Photo of Dina GusejnovaDr Dina Gusejnova

B.A., M.A., M.Phil, PhD (Cantab), Marie Curie European doctorate

Lecturer in Modern History

20th century intellectual and cultural history; transnational history; Europe in global contexts; modern German history; Russian and Soviet history; history of citizenship, statelessness and displacement; history of modern punishment and internment; comparative imperial and colonial history; history of emotions; postsocialism

d.gusejnova@sheffield.ac.uk

+44 (0)114 22 22561 | Jessop West 3.03

On Maternity Leave 2018/19

Profile

Biography

I am a Lecturer in Modern History, currently working on the intellectual and cultural history of statelessness and forced displacement in British and transnational contexts. I have previously taught at Queen Mary University of London, UCL, where I was based at the Centre for Transnational History, and at the University of Chicago. Having got my university degrees in Cambridge, (BA in History, MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History, and a PhD), I also spent time as a Marie Curie and DAAD visiting scholar at the Universities of Groningen, Stanford, and UC Berkeley.

My research profile is at the intersection between political, cultural, and intellectual history. My first book, European Elites and Ideas of Empire, 1917-57 (Cambridge UP), is now available open access here.

Professional Roles

International Officer and Erasmus Tutor in the Department.

External Examiner, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences.

Co-convener of Passionate Politics, a three-year long interdisciplinary research project on the History of Emotions based at UCL.

Regular contributor to Russian public science platform www.postnauka.ru (http://postnauka.ru/author/gusejnova).

Memberships

German Studies Association

German History Society

International Society for Cultural History

European Network in Universal and Global History

L’histoire sociale des idées politiques en perspectives (Paris Ouest, Nanterre and Sciences-Po)

Research

Research

My research lies at the intersection between the intellectual, social and cultural history of twentieth-century Germany and Central Europe. I am particularly interested in moments of political transition as well as the social contexts in which ideas and ideologies emerge. My current research deals with the history of civilian internment during the Second World War, with a particular focus on the cultural and intellectual history of knowledge communities which were affected by this experience.

Areas of research supervision

I welcome research students wishing to work on any aspect of intellectual history from the early modern to the modern period, on modern European history (especially the German and Russian empires and Austria-Hungary, as well as their twentieth-century successors), twentieth-century transnational, imperial and global history, and the history of non-governmental organisations. If you seek to integrate interdisciplinary approaches to history in your work, such as concentrating on sources from the visual arts and music in social and political contexts, I would also be happy to advise you.

Research Supervision

Sabine Hanke: 'Staging Local, Acting Global. A History of the German and British Circus (1890-1945)'

Further information on research opportunities within the department.

Publications

Full list of Publications

Books

European Elites and Ideas of Empire, 1917-1957 (Cambridge University Press, 2016)

(Editor): Cosmopolitanism in Conflict: From the Seven Years' War to the Cold War (Palgrave Macmillan, in preparation)

Journal Articles

'Jazz anxiety and the European fear of cultural change: towards a transnational history of a political emotion’', Cultural History (forthcoming, April 2016)

'Keyserling's keywords: the challenges of translating Europe', in Comparativ, Issue on Transfer and Translation (November 2015)

(with Olga Smith) 'Fotografie des letzten sowjetischen Jahrzehnts: Boris Michajlov als Auto-Phänomenologe der Stagnationszeit', Fotogeschichte, 35: 136 (2015)

'Der Prophet als Parfum: Das Spenglersche am europäischen und amerikanischen Modernismus' ['The Prophet as a perfume: Spenglerianism in European and American modernism'], in Zeitschrift für Weltgeschichte [Journal of World History], Issue 2 (2014)

'The Internet as a Potemkin Village of Modern Russian Penal Practice', Laboratorium 5: 3 (December 2013), pp. 56-83.

'Politicheskaia teoria ot pervogo litsa. Ot « kluchevogo perezhivania» k otkryvaniu obshestva' ['Political theory from the first person perspective. From «key experience » to open society'], in Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie [The New Literary Review], special issue on 'Closed Societies', 100 (Moscow, 2009), pp. 55-75.

'Concepts of culture and technology in Germany, 1916 – 1933: Ernst Cassirer and Oswald Spengler', Journal of European Studies, 36 (March 2006), pp. 5-30.

