Bethany James

Bethany’s MBiomedSci year allowed her to be fully involved within the lab, working alongside academics and PhD students throughout her project which inspired her to pursue a career in scientific research. Following graduation, Bethany will continue working as a Research Technician in the same lab where she completed her 4th year project, with a view to pursuing a PhD in the future.

Bethany James

Degree: MBiomedSci Biomedical Science

Graduate role: Research Technician, the University of Sheffield

“When I applied for Biomedical Science at the university I chose the MBiomedSci over the BSc as it would provide me with further opportunity to develop my laboratory skills and to be more involved in the upcoming research at the university. During my third year I completed a six week laboratory project with Dr Anestis Tsakiridis working with a stem cell model of spinal development. I thoroughly enjoyed my time in the laboratory and was keen to continue the work I had started. The fourth year of the MBiomedSci course has allowed me to extend this project further.

“At the start of my final year I completed a literature review to allow me to compose a research proposal for the project. This was then practically applied in the laboratory where I investigated the effect of Notch signalling on the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into neuromesodermal progenitors and their derivatives of the neural and mesodermal spinal cord. The final project most importantly allowed me to experience being fully involved in the laboratory with weekly laboratory meetings and working alongside other members of the laboratory team. Through this project I have discovered that the inhibition of Notch signalling may bias the differentiation of neuromesodermal progenitors towards neural progeny leading to a deficiency in mesodermal progenitors that form the spinal skeleton. This may be linked to the truncated and disorganised spinal phenotypes seen in mouse mutants of the Notch pathway. However, further studies could be developed on from this to help us understand the different roles signalling factors play during neuromesodermal differentiation.


When I applied for Biomedical Science at the university I chose the MBiomedSci over the BSc as it would provide me with further opportunity to develop my laboratory skills and to be more involved in the upcoming research at the university.

Bethany James

MBiomedSci Biomedical Science


“In addition to my work in the laboratory, in my final year I completed modules in Ethics, Law and Public Awareness of Science and Critical Analysis of Science providing an in depth understanding of the principles important for the publication of scientific research. The fourth year also allows the opportunity to be involved in laboratory demonstrating, providing training in Small Group Teaching and in assessment and feedback. These modules have allowed me to prepare poster presentations, debates and essays which I have found valuable for developing a confidence in both public speaking and communicating scientific ideas.

“Now I have completed my studies I will be continuing to work in Dr Anestis Tsakiridis’ laboratory as a research technician. As part of this job role I will be supporting PhD students with their research in the laboratory as well as continuing my own research linked to the work I completed during my final year project. My ambition after this role is to complete PhD and to continue in scientific research allowing me to contribute to the publication of new innovative scientific ideas. Therefore, completing an integrated master’s in biomedical science has not only given me a good foundation and vital experience for working within the laboratory but inspired me to continue a career in scientific research.”