Frequently asked questions

Browse questions and answers for staff and students.

If you can't find the information you need, email us at: eu@sheffield.ac.uk

Health and Wellbeing

We appreciate that the uncertainty of Brexit may have an impact on your health and wellbeing and would like to make staff aware of the support available via Staff Wellbeing. Please visit our dedicated Staff Wellbeing pages for more information.


For staff

Current and prospective staff

Female with laptop


Immigration

What does Brexit mean for my status as an EU/EEA EFTA member of staff (current or prospective)?

If you are an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen and arrived in the UK before 31 December 2020, you can apply to the EU Settlement Scheme. Following a successful application you will be given either 'pre-settled status' or 'settled status', depending on the length of your continuous residence in the UK. This will enable you to continue to live and work in the UK.

The deadline for applications is 30 June 2021. It is free to apply for the EU Settlement Scheme and our HR team can support you through the process. Please see the HR team’s EU Settlement Scheme FAQs for more information.

Find out more about the EU Settlement Scheme on the government web pages.

Further help for staff members

If you are a member of staff at the University or looking to work here please view the international staff web pages for information on key issues such as the EU Settlement Scheme and other immigration and employment-related matters.

If you are looking for advice about immigration, your status or your family’s status, the University offers a range of services to support you. Including:

  • A legal helpline hosted by immigration specialists Eversheds. Please contact eu@sheffield.ac.uk to book an appointment.
  • One-to-one sessions with a University HR adviser to discuss personal circumstances, which can also be booked by sending an email to eu@sheffield.ac.uk.
  • Information sessions led by immigration experts. Information about previous and upcoming sessions is available on the international staff web pages.
  • You can also send an email to eu@sheffield.ac.uk for any other Brexit-related queries you may have.

You can also make an appointment to get your or your family's ID documents scanned and verified at:

Howden House
1 Union Street
Sheffield
S1 2SH
Email: customerservices@sheffield.gov.uk

More information about government document scanning locations

Find out more about support for non-UK EU staff

Browse questions on the EU Settlement Scheme


Research

What does Brexit mean for research funding from the EU?

Researchers should continue to apply for funding from the EU.

UK scientists, researchers and businesses can continue to participate in Horizon 2020 programmes and receive EU grant funding for the lifetime of individual projects. This includes projects finishing after 1 January 2021. Successful UK bids will continue to receive grant funding from the Commission. This includes calls that end after 1 January 2021.

Following the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement agreed in December 2020, it was announced that the UK will associate to Horizon Europe. This is the EU research and innovation programme which is the successor to Horizon 2020. It is due to run from 2021 to 2027 with a proposed budget of over €80 billion.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement sets out the key principles for UK participation in Horizon Europe, with a draft UK-EU protocol needing to be rubber-stamped after the programme has been agreed by the EU. It is hoped that this will happen in time for the opening of the first Horizon Europe calls, which is anticipated in April 2021.

This means that UK-based researchers would be able to participate in all parts of Horizon Europe (with some very limited exceptions) and would be able to apply for and receive EU funding from these programmes in the same way as when the UK was a member state.

The UK will continue to have a role in four other EU programmes, namely the Euratom nuclear research programme, the ITER project to build the world’s first functioning nuclear fusion system, the earth monitoring project Copernicus, and EU satellite surveillance and tracking services. In the absence of defence cooperation, the UK will not have access to Galileo encrypted military data.

UKRI’s web pages have further information on the implications for research.

Universities UK International has produced a briefing with further information.

If you have any questions about research and Brexit you can contact eu@sheffield.ac.uk


Travel


Is my EHIC still valid?

A European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) gives you the right to access state-provided healthcare during a temporary stay in the EU at a reduced cost or, in many cases free of charge until your planned return home.

The EHIC will soon be replaced with a new UK Global Health Insurance Card (GHIC). If you already have a valid EHIC then this can still be used in the EU until it expires. Once your EHIC has expired, you will be able to replace it with a GHIC.

The NHS has country guides to healthcare in other countries inside and outside the European Economic Area (EEA).

The University’s Brexit Insurance & Travel Advice web page offers advice on the insurance and travel following the end of the transition period on the 31 December 2020.

For personal travel we would recommend buying your own travel insurance to ensure you can access appropriate healthcare treatment.


Erasmus+ and the Turing Scheme

Will Erasmus+ continue?

With the announcement of the trade deal between the UK and the EU, the UK government has confirmed that it is not seeking to participate in the new Erasmus programme cycle. The Department for Education announced on 26 December 2020 that it will be launching a domestic alternative, the Turing Scheme, which will provide funding for placements and exchanges starting in September 2021. Details of the announcement can be found here.

Although the transition period has now ended, the University still has an active Erasmus+ project which is due to conclude at the end of the 2021/22 academic year. Any students currently abroad or due to go abroad this academic year through the Erasmus+ programme will not be affected by this change.

It also means that the University is still able to send and receive exchange students in the 2021/22 academic year. Students due to go abroad in the 2021/22 academic year can and should continue to apply for exchanges at advertised destinations. 

