MODULE DESCRIPTION 2017-2018


AUTUMN SEMESTER 20 CREDITS



AAP116 TOWARDS MODERNITY: ANTHROPOLOGY, ARCHAEOLOGY & COLONIALISM



CO-ORDINATOR: COLIN MERRONY

OTHER TUTORS: LIZZIE CRAIG-ATKINS, JOHN MORELAND, SUE SHERRATT, HUGH WILLMOTT


MODULE OUTLINE

This module explores how anthropology and archaeology developed in early modern Europe, and how this development was shaped by, and mirrored, the cultural and political history of Europe, through the Renaissance, Reformation and especially European colonial expansion into other continents. Anthropology and archaeology developed to explore European encounters with the ‘other’ cultures of distant places and times. These disciplines have widely served to legitimise European exploitation of other continents and to promote particular groups and causes within Europe, but latterly have also critiqued such trends.


BROAD ACADEMIC AIMS AND PRINCIPLES OF THE UNIT

• Introduce the emergence of anthropology and archaeology within the historical context of Europe’s development towards modernity.
• Explore how these disciplines have also helped to shape the history of Europe and its changing relationship with the rest of the world.
• Outline the developing intellectual relationship between anthropology and archaeology.
• Present some of the classic ethnographic studies that have shaped both anthropological and archaeological understanding of human society.


MEASUREABLE LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this module students should be able to demonstrate:
• the historical context of the development of anthropology and archaeology.
• the relevance of anthropology and archaeology to the past, present and future development of human society.
• the reflexive relationship between the development of anthropology and archaeology.
• some classic ethnographic studies that have shaped both anthropological and archaeological thinking on human society.


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT SKILLS ACQUIRED

• Ability critically to evaluate complex ideas
• Ability to evaluate the reliability and relevance of alternative library- and internet-based sources of information
• Ability to present arguments clearly in writing
• Understanding of the role of political, cultural and disciplinary history in shaping the questions, methods and answers of contemporary academia


STUDENT ATTENDANCE AND INDEPENDENT STUDY

Type Hours
Lectures 20
Tutorials 4
Independent Study (including preparation for assessments) 176


ASSESSMENT

Method % of marks Length / words
Three Essays 50% 1000
Multiple Choice Examination 50% 1.5 hours


EXAMPLE LECTURE/SEMINAR TITLES

  • INTRODUCTION: EUROPEAN EXPANSION & THE DISCOVERY OF CULTURAL DIVERSITY LECTURE
  • GERMS, GUNS, WEEDS & WILDERNESS: EUROPEAN (ECOLOGICAL) IMPERIALISM LECTURE
  • TRANSITION: MEDIEVAL CHRISTENDOM, REFORMATION & RENAISSANCE LECTURE
  • HISTORY & LEGEND: THE BIBLE & HOMER LECTURE
  • THE CABINET OF CURIOSITIES, THE FIRST MUSEUMS AND THE THREE AGE SYSTEM LECTURE
  • SOCIAL EVOLUTION: MORGAN, TYLOR, MARX & SERVICE LECTURE
  • ANTHROPOLOGY IN THE PACIFIC: FROM CAPTAIN COOK TO MALINOWSKI, MAUSS & SAHLINS LECTURE
  • ANTHROPOLOGY IN THE NEW WORLD: FROM BOAS TO LÉVI-STRAUSS LECTURE
  • BANDS: AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINES & THE KALAHARI !KUNG LECTURE
  • TRIBES: HIGHLAND NEW GUINEA LECTURE
  • CHIEFDOMS: HAWAII & THE AMERICAN NORTHWEST COAST LECTURE
  • ANTHROPOLOGY & THE ‘NEW ARCHAEOLOGY’ LECTURE
  • CHANGE: CATACLYSMS, REVOLUTIONS & EVOLUTION LECTURE
  • COLONIAL ARCHAEOLOGY LECTURE
  • THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF SLAVERY LECTURE
  • POST-COLONIAL ARCHAEOLOGY LECTURE
  • ARCHAEOLOGY, FOLKLORE & NATIONALISM: MODERN GREECE LECTURE
  • CONTESTED CULTURAL HERITAGE: KENNEWICK MAN & THE DRUIDS LECTURE
  • ARCHAEOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY IN THE FRONT LINE: INVESTIGATING WAR CRIMES LECTURE
  • PUBLIC & COMMUNITY ARCHAEOLOGY LECTURE