Health and Human Sciences

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There are lots of starting points for choosing a career and using your subject is just one of them. You are not restricted to the career ideas below and you may wish to consider additional factors which are important to you for your future career using our Understand yourself and your options section.

Remember too that the vast majority of graduate jobs are open to graduates of any subject and so your options are much broader than the examples given below.

Firstly, have a think about what ‘using your subject’ means to you and what you’re really looking for. Do you want to apply your subject-specific knowledge or skills to the real world? Or maybe you want to continue to practice and develop these skills? Maybe it’s a broader interest in your subject that you want to keep alive by working in a relevant type of organisation?

Using your subject can help provide you with some focus for your career research, but the broader your interests the more career options you will have open to you. Use our resources below to stimulate your thinking.

Generating career ideas with Health and Human Sciences

Using the resources below you can start to create your own list of career ideas to research

  • Look at what alumni from your department have done using the DLHE data we collect and through the University of Sheffield alumni page on LinkedIn.
  • Search for and contact alumni in your subject through our Graduate case studies database.
  • Browse the career ideas for Health and Human Sciences graduates on Prospects and TargetJobs but keep in mind that these are not a comprehensive list of all the careers related to your subject.
  • Brainstorm ideas and do some initial investigation to find out about research, organisations, start ups, government bodies and freelancers connected to your subject. Our Information resources - Occupations section is a good place to start.

Some career ideas for Health and Human Sciences graduates

The BMedSci Health and Human Sciences degree will prepare you for a wide range of possible careers. Some graduates undertake further postgraduate study that enables them to become qualified health professionals (such as nurses, midwives, radiographers, occupational therapists etc), others are interested in clinical research or PhD study, whilst some choose to work in the NHS, charity or voluntary sector in managerial and administrative roles.

NHS management

Management roles may be in a wide variety of sectors such as general management , health analysis, health informatics, HR, Finance or estates. Within the NHS, management roles may be secured by applying for schemes such as the NHS Graduate Management Training Scheme which recruits graduates nationally from any degree discipline with a 2.2 or via graduate management training schemes run by individual NHS Trusts.

Project management and administration within the NHS

Direct entry roles are a very common route for working within the NHS. Project management, coordinator and other administration related vacancies are advertised throughout the year via the NHS Jobs website. Roles are varied and could include include coordinating administrative or customer services within a hospital or Trust. Project managing new policies or strategies or the introduction of new services. A typical route into roles such as these would be through working in an assistant or administrative level role initially to develop the relevant experience.

Private healthcare management

Opportunities to work within the private healthcare sector in management or administrative roles are advertised via the organisation’s website and speculative applications are encouraged, there are no formal graduate training schemes offered in the private healthcare sector. As a manager in the private health sector roles are varied as they are within the NHS and could be within general management, customer and patient services, finance, HR, Policy and Strategy.

Health education/promotion

Job titles are varied; wellbeing coordinator,project coordinator, support worker , advice worker and health promotion specialist.
Working within health education/promotion the focus is to improve the public’s health and well being. This may involve working in the NHS, charity, voluntary or third sector to work on the implementation of national public health campaigns or working on a local or community level health issues related to a specific part of the community e.g. sexual health education with young people or cancer screening with a particular demographic. Working in health education/ training may involve working on one to one and group basis with clients , liaising with other health professionals and developing and implementing campaigns. Excellent interpersonal skills, empathy, ability to deal with conflict and strong organisational skills are required in such roles.

Allied Health professions such as nursing, occupational therapy, physician associate

Upon completion of further study (masters level) graduates enter occupations in a variety of allied health professions. In order to develop relevant work experience before continuing with further study a number of graduates will work in caring roles , as support workers and within other related social care settings for a short period of time before applying for/undertaking further study.

Nursing

Training to become a nurse as a graduate will involve undertaking a postgraduate degree in one of four types of nursing: adult, child, mental health or learning disability. Nurses are mainly employed by the NHS in hospital and community settings and also within the private sector.

Subject specific resources