Lucy Morgan

Department of History

Research student

Photo of Lucy Morgan
LRMorgan2@sheffield.ac.uk

Full contact details

Lucy Morgan
Department of History
Profile

Thesis title: Intersections of manhood and paternity in post-Civil War England, 1650-1750

Supervisors:

Period:

1500-1800

Thesis abstract:

In my research I will investigate the social value of paternal roles (particularly marriage and fatherhood) from 1650 to 1750. The political and ideological shift in this period was reflected in a change in the behaviours ascribed to manhood; the ideal man ceased to be defined by his honour and came to be associated with civility and politeness. I seek to understand how this was reflected in contemporary depictions of paternity and paternal roles, and how this affected relationships between men.

I am particularly interested in appropriate standards of behaviour and how individuals judged the behaviour of their peers. My sources are taken from men’s life-writing, including Sheffield’s Wentworth Papers, and other written texts like conduct-books, literature and theatre, depositions, and news reports. I hope to build up a fuller picture of the expected traits and actions associated with paternity and paternal roles, and what the consequences were for men who did not embody those standards.

Qualifications
  • PhD History, University of Sheffield, 2021 - present
  • MA Early Modern History, University of East Anglia, 2018-2019
  • BA (Hons) History, University of East Anglia, 2015-2018
Grants
  • Mark V Williams Scholarship (University of East Anglia, May 2018) £7,550
Professional activities
  • Member of the Northern Early Modern Network
  • Sub-Unit editor of the Midlands Historical Review
Publications and Conferences

Book Reviews

  • “Evelyn Welch, ed., Fashioning the Early Modern: Dress, Textiles, and Innovation in Europe, 1500–1800.” European History Quarterly 50, 4 (2020)
  • “Valerie Schutte and Estelle Paranque, eds, Forgotten Queens in Medieval and Early Modern Europe: Political Agency, Myth-Making, and Patronage.” European History Quarterly 50, 3 (2020)
  • “Silvia Z. Mitchell, Queen, Mother, and Stateswoman: Mariana of Austria and the Government of Spain.” European History Quarterly 50, 1 (2020)
  • “Meredith K. Ray, Daughters of Alchemy: Women and Scientific Culture in Early Modern Italy.” European History Quarterly 49, 3 (2019)

Articles

  • “Cross-Dressing for Self-Empowerment: a Case Study of Margaret Cavendish.” EPOCH 1, 4 (2021)