MODULE DESCRIPTION 2017-2018


SPRING SEMESTER 20 CREDITS



AAP324 ROME: CAPITAL, HINTERLAND AND PERIPHERY



CO-ORDINATOR: MAUREEN CARROLL
OTHER TUTORS:


MODULE OUTLINE

This unit provides the student with a detailed knowledge of the archaeology of the Roman Empire, from the city of Rome to settlements in Italy and other regions of Europe. The module embeds Rome in its later prehistoric Italian and Mediterranean context and traces the creation and development of the city of Rome as a cosmopolis. It also explores the transformation of towns in Italy, the Mediterranean and Europe in emulation of Rome. The module investigates and discusses the profound changes in society from Republic to Empire, the political and economic culture of Empire, and the visual and material expression of imperial ideology. The dialogue between the living and the dead and its cultural and social implications for Rome also will be examined.


BROAD ACADEMIC AIMS AND PRINCIPLES OF THE UNIT

• evaluate different types of archaeological and historical evidence;
• integrate this varied evidence in a theoretically informed manner;
• explore a range of themes related to Rome and its place within the Roman empire;
• discuss the ideological, political and cultural development of Rome and explore the implications thereof on provincial societies;
• investigate the economic and cultural interaction of Rome with its near and distant neighbours.


MEASUREABLE LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this module students should be able to demonstrate:
Students will gain a detailed knowledge of the diversity of Roman culture and its expression in Italy, the Mediterranean and Europe. The module is designed to enable students to assess primary data of different types (artefactual, pictorial, documentary, epigraphic, scientific), based on an understanding of formation processes and cultural practices as well as the limitations of archaeological evidence. Students will engage with a range of methods and theoretical approaches applied in Roman archaeology enabling them to understand the changing perspectives within the subject. Students will gain a detailed knowledge of the archaeology of Roman sites and monuments, as exemplified in a selection of case studies, and they will learn to analyse and reflect critically upon a range of interpretations of archaeological and historical evidence.


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT SKILLS ACQUIRED

Ability to critically evaluate archaeological and historical evidence and theoretical interpretations; ability to critically synthesise published information; participating in group discussion and presentation skills.


STUDENT ATTENDANCE AND INDEPENDENT STUDY

Type Hours
Lectures 16
Seminars 4
Independent/Group Study (including preparation for assessments) 180


ASSESSMENT

Method % of marks Length / words
Mid Term 40% 1500
End of Term 60% 3000


EXAMPLE LECTURE/SEMINAR TITLES

  • Republican Rome in Mediterranean context
  • Society, architecture and power in the city of Rome
  • Rome in the Empire, the Empire in Rome; and seminar
  • Becoming Roman in Italy: Pompeii and Herculaneum as case studies
  • Death and Burial in Rome
  • Imperial Cult and Imperial Benefaction: Case studies in Italy and the provinces
  • “Here is brought from every land and sea”: Trade, ports and caravan routes
  • All roads lead to Rome? The archaeology of communication, travel and pilgrimage