of the first states at the dawn of history.
• a basic knowledge of developments in lithic and ceramic technology, metallurgy and writing in Neolithic-Early Iron Age Europe.
• a basic knowledge of the materials and techniques used by archaeologists in studying the past.
• basic core skills of observation, identification, descriptive recording, analysis and interpretation of archaeological evidence.


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT SKILLS ACQUIRED

• Ability critically to evaluate complex ideas
• Ability to observe and record variables in material remains relevant to understanding the human past
• Understanding of the central role of present-day observations in studying the human past
• Critical awareness of the need to assess material data sets in terms of their formation processes and their relevance to particular research questions


STUDENT ATTENDANCE AND INDEPENDENT STUDY

Type Hours
Lectures / Seminars 15
Field / Laboratory 10
Independent Study (including preparation for assessments) 175

ASSESSMENT

Method % of marks Length / words
Portfolio of Practical Exercises 50%
Multiple Choice Examination 50% 1.5 hours

EXAMPLE LECTURE/SEMINAR TITLES

THE DOMESTICATION OF EUROPE

  • From foraging to farming in Europe
  • Neo-lithic: procurement, exchange and working of stone
  • The Neolithic: social life in clay
  • Who are Europeans? farming, genes and language
  • Stonehenge in context: early monument building in northwest Europe
  • Late Neolithic Europe: marginal colonisation and the ‘Secondary Products Revolution’
  • Practical: Putting flesh on bones – humans and other animals
  • The Ice Man: biology & biography
  • Practical: Cereal evolution and crop processing

BRONZE AGE EUROPE; TRADE, WAR, WEALTH, HIERARCHY?

  • Bling: The Copper Age
  • Practical: Illustrating artefacts: lithics
  • Argonauts of the Aegean: the Early Bronze Age Cyclades
  • Practical: Pottery: identification and description
  • Mycenaeans: from Homer’s heroes to redistribution
  • Practical: Metals
  • Mycenae, and temperate Europe

EUROPE AT THE DAWN OF HISTORY

  • Light from the east: Phoenicians and Greeks, 1100-600 BC
  • The West Mediterranean Iron Age: Etruscans and Iberians 1000-600 BC
  • Hallstatt and La Tène: Iron Age Central Europe 750-400 BC