Global Engagement is exploring how the University can continue to work with our European partners in the future and will work closely with faculties, departments and other stakeholders in the coming months to secure and enhance overseas opportunities for our students.

The University’s Global Opportunities web pages have further information on Erasmus+ and Brexit for exchange students coming to the University of Sheffield from other countries in the EU/EEA and for students going from the University of Sheffield to another university in the EU/EEA.

What is the Turing Scheme?

The Department for Education has released further details on the Turing Scheme, the new scheme set to replace Erasmus+. This information can be found on the new Turing Scheme website.

Further information will be shared with departments.


EU - Importing/Exporting

Does the University have an EORI (Economic Operator Registration and Identification) number for importing goods from the EU or exporting to the EU?

Yes, Please see the University's finance page for the EORI number. You will need your University log-in to access this information.

For students

Current and prospective students

Jessop West


Immigration

What does Brexit mean for my status as an EU/EEA EFTA student?

We welcome students from all over the world, and will continue to support students from the rest of the EU to apply to study here. 

Arrived in the UK by 31 December 2020

If you are an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen and arrived in the UK before 11.00pm on 31 December 2020, you can apply before 30 June 2021 to have ongoing legal status to live in the UK through the EU Settlement Scheme. Following a successful application you will be given either 'pre-settled status' or 'settled status', depending on the length of your continuous residence in the UK.

It is free to apply for the EU Settlement Scheme and you can find out more information on the Student Services Information Desk webpage.

You can also find further details about the EU Settlement Scheme on the government web pages.

If you are a current student or starting your course in the 2020/21 academic year you will also continue to receive financial support for study for the duration of your course; you would still need to meet eligibility requirements for student finance, including the residency requirements.

Arrived in the UK after 31 December 2020

If you arrived, or will be arriving in the UK after 11pm on 31 December 2020, and you are studying for more than 6 months, you will need to obtain a visa under the student visa route. The Student Services Information Desk has more detailed information on the student visa route.

If you arrived, or will be arriving in the UK after 11pm on 31 December 2020, but you will be studying in the UK for 6 months or less, you can come to the UK as a visitor to do this. The Student Services Information Desk has more detailed information on using a Visitor Visa for study.

As an EU/EEA EFTA student, will I be able to stay in the UK after completing my studies?

Arrived in the UK by 31 December 2020

If you arrived in the UK before 11.00pm on 31 December 2020 and successfully apply to the EU Settlement Scheme then you will be able to stay in the UK after completing your studies

If you arrived in the UK before 11.00pm 31 December 2020, you can apply before 30 June 2021 to have ongoing legal status to live in the UK through the EU Settlement Scheme. Following a successful application you will be given either 'pre-settled status' or 'settled status', depending on the length of your continuous residence in the UK.

It is free to apply for the EU Settlement Scheme and you can find out more information on the Student Services Information Desk webpage.

Arrived in the UK after 31 December 2020

The UK Government has announced a new Graduate Immigration Route, which will be launched in summer 2021. This route will provide international students with the opportunity to stay in the UK to live and work, or to look for work, after they graduate.

Undergraduate and masters degree students will be able to apply to stay for two years. PhD students will be able to apply to stay for three years.

There is currently limited information about the new graduate work visa, but the Student Services Information Desk has more information on what is known so far.

Where can I go for more help?

The UK Council for International Student Affairs (UKCISA) has information for students on Brexit on its website.

If you are a student with dependants, please contact the Student Advice Centre. Students without dependants can contact International Student Support.

After reading the information above, if you have specific questions about immigration, for you or your family, please email advice@sheffield.ac.uk to make an appointment.

What is Sheffield's view of international students?

We are an international university, and we all benefit greatly from a diverse student population. We will continue to offer a place of welcome to scholars and students from across the continent and the world.

Sheffield has a strong reputation as a diverse, vibrant and friendly city. This will not change.

Our students from around the world celebrate their own cultures and friendships in many ways, participate in volunteering activities and enjoy festivals and sports in the city centre and our beautiful Peak District National Park.

In return the city is deeply grateful for the investment and vibrancy our international students bring. They see our students training to be architects, lawyers and engineers. They see the contribution you make to our hospitals as doctors, and they know that you go on to serve the world in wonderful and important ways after graduation – taking something of Sheffield with you into the wider world.

Will I be able to work in the UK while being a student? (non-UK EU/EEA EFTA students)

Arrived in the UK by 31 December 2020

If you arrived in the UK before 31 December 2020, you can apply to the EU Settlement Scheme. Following a successful application you will be given either 'pre-settled status' or 'settled status', depending on the length of your continuous residence in the UK. This provides ongoing legal status to remain living, studying and working in the UK after the transition period.

It is free to apply for the EU Settlement Scheme and you can find out more information on the Student Services information Desk webpage.

Arrived in the UK after 31 December 2020

If you arrived, or will be arriving in the UK after 11pm on 31 December 2020 and you are studying for more than six months, you will need to obtain a visa under the student visa route.

