Online EAP Conference Header

Online EAP Conference
The Cultures of EAP: Celebrating and Exploring Diversity
15th and 16th January 2015

EAP Conference Hashtag #eapcultures15This conference took place and allowed EAP teachers all over the world to share their experiences with each other. We would like to thank all the speakers and attendees for their participation in the conference and we hope to run a similar event next year.

Presentation Recordings

If you weren’t able to attend the sessions, you can access the recordings of them below. Please note that you will need to view these on a desktop/laptop pc as they require flash. It’s unlikely you will be able to view them on a mobile/tablet. Also, the first recording (Julie Moore) is in a different format as it didn’t record properly on the day. Luckily though, a colleague, Steve Kirk, has provided a screen recording of the session so you are able to view the whole presentation and we give a big thanks to him for that. We hope you enjoy them.

Thursday 15th January (all times GMT)

Time Presenter Title and Presentation Recording Link Abstract
11:00 - 11:30 Julie Moore (OUP author & lexicographer) Global EAP: what does it mean to you? (link) Click Here
11:45 - 12:15 Elizabeth Anne The two cultures (cubed) (link) Click Here
12:30 - 13:00 Hasan Shikoh Teach English? Get Personal! (link)
Presentation Cancelled
Click Here
13:15 - 13:45 Joanna Malefaki The impact of assessment criteria and learner needs on presentation skills syllabus design (link) Click Here
14:00 - 14:30 Anthony Ash Polishing EAP at Polish Universities (link) Click Here
15:30 - 16:00 Leanne Marie Cameron EAP in the Void: Balancing English and Content Instruction in Rwanda Universities (link) Click Here
16:15 - 16:45 Tony Prince Exploring culture in the support and training of teachers of EAP online (link) Click Here

Friday 16th January (all times GMT)

Time Presenter Title and Presentation Recording Link Abstract
11:00 - 11:30 Edward de Chazal (OUP author) The Globalization of EAP: Changing Cultures? (link) Click Here
11:45 - 12:15 Anne Hodgson Dealing with cultural diversity in class (link) Click Here
12:30 - 13:00 David Brown Entering the metropolitan hub of EAP: the record of an outsider looking in (link) Click Here
13:15 - 13:45 Neslihan Önder Özdemir Medical students’ perceptions on the Teacher’s Role in a non-Anglophone Context (link) Click Here
14:00 - 14:30 Caroline Fletcher Teaching EAP One-to-One (link) Click Here
14:45 - 15:15 Robin Turner EAP as liberal arts: the role of CBI courses in English-medium universities (link) Click Here
15:30 - 16:00 Christopher Smith Methodology in English for Specific Academic Purposes (link) Click Here
16:15 - 16:45 Nadia Idri Questioning Academic English Writing Performance among EFL Masters: The Case of Bejaia University (link) Click Here

Presentation Abstracts

Julie Moore - Global EAP: what does it mean to you?

With increasing numbers of universities across the world switching to English medium instruction, the demand for EAP is set to grow. But what does EAP mean in different contexts? Are we all talking about the same thing?

In this session, I’ll share my own experiences of meeting teachers of English at university level from across the world and discuss the differences I’ve come across in terms of students, teachers and institutions. I’d also like to hear from you about what EAP means in your own context.

We’ll finish off by considering the implications of these differences for the future of EAP resources, teacher training and professional development.

Elizabeth Anne - The two cultures (cubed)

Teaching English (i) to scientists (ii) in France (iii) gives a very different vision of EAP.

After Justifying this affirmation, (with the help of CP Snow, MAK Halliday, Galileo and others) I will give an overview of some the imaginative teaching which results from an extremely restricted syllabus for the second year students at the Université Joseph Fourier in Grenoble, France where some 1200 budding scientists, with English ranging from A2 to C1, all take the same exam the end of the year. 

Hasan Shikoh - Teach English? Get Personal!

Most EAP practitioners would advocate keeping abreast of the latest theories in ELT practice, attending conferences, and exchanging good practice with colleagues. But being a successful teacher involves more. Developing an awareness and appreciation of the cultural backgrounds of students is also key.

In this presentation, I argue that, in addition to developing a sound understanding of English grammar, academic competence is best acquired and retained through individual associations, rather than examples largely arising from the target language or culture. I provide personalised analogies that enhanced skills and language acquisition for my students, irrespective of their learning style or background.

Joanna Malefaki - The impact of assessment criteria and learner needs on presentation skills syllabus design

When designing a syllabus for EAP presentation skills what should be the focus? This presentation will look at presentation skills assessment criteria used by different UK universities; where they meet and how they differ. It will also present the learner needs of a group of Greek post graduate students, who had never had presentation skills input, and their performance based on these criteria. It will then show how the combination of these assessment criteria and the learner needs determined the focus points and the objectives of a presentation skills syllabus.

Anthony Ash - Polishing EAP at Polish Universities

EAP in Poland is a bit of a dichotomy: you either do it through English studies (and even then it is limited) or you don't it at all.

This presentation will make a comparison between the role of EAP in the UK and Poland and it will highlight a number of areas where Poland could widen EAP access.