Book Chapters

'Sympathy and synaesthesia: the production of cosmopolitan sentiments in Tolstoy's writings on the Crimean war', in Gavin Williams and Roger Parker (Eds.), The Sounds of the Crimean War (Oxford University Press, in preparation)

'Count Harry Kessler's cultural cosmopolitanism in Switzerland during World War I', in Daniel Laqua and Grace Brockington (Eds.), Imagined Cosmopoleis: Internationalism and Cultural Exchange at the Fin de Siècle (Peter Lang, 2015)

'Die russophile Fronde: Mit Kesslers zur bibliographischen Internationale', in Roland Kamzelak (ed.), Kessler, der Osten und die Literatur (Mentis, 2015)

'Noble Continent? German-speaking nobles as theorists of European identity in the interwar period', in Mark Hewitson and Matthew D’Auria (Eds.), European Crisis. Intellectuals and the European Idea, 1917-1957 (Oxford and New York: Berghahn, 2012, paperback out in 2015)

'Olympian or Pathologist? Cassirer, Gundolf and the Hero Myth', in Cultural Studies and the Symbolic, Paul Bishop and R.H. Stephenson (Eds.) (Glasgow: Northern University Press, 2008)

Reviewer

For Cambridge Anthropology, Laboratorium, English Historical Review, Contemporary European History, South African Journal of Philosophy.

Teaching

Module Leader

The Making of the Twentieth Century, HST117 (convenor, lecturer)

The Making of the Twentieth Century, HST117

This course looks back at key developments in the political, social and cultural history of the twentieth century. Its aim is to broaden students' views of twentieth-century history by highlighting the ways in which barbarism and civilising forces went hand in hand in forging twentieth-century history. Rather than proceeding purely chronologically, this module focuses on a series of key themes that have shaped twentieth-century history, such as, for example, globalisation and fragmentation; revolutions; the political, social and cultural history of war; and democracy and mass politics. Each topic is introduced by a series of four lectures given by a subject specialist. An accompanying seminar programme allows for the in-depth discussion of specific issues and case studies.

History Workshop, HST120 (lecturer)

History Workshop, HST120

In the History Workshop you will learn the craft of the historian by working with closely with one of our academics on a particular area of their research while simultaneously developing the skills you’ll need to make the step up to university-level historical study.

How do professional historians go about their work? What skills do they need? And, how do they develop them? In this module, you’ll consider these questions by engaging with real historical questions.

Tutors will base their seminars on their own specific research interests, making this module a great way of integrating you into the research culture of the department and giving you real insight into what our historians actually do. Each tutor will then use this area of research as a means of exploring how historians identify and analyse relevant primary sources and navigate historiographical debates, while teaching a range of skills such as critical reading, bibliographic techniques and effective written and oral communication.

You will also develop skills at working both independently and as part of a wider team. The History Workshop has its own on-line learning environment, which enables you to work at your own pace on a series of research exercises. One of the main assessments for this module is a group presentation where you’ll work with other students to research a particular topic and present your findings to the rest of the group.

Historians and History, HST202 (lecturer)

Historians and History, HST202

This course looks back at key developments in the political, social and cultural history of the twentieth century. Its aim is to broaden students' views of twentieth-century history by highlighting the ways in which barbarism and civilising forces went hand in hand in forging twentieth-century history. Rather than proceeding purely chronologically, this module focuses on a series of key themes that have shaped twentieth-century history, such as, for example, globalisation and fragmentation; revolutions; the political, social and cultural history of war; and democracy and mass politics. Each topic is introduced by a series of four lectures given by a subject specialist. An accompanying seminar programme allows for the in-depth discussion of specific issues and case studies.

Empires and Revolutions in Continental Europe, 1905-23, HST2509 (convenor, lecturer)

Empires and Revolutions in Continental Europe, 1905-23, HST2509

This module explores the disintegration of Europe's continental empires from the 1900s to the early 1920s. The aim is to proceed from a comparative perspective of national and regional revolutionary processes to an understanding of the transnational and transimperial connections underlying the forms of agency and identity in this period.

Most models of modern revolutions are drawn from narratives associated with the French Revolution of 1789-93 and the Russian Revolution of 1917. However, much of this narrative is centred on nations and states, which gives an incomplete understanding of the implications resulting from the collapse of multi-ethnic empires such as Russia, Austria-Hungary and the Ottoman Empire. Engaging with the complexity of various ideas of 'self-determination' on the ruins of these empires, students in this class will grasp the emergence of new institutional and cultural forms of political identification as a gradual and conflicted process in which state building and national identity were only two among many forms of political aspiration.