Whether you can work while studying will depend on the level of study and your sponsoring institution, you may be able to take up part time work in the UK alongside your studies. The UK Government has published information for EU students who want to study in the UK from 2021, which includes information on the new student route and working.


Fees and loans

What does this mean for my fees and access to student loans?

Courses starting in 2020/21 or earlier

EU students starting university in the 2020/21 academic year or earlier are eligible for home fee status for the duration of their course in England.

This means you will be charged the same tuition fees as UK students for the duration of the course.

EU students starting university in the 2020/21 academic year will remain eligible for undergraduate and postgraduate financial support.

Courses starting in 2021/22 or later

The Government has stated that EU, other EEA and Swiss nationals will no longer be eligible for home fee status, undergraduate, postgraduate and advanced learner financial support from Student Finance England for courses starting in academic year 2021/22.

The Department for Education has published new eligibility rules for home fee status and student finance for the 2021 to 2022 academic year. This includes that you will generally be eligible for home fee status, tuition fee and maintenance support if you have been granted settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme and been ordinarily resident in the UK and Islands for at least 3 years. Irish citizens are automatically treated as settled in the UK and do not need to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme to benefit from these rights.

The UK Council for International Student Affairs (UKCISA) website looks at some of the outstanding issues about fee status eligibility and student finance entitlement for the 2021/22 academic year onwards, especially for those who are starting in autumn 2021.


Qualifications

Will EU countries recognise my qualification?

British universities are widely recognised around the world and there are various recognition agreements between countries, many of which are not related to the European Union.

But from 1 January 2021, in order to have your UK professional qualifications recognised for work in an EU country in a number of regulated and other professions you would need to apply to the host country for recognition. Read further information from the UK government. Information from the EU information on where to apply is available here.


European exchange programmes

I have a compulsory period abroad in a European country as part of my course. What does this mean for me?

We would like to reassure you that we are committed to continuing our student exchanges with Europe after Brexit and will work to ensure that all students with a compulsory period abroad in Europe can complete this part of their course. We will make sure we keep you up to date with any changes that might impact on your studies and that we will support you in every way possible to achieve your academic goals. We also have exchange agreements with non-European partner universities and these will not be impacted by Brexit.

Will Erasmus+ continue?

The University of Sheffield highly values its partnerships with European universities and is committed to continuing our exchanges post-Brexit. As the UK has left the European Union with a negotiated deal, the University will continue to participate in the Erasmus+ programme until the end of our current project, in 2022.

The University’s Erasmus+ web pages have further information on Erasmus+ and Brexit for exchange students coming to the University of Sheffield from other countries in the EU/EEA and for students going from the University of Sheffield to another university in the EU/EEA.

The government has confirmed that the UK will no longer be participating in the Erasmus+ scheme and is instead launching a domestic alternative, the Turing Scheme, which will provide funding for placements and exchanges starting in September 2021. Current Erasmus+ projects will continue, including those where funding runs beyond 2020 and the end of the transition period.

I am planning to go to the University of Sheffield on exchange, how does Brexit affect me?

The University of Sheffield will be able to continue with European exchanges as normal in the 2021/22 academic year. The application cycle for 2021/22 will open on 01 March, and we look forward to welcoming exchange students in the next academic year.

The University’s Erasmus+ web pages have further information on Erasmus+ and Brexit for exchange students coming to the University of Sheffield from other countries in the EU/EEA and for students going from the University of Sheffield to another university in the EU/EEA.

We intend to continue our student exchange agreements with our European partner institutions after Brexit and, therefore, will still accept incoming exchange students from other European countries. Your home institution will be able to advise on the selection process, and the availability of funding.

If you have further questions about Erasmus+ and Brexit (for example as a UK student, or a future incoming Erasmus student or Erasmus partner) please contact our Erasmus+ team: globalopps@sheffield.ac.uk.


Travel

Is my EHIC still valid?

A European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) gives you the right to access state-provided healthcare during a temporary stay in the EU at a reduced cost or, in many cases free of charge until your planned return home.

The EHIC will soon be replaced with a new UK Global Health Insurance Card (GHIC). If you already have a valid EHIC then this can still be used in the EU until it expires. Once your EHIC has expired, you will be able to replace it with a GHIC.

The NHS has country guides to healthcare in other countries inside and outside the European Economic Area (EEA).

Please note that there may be differing advice for student travel dependent on whether you are a UK national and when or where you are travelling or have travelled to. Please check the advice on the NHS webpages.

The University’s Brexit Insurance & Travel Advice web page offers advice on the possible insurance and travel implications following the end of the transition period on the 31 December 2020.

For personal travel we would recommend buying your own travel insurance to ensure you can access appropriate healthcare treatment.

Information on these pages is accurate to the best of the University's knowledge and based on advice from the UK government and national bodies for universities. However, we reserve the right to update and amend information as we seek further clarification on questions arising from Brexit.