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Results 1 to 15 of 20 in Resonance.

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    Kitchen chemistry: Deep-frying crisps

    Crisps are a British favourite. But just what chemical and physical factors affect the crunch and flavour of these golden wonders?

    Categorised under: Resonance and Features

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    Q+A: Professor Graham Leggett, Head of Department

    Graham Leggett, Professor of Nanoscale Analytical Science and an academic member of staff in the Department of Chemistry for 16 years, was named Head of Department in August 2018. We found some free time amongst the new Head's busy schedule to talk to him about his new role.

    Categorised under: Resonance and Features

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    The Hope Diamond: Solving the Mystery

    In the mid-17th century, an exceedingly rare diamond, coveted for its unusual blue lustre and its expansive size, came into the possession of King Louis XIV of France. Known as the French Blue, it displayed a characteristic heart shape cut. However, during the French Revolution, the contents of the royal vault were ransacked, and though almost all the other jewels were reclaimed, the French Blue was never found.

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  • Q+A: The Lord Porter Ultrafast Laser Laboratory

    Last year, the University of Sheffield's new facility for ultrafast laser spectroscopy was opened by Lady Porter in honour of her late husband George, a Nobel Prize winner and former lecturer in our department. Abbie Sinclair interviewed Professor Julia Weinstein to find out more about why she set up this laboratory, and what it will be used for.

    Categorised under: Resonance and Features

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    Chemistry Greats: Rosalind Franklin

    In a feature for our student-run magazine Resonance, Joshua Nicks looked at the life of Rosalind Franklin, one of the key scientists behind the discovery of DNA.

    Categorised under: Resonance and Features

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    Diamonds in the Rough

    Often found glistening in tiaras and engagement rings, diamonds are considered a true symbol of wealth and opulence. Their popularity with jewellers is attributed mostly to their natural sparkle and colour (or, to be more precise, the lack of colour (completely colourless diamonds are extremely valuable). However, the smaller stones that don't find their way onto rings and pendants are used in performance cutting tools and high pressure cells.

    Categorised under: Resonance and Features

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    The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2017: Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    Last year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to three scientists who pioneered the work of Cryo-Electron Microscopy (Cryo-EM). Jacques Dubochet from the University of Lausanne, Joachim Frank from Columbia University and Richard Henderson from the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge were awarded the 2017 prize for using the technique for revolutionalising the way we image biomolecular structures in solution.

    Categorised under: Resonance

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    Plastic Money

    The money in our wallets is changing. The past two years have seen the conversion from old-fashioned "paper" banknotes to modern polymer banknotes, with the introduction of the £5 note in September 2016 and the new £10 note in September 2017 – but what makes these notes better and what heightened security measures do they offer?
     

    Categorised under: Resonance

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    Smartphones: Behind the Screen

    The number of smartphone users has increased dramatically in the decade following the release of the first iPhone. But how much do people know about the chemical complexity of the gadget in their pocket, and are there enough resources to keep up with the ever-increasing demand? 

    Categorised under: Resonance

  • Nitrifying Our Earth

    Nitrogen is vital for healthy growth of plants and crops. Artificial fertilisers are added to our crops to supply nitrogen, but could we be driving nitrification of soils too far?

    Categorised under: Resonance

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    Nanobots

    Picture a robot, and the image that might come to mind is one of a metallic machine, often a crude representation of a human, designed to perform simple tasks such as cleaning or cooking. An image less likely to come to mind is that of a nanoparticle-sized machine, moving within your bloodstream. 

    Categorised under: Resonance

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    The Chemistry of Nostalgia

    So many aspects of our seasonal traditions are filled with nostalgia. Out of our five senses, however, it is smell that really transports us back in time. But how is it that smell brings back such strong emotions that none of our other senses can compete with?

    Categorised under: Resonance

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    The 1967 Nobel Prize: Fifty years later

    Fifty years on from George Porter winning the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, our Resonance student news team describe the research he completed here at the University of Sheffield, which earned him the award.

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    Chocolate: Beneath the Wrapper

    At some point during our time studying science, most of us will learn a little about the chemistry of chocolate. As a topic it clearly has a wide appeal and is a good example of the applications of chemistry in everyday life. However one of the aspects of the chemistry of chocolate that I was not so familiar with from my studies is what interesting compounds it contains and what properties and effects they have. Is there a reason why we love it so much?

    Categorised under: Resonance

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    The Hidden Detective: How Chemistry Helps Catch Criminals

    In recent years, the world of forensic science has been cast into the spotlight in several TV shows. These programmes often depict glamorous people shining UV lights in dark rooms and, inevitably, catching the culprit. But how accurate are these depictions and how much chemistry is involved?

    Categorised under: Resonance