MODULE DESCRIPTION 2017-2018


AUTUMN SEMESTER 20 CREDITS



AAP3009 EGYPT IN THE AGE OF THE EMPIRE



CO-ORDINATOR: CAROLINE JACKSON
OTHER TUTORS: COLIN MERRONY


MODULE OUTLINE

This module provides the student with a detailed knowledge of the archaeology of Dynastic Egypt during the New Kingdom, between 16th and 11th centuries BC (18th - 20th Dynasties). The module embeds Egypt in its late prehistoric Mediterranean and Near Eastern context and traces the development of Egyptian society, Dynastic rule and its relationship with its neighbours. The module will use archaeological, textual and scientific evidence to explore how ideology, belief, genetic lineages and conflict shape society.


BROAD ACADEMIC AIMS AND PRINCIPLES OF THE UNIT

By the end of this module students will be able to:
● acquaint students with the major issues in the archaeology of New Kingdom Egypt and its relations with the Aegean, Hittite, Mitanni and Near Eastern superpowers;
● introduce students to the range of methods and theoretical approaches applied to Egyptian archaeology and enable them to understand the changing perspectives within the subject;
● integrate and use current scientific evidence to explore the debates on culture, society and economy in this prosperous and dynamic period in the history of Egypt
● ensure that students understand the place of Egypt within the diversity and complexity of the Mediterranean and Near East in the Late Bronze Age;
● introduce students to debates, issues and key themes in Egyptian archaeology through case studies.


MEASUREABLE LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of the module students should:
● have an in depth knowledge of the methodological and theoretical approaches to Egyptian archaeology
● have an understanding of the culture sequence and main characteristics of the period
● have a detailed knowledge of the complexity of Egypt and its relations, particularly with regard to the neighbouring `superpowers’
● understand the nature of the evidence available for investigating New Kingdom Egypt and the strengths and weaknesses of different forms of evidence (documentary, epigraphic, archaeological, ethnographic, scientific)
● be able to assess primary data of different types.
● understand and reflect critically upon the apparent contradictions or agreement between the written record and the archaeological record for the period; in particular, be able to use scientific evidence to interpret the archaeological record and analyse and reflect critically upon the range of interpretations available.


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT SKILLS ACQUIRED

Ability to critically evaluate scientific evidence and theoretical interpretations; ability to critically evaluate and synthesise information from published sources; participating in seminars and practical exercises; ability to investigate the archaeology through the assimilation of scientific and experimental data; reflective assessment.


STUDENT ATTENDANCE AND INDEPENDENT STUDY

Type Hours
Lectures 12
Seminars / presentations 4
Practicals / workshops 2
Field Trip 6
Independent/Group Study (including preparation for assessments) 176


ASSESSMENT

Method % of marks Length / words
Mid Term 40% 1500
End of Term 60% 3000


EXAMPLE LECTURE/SEMINAR TITLES

  • Chronology, dates and background to Egyptian history
  • Religion and belief
  • Religion and art
  • The 18th dynasty: Akhenaten, Nefertiti and Tutankhamun
  • Researching identity
  • The nineteenth and twentieth dynasties: The Ramesside period
  • Language and writing, exploring hieroglyphs
  • Investigating urbanism - geophysical and topographic survey in an arid landscape Surveying the land
  • Everyday lives – Walk like an Egyptian
  • Examining the environment
  • Technology and the organisation of industry
  • Experiment and ethnography
  • Internationalism, trade and the rise of the superpowers (Egypt and her neighbours)