CMIAD News

Results 16 to 23 of 23.

  • Rail tracks and Parkinson's disease

    A new research project conducted by CMIAD members, Dr Kurt De Vos and Dr Alex Whitworth looks at the potential benefits of drugs that rescue axonal transport defects in Parkinson’s disease.

    Categorised under: News

  • New lead for potential Parkinson’s treatment

    Key CMIAD researchers, Dr Kurt De Vos and Dr Alex Whitworth  have found vital new evidence on how to target and reverse the effects caused by one of the most common genetic causes of Parkinson’s.

    Categorised under: News

  • PhD student 3rd year symposium winners 2014

    Congratulations to Sarah Palmer (Ayscough and Winder labs) and Katie Baldwin (Whitworth lab) who both won prizes in this year's 3rd year symposium presentations.

    Categorised under: News

  • Viagra could help treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    BMS and CMIAD member, Professor Steve Winder recently spoke to the BBC about the possibility of using viagra to treat muscular dystrophy.

    Categorised under: News

  • MRC award for CMIAD members, Ian Sabroe and David Dockrell

    Award for CMIAD members, Ian Sabroe and David Dockrell from the Medical Research Council to continue exploration of the roles of Pellino-1 in airways infection.

    Categorised under: News

  • CMIAD PI modifes Botox treatment for the relief of pain

    A team of 22 scientists from 11 research institutes led by Professor Bazbek Davletov, created and characterised a new molecule that was able to alleviate hypersensitivity to inflammatory pain.

    Categorised under: News

  • Stem cell “sticky spots” recreated by scientists

    Randomly distributed sticky spots which are integral to the development of stem cells by maximising adhesion and acting as internal scaffolding have been artificially recreated by experts from the University of Sheffield's CMIAD group.

    Categorised under: News

  • Exploring the cause of childhood brain tumour

    BMS and CMIAD member, Dr Andrew Furley, will investigate the cause of the most common form of childhood brain tumour following a £200,000 award from Yorkshire Cancer Research.

    Categorised under: News