Nadia Idri - Questioning Academic English Writing Performance among EFL Masters: The Case of Bejaia University

After eight years of supervising master students working on their theses, we observed that EFL students cannot develop their ideas using appropriate academic style. Although they choose topics of interest, they display difficulties in constructing their thoughts appropriately. This paper focuses on the problems Algerian EFL masters face when preparing a thesis for their degree. We shall enumerate the difficulties they face. Our classification is based on: accuracy, academic style, cultural clues and language interference. A number of recommendations such as teaching EAP, tutoring learners will be suggested as part of the curriculum at early stages.

Leanne Marie Cameron - EAP in the Void: Balancing English and Content Instruction in Rwanda Universities

Rwanda's recent language conversion has established English as the language of commerce and education, now the language of instruction in high education. This requires students with an intermediate level to complete all coursework in a second language despite a clear lack of EAP courses to augment their major classes. When presented with teaching a challenging subject, Psycholinguistics, the presenter sought a balance between subject matter, language instruction, and study skills application. She shares the challenges faced by this group of Rwandan university students, and discusses EAP practices that can be applied in a content course while meeting outlined curricular objectives.

Tony Prince - Exploring culture in the support and training of teachers of EAP online

This presentation will look at the work done on the NILE (Norwich Institute for Language Education) online training course in EAP, with teachers from varied educational contexts and cultures.

It looks at the areas explored in relation to culture, discussing the reasons for this focus, reporting on the feedback from teachers.

It will include discussion of a) Critical thinking across cultures b) dealing with feedback and assessment c) Finding and Using information in academic study.

Edward de Chazal - The Globalization of EAP: Changing Cultures?

As EAP is becoming globalized, the major destination countries – including the USA and the UK – are losing market share to emerging education hubs such as certain Asian and Arab countries. Increasing mobility of students is accompanied by similar movements of EAP teachers and academic faculty. This presentation explores these emerging trends with reference to institutions in different countries, and investigates what these changes mean for people, places, and practices.

Anne Hodgson - Dealing with cultural diversity in class

Intercultural diversity appears on the rise in tertiary education. In 2013, every fifth freshman at a German university was a foreigner, an increase of 5.8% over the previous year. Many postgraduate courses have adopted English as the language of instruction. This has great potential for social learning, but also presents new challenges to the soft skills teacher unprepared for diverse learner expectations. We’ll look at some of the critical incidents I faced, and the communicative activities and techniques I subsequently employed. This session is an open invitation to share your experiences and discuss ways of facilitating intercultural groups.

David Brown - Entering the metropolitan hub of EAP: the record of an outsider looking in

This paper will involve the observations and records of a practitioner with experience at an international level of EAP over thirty years entering the British system for a period of 9 years between 2008 and 2014. The discussion of British cultural discourse its theoretical and applied linguistic impulses and EAP interaction will include comparison with and experience of cultures from China, Africa and the Middle East. As a source of empirical evidence it will draw on examples internationally,nationally and focus on the development of accredited summer courses (EAP)and insessional courses(ESAP) at Bangor University( Wales) in the UK between 2011 and 2014 and their changing cultural, academic and professional purpose in a global context.

Neslihan Önder Özdemir - Medical students’ perceptions on the Teacher’s Role in a non-Anglophone Context

As an ESAP practitioner, I have been teaching medical English courses to Turkish medical students for the last five years in a state university in Turkey. At first I thought that my ELT education background could be satisfying for the classes with a course book on medicine. However, the first week of ESAP course five years ago, I realised that after collecting written comments (n=98) from medical students, their expectations of the medical English specialist is not an English instructor but a practitioner who should have (i) education background both on ESP and medicine (ii) intensive medical content knowledge (iii) a good competency of English and (iv) willingness to update herself/himself in medicine. My five-year teaching experience and also longitudinal observation also confirmed the qualifications medical students reported and I have been improving myself accordingly.

Caroline Fletcher - Teaching EAP One-to-One

English Language Tutors working at universities are frequently met with requests from international students for one-to-one lessons. Yet almost all EAP materials and teacher training sessions are designed for group teaching. This presentation highlights key differences between group and individual teaching, and demonstrates how a clear understanding of teacher roles in the one-to-one classroom combined with activities developed for one-to-one lessons can lead to greater progress and satisfaction for both student and teacher.

Robin Turner - EAP as liberal arts: the role of CBI courses in English-medium universities

The teaching of writing at an undergraduate level is influenced by two different academic cultures: the culture of ESP (associated more with British universities) and the culture of composition (associated more with US universities). These tend toward an instrumental approach and a developmental approach respectively. Here I make the case for a content-based approach which combines these two cultures by emphasising specific skills related to real academic discourse (rather than the pseudo-genre of the freshman essay), while at the same time providing content designed to broaden students' academic interests and hone their critical thinking skills.

Christopher Smith - Methodology in English for Specific Academic Purposes

The internationalisation of higher education has led to the growth of ESAP, requiring EAP teachers to deal with the texts and tasks specific to disciplines and departments. This talk will briefly define ESAP before outlining an ESAP methodology based around Swales’ genre analysis, identifying structure and communicative purpose in authentic texts, combined with a critical pedagogy which recognises students as discipline experts and adopts an investigative group methodology to textual analysis. For production, it is important to create an authentic purpose and include both peer and teacher feedback. Practical examples will be provided for all of these stages.