MODULE DESCRIPTION 2017-2018


SPRING SEMESTER 20 CREDITS



AAP389 EXPERIMENTAL ARCHAEOLOGY



CO-ORDINATOR: ROGER DOONAN
OTHER TUTORS:


MODULE OUTLINE

This unit provides students with a theoretical and practical knowledge of experimental reconstruction and the diverse role it fulfils within wider archaeological practice. Major trends and developments in the study of craft, architecture and site formation are discussed with a focus on the historical role of experimental reconstruction. The module critically reviews current practice and explores possibilities for future practice. The module has a high practical content and students can be expected to engage in team projects.


BROAD ACADEMIC AIMS AND PRINCIPLES OF THE UNIT

• provide students with a theoretical knowledge of experimental archaeology and how it is has developed.
• provide students with the practical skills and knowledge necessary to undertake a campaign of experimental archaeology;
• show how experimental reconstruction relates to wider archaeological practice;
• critically evaluate the historical development of experimental archaeology;
• foster an appreciation of the central importance of experimental techniques in archaeology.
• provide a framework for how experimental archaeology can be united with contemporary theoretical concerns so as to influence emerging syntheses within archaeology.


MEASUREABLE LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this module students should be able to demonstrate:
• an understanding of the key issues surrounding the use of experimental archaeology;
• an appreciation of the appropriate methods for making experimental observations;
• how to use theoretical knowledge in the design of experimental simulations and reconstructions;
• critical awareness with regards to the possibilities and limitations of experimental archaeology;
• an understanding of how to assess and marshal evidence from experimental work.
• the practical skills associated with handling experimental materials;
• the practical skills associated with conducting experimental reconstruction;
• identifying key types of archaeological material


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT SKILLS ACQUIRED

Ability to plan and present research projects; recording, analysing and critically evaluating research data; practical skills in interpreting scientific data; developing a good knowledge of scientific methods used in experimental archaeology


STUDENT ATTENDANCE AND INDEPENDENT STUDY

Type Hours
Lectures 11
Practicals 15
Independent/Group Study (including preparation for assessments) 174


ASSESSMENT

Method % of marks Length / words
Mid Term Assignment 40% 1500
End of Term Assignment 60% 3000


EXAMPLE LECTURE/SEMINAR TITLES

  • An introduction to experimental archaeology and analogy
  • Making and breaking rules: The nature of experiment
  • Experiencing Experiments; Reconciling the subjective
  • Growing, Building and making
  • Practicals
  • Interpreting experiments