In addition to giving more people citizenship of new states, the vanishing empires left an unprecedented number of Europeans bereft of political representation. Looking at key moments of disintegration in terms of agency as well as representation, you will be able to trace the emergence of new forms of political imagination, from national democracies and republics to international socialism and fascism. You will concentrate on social and biographical boundary crossing in a revolutionary epoch, drawing attention to the presence of past ideas of revolutions in a decade of transition. While the examinations will concentrate on the case studies covered in lectures, students will be encouraged to use your independent research time to explore case studies of their own choice within the structure offered by the course.

Fugitive culture: Artists, scholars, and political activists in exile, 1917-1945, HST3148/3149 (convenor)

Fugitive culture: Artists, Scholars, and Political Activists in Exile, 1917-1945, HST3148/3149

In the twentieth century, European culture and politics became more globally connected than ever before. Three series of events dramatically increased the number of artists, writers, composers, scholars, and political activists who travelled both to and from Europe in unprecedented numbers: the First World War, the Revolution in the Russian Empire, and the expansion of Nazi Germany. Focusing on Britain, France, Germany, and the United States, students will look in comparative perspective how different branches of culture and knowledge were shaped by the increased intensity of migration in this period.

Cultural Encounters, HST3302 (lecturer)

Cultural Encounters, HST3302

This module considers cultural encounters in medieval, early modern and modern societies within the overall framework of Europe's expansion into what contemporaries considered new worlds. As such, it is concerned with the mechanics of and reflections upon cultural encounters between disparate subjects including missionaries, soldiers, administrators, settlers, slaves, capitalists, and indigenous peoples. It sets out to engage with the notion of cultural interaction and the view that rather than dominant cultures supplanting the subaltern the literature on cultural encounters reveals a more nuanced process of exchange and mediation with agency and vulnerability on both sides.

Work Placement, HST681 (lecturer)

Work Placement, HST681

This module aims to give you an insight into the day to day workings of a museum, school or research institute, in order to develop history-specific vocational skills and promote reflection on the issues involved in disseminating history outside academia. The module provides a vocational component to the Department of History postgraduate portfolio, and may be of particular interest to those MA students not planning to pursue a PhD after their studies. You will choose a placement from those offered at the start of the academic year and then negotiate a role within that placement relevant to their area of study. Following a placement of approximately 100 hours with an employer an essay will then be completed by you reflecting on the work you undertook. Seminars and tutorials before and after the placement will allow students to compare and contrast their experiences.

Public Engagement

Public Engagement

BBC Radio 4 authored programme 'Tarpaulin- a Biography'

School visits and public talks: Isle of Man, collaboration with the Ramsey Grammar School and the Young Walter Scott Prize

'Democracy in the Age of Economic Crisis', at the Democracy and Dictatorship study day for The Training Partnership.

TedEx talk on the topic of 'Missing citizenship' for the themed event on The Missing Link at Goodenough College in London (15 May).

Previously, I have been an invited speaker at public events linking artistic practice to issues of social activism and historical research, including Tate Modern, London ('Cosmopolitan Moments', panel on 'Future citizenship', 29 March 2014), the National Media Museum (with Dr Olga Smith), and the Musée d´Orsay in Paris (Conference on 'Le Comte Harry Kessler, penser l'Europe à travers les arts', organised by the German Art Historical Forum in Paris and the Université Paris, Musée d´Orsay, April 2008). I have also hosted and been involved in public events at the Sakharov Centre for Human Rights in Moscow (where I convened a workshop on Politics and Emotions on 24 December 2012). As an author of features and reviews, I have contributed to the BBC World Service radio and Deutschlandradio.

During my last research project on wartime histories of cosmopolitan thought, I have organised a large conference on linkages between war and cosmopolitanism at UCL. As part of the programme, I curated a virtual platform on the history of the digital media, as well as a concert at the Warburg Institute in London, with a live themed concert on the Gombrichs' grand piano featuring pianist and composer David Owen Norris, broadcast on WEFT.org on the personal radio show hosted by historian Craig Koslofsky at the University of Illinois.

Administrative Duties

Administrative Duties

International Officer

Erasmus and Study Abroad Tutor in History