Biomedical Science with a Year Abroad






BSc

UCAS Code: B901
Typical offer:
AAA
Length:
Four years

International students
Don't meet our
entry requirements? 
Foundation Years at our International College


Thinking about Biomedical Science? Our students Sally, Kate, Emily and Rachel provide a whistle-stop tour of the department.

How to apply for this course

Other biomedical science degrees:

About the course

Our degree programme is based around a mixture of compulsory modules covering the subjects that every biomedical scientist needs to know, and options that allow you to focus on the subjects that interest you most. On the Year Abroad course, you'll spend your third year studying biomedical science at a top institution in another part of the world. You'll also have the freedom within your overseas programme to study subjects outside biology.

The first and second years of the degree covers the basic concepts and skills that biomedicine is based on, including cell and molecular biology, genetics, physiology, anatomy, developmental biology, neuroscience and systems biology. As you progress in the degree, you'll do more laboratory work, including human anatomical dissection classes in second year.

In your third year you will study at a foreign partner university selected at the beginning of year 2. You will have freedom to select from the biomedical science related classes offered by your host university [subject to local restrictions] as well as an opportunity to take other courses, experience the culture of their host country and travel.

On your return your fourth year will closely mirror the third year of students on the standard Biomedical Science degree. You will be able to choose one of four specialist routes and complete a 12-week research project, which can be based inside or outside the lab.

Throughout the degree, you will have lectures on the latest developments in biomedical research, and tutorials to help you develop literature searching, analysis, communication and teamwork skills. You'll write reports and present your findings as you become an independent, critical thinker. This helps to give you lots of skills that you can put on your CV, which employers within and beyond science are looking for.

Assessments in first year:
Written and practical examinations – 67%
Coursework including oral presentations – 33%

Second year: Exams – 80%, coursework – 20%
Third year: Exams – 70%, coursework – 30%
Fourth year: Exams – 30%, coursework – 70%

Structure and content

Below are some examples of topics covered in this degree from the current academic year. There may be some changes before you start your course.






First year
Core lectures and practicals cover:

  • Neuroscience
  • Cell Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Pathobiology
  • Physiology and Pharmacology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Laboratory Skills in Biomedical Science

Second year
Core lectures and practicals cover:

  • Integrated Physiology and Pharmacology
  • Building Nervous Systems
  • Advanced Developmental Biology
  • Cell and Molecular Biology
  • Career Development Skills


Optional lectures and practicals cover:

  • Introduction to Human Anatomy – includes supervised human dissection
  • Communicating Bioscience
  • Physiology at the Extremes

Third Year
Study in one of over 40 potential partner Universities where you can select from Biomedical Science related courses as well as having the opportunity to take other courses and experience the local culture.

Forth year
Students choose one of the following specialist routes:

Physiology with Pharmacology

This route allows students to focus on human physiology and pathophysiology, working from the level of the gene, protein, cell and organ to the whole body. Modules also cover the effects of drugs on physiological function in health and disease.

Typical core modules:

  • Molecular physiology of ion channels and disease
  • Pharmacological techniques
  • Membrane receptors
  • Epithelial physiology

Example optional modules:

  • Biological basis of brain disease: neurodegeneration
  • Cancer biology
  • Stem cell biology
  • Modelling human disease
Neuroscience

This route allows students to focus on the development and function of the human nervous system. Modules cover the role of genes and proteins in neuronal growth and differentiation, and also their role in neuronal signalling and function.

Typical core modules:

  • Molecular physiology of ion channels and disease
  • Autonomic nervous system
  • Techniques in neuroscience
  • Developmental neurobiology

Example optional modules:

  • The kidney in health and disease
  • Membrane trafficking
  • Cancer biology
  • Nuclear structure and function
Developmental and Cell Biology

This route allows students to focus on the development of the human body and the role cellular and molecular mechanisms play in this process. Modules cover areas such as cell-cell signalling and the regulation of gene expression.

Typical core modules:

  • Stem cell biology
  • Modelling human disease
  • Practical cell biology
  • Membrane trafficking

Example optional modules:

  • Human tissues
  • Membrane receptors
  • Autonomic nervous system
  • Biological basis of brain disease: neurodegeneration
Medical Science

This route allows students to gain a broad understanding of biomedical science. Students complete advanced anatomical dissection (core) and select from a variety of optional lectures modules.

Typical core module:

  • Forensic anatomy

Example optional modules:

  • Autonomic nervous system
  • Epithelial physiology
  • Human tissues
  • Stem cell biology

Students also complete a project in third year, which can be based inside or outside the lab. Lab-based projects are on a topic from your chosen specialism. Examples of projects outside the lab include:

  • extended library projects for those who want to enhance their scientific knowledge and presentation skills
  • 'Patients as Educators' projects for students who want to discuss clinical conditions with volunteer patients
  • local schools projects for students who want to gain experience of teaching





The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it's up-to-date and relevant. Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research, funding changes, professional accreditation requirements, student or employer feedback, outcomes of reviews, and variations in staff or student numbers.