Logos of Arts & Humanities Research Council and Connected Communities‘Mapping the Music' - a potential space: music as a catalyst for improved community cohesion

Connected Communities Festival 2016: Community Futures and Utopias

‘Mapping the Music’ is a co-produced participatory arts research project taking place as part of the AHRC’s Connected Communities Festival 2016: Community Futures and Utopias. It will look at the potential that music has to create a space for positive contact between students and schools and act as a catalyst for improved community cohesion. The project will develop a series of workshops on local music practice and heritage in collaboration with the Roma heritage communities within Page Hall and in the Fir Vale area of Sheffield. The project aims to improve the profile of the Roma community, encourage engagement with them, and open up opportunities in music education on a city wide scale.

The Connected Communities Festival 2016: Community Futures and Utopias is supporting high quality participatory arts research and research co-production activities on the theme of community futures and utopias across the UK. These activities aim to build upon, widen and deepen community engagement with the Connected Communities Programme of research and wider AHRC/RCUK-funded research.

The management team who are delivering activities include John Ball and Kate Pahl, with Andrew Davey (Department of Music): lead contact at Fir Vale School, Sheffield. Kate Pahl is the lead applicant. John Ball will be the lead researcher and will initiate and oversee the setting up of a working group and the proposed ‘Music Coproduced’ ensemble.

Transmitting Musical Heritage - Mapping the Music (2015)

The Imagine Project

Connected Communities Festival 2016: Community Futures and Utopias

Contact Details:

If you would like to know more about this project please contact Kate Pahl: k.pahl@sheffield.ac.uk

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