Dr Suan Sheridan Breakwell

BA (Hons), MPhil (Oxon), DPhil (Oxon)

Interim Teaching Associate in Modern European History

s.sheridanbreakwell@sheffield.ac.uk

2019 Semester One Office Hours: Monday 13:45-14:45

Profile

Biography

I am teaching the Spanish Civil War Special Subject module at the University of Sheffield after finishing a PhD in History at the University of Oxford. My thesis examined the displacement of children and their education and protection in the Republic's colonias during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939). I am interested in the intersection of the Spanish Civil War, the history of childhood, and the history of emotions.

Publications

Publications

Sheridan Breakwell S. (2017) ‘Knowing how to be a Mother’: Parenting, Emotion and Evacuation Propaganda during the Spanish Civil War, 1936–1939. In: Barron H., Siebrecht C. (eds) Parenting and the State in Britain and Europe, c. 1870-1950. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham.

Sheridan Breakwell S. (2017) ‘Knowing how to be a Mother’: Parenting, Emotion and Evacuation Propaganda during the Spanish Civil War, 1936–1939. In: Barron H., Siebrecht C. (eds) Parenting and the State in Britain and Europe, c. 1870-1950. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham.

Teaching

Teaching

The Spanish Civil War, HST384 (Level 3 Special Subject module)

The Spanish Civil War, HST384

This module introduces students to the advanced study of the Spanish Civil War—a conflict that was not only pivotal in the contemporary history of Spain but that also had a resonance far beyond national boundaries. Volunteers, aid workers, and journalists flocked to Spain from all over the globe, turning the Civil War into the world's first media war as well as an international event. Eye-witness accounts (including photography and film) provide a window into the internal cleavages that ravaged Spain between 1936 and 1939. The module covers the period from the demise of the Second Republic to the beginning of Franco's New State and so considers the experience and memory of the Republican defeat alongside the Francoist victory. Like all civil wars, the Spanish conflict was a struggle between competing visions of the nation: whoever won would determine the future shape of Spanish society. The content of these visions will be examined, as will the competing aims of republicans, regional nationalists, and revolutionaries, on the one hands, and those of conservatives, Catholics, and fascists on the other.