Recognition of Excellence

We are proud to list the University of Sheffield Senate Award Fellows awarded for Excellence in Learning and Teaching (listed alphabetically). The Scheme particularly rewards those who have a demonstrated impact on student learning alongside sharing what they do with colleagues and having a profile in the broader University or educational community. We also acknowledge our National Teaching Fellows and HEA Principal Fellows.

National Teaching Fellows

The National Teaching Fellowship Scheme is extremely competitive and we are pleased to have had seven of our academics, past and current, recognised as National Teaching Fellows. For more information on this Scheme, please go here: www.heacademy.ac.uk/ntfs

Eur Ing Dr Tony Cowling

Eur Ing Tony Cowling

Computer Science

a.j.cowling@sheffield.ac.uk

Areas of teaching expertise: software engineering, and those branches of computing that are related to the development of software. Specific aspects of this include curriculum design, the progressive development of skills through the curriculum, the use of problem-based learning and the role of project work, and particularly the importance of realism in projects.

Professor Claire McGourlay

Professor Claire McGourlay photo

Law

c.mcgourlay@sheffield.ac.uk

Constantly endeavouring to be to be more than an academic who nurtures a passionate interest in the law, Claire strives to develop approaches to teaching across a number of mediums that influence, motivate and inspire students to learn. As well as the traditional lecture and seminar formats she champions distinct and diverse teaching styles and methods to ensure everyone is supported and given the opportunity to excel. These include introducing video activities into the module 'Introduction to Legal Process'; promoting the use of portfolios and e-portfolios through 'FreeLaw' and ‘Miscarriages of Justice' and bringing passion and dedication to growing and further establishing a range of internationally-acclaimed student-led pro bono projects.

Claire was the first person in the Faculty of Social Sciences to be promoted to Professor of Student Education in 2013.

Professor Deborah Murdoch-Eaton

Deborah Murdoch-Eaton Medical Education

d.murdoch-eaton@sheffield.ac.uk

Deborah was awarded her Fellowship in 2004 whilst Professor of Medical Education at the University of Leeds. Now Dean of Medical Education at Sheffield, she is widely recognised as an expert in medical education, who specialises in work on feedback, curricular development and generic skills underpinning learning. Her research interests reflect these areas, as well as extending to the areas of social accountability, global health and international medical education.  

Professor Brendan Stone

Stone

English Literature, Language and Linguistics

b.stone@sheffield.ac.uk

I have experience and interests in the following areas: accessibility and inclusivity; creative use of technologies; interdisciplinarity; collaborative working; employability in core curricula and assessment; social engagement and enterprise in the curriculum.

Dr Duco Van-Oostrum

Dr Duco Van Oostrum

English Literature, Language and Linguistics

d.oostrum@sheffield.ac.uk

Teaching for me is about discovery.  It's inspirational to see students engaged, with initiative, and using their creativity.  Within the constraints of assessment and a structured learning environment, such as the Sheffield University system, I hope that students can take risks and be imaginative.

Professor Brian Whalley

Department of Geography

b.whalley@sheffield.ac.uk

Please visit www.sheffield.ac.uk/geography/staff/w_brian_whalley/profile to find out more.

Dr Christopher Stokes

The School of Clinical Dentistry

c.w.stokes@sheffield.ac.uk

Please visit www.sheffield.ac.uk/dentalschool/about/staff/stokes to find out more.

HEA Principal Fellows

The Higher Education Academic awards Principal Fellowships in recognition of a sustained and effective record of impact at strategic level and a wider commitment to academic practice and strategic leadership in teaching and enhancing the student learning experience at a national or international level.  There are just of 600 Principal Fellows worldwide and we are pleased that we have the following at this University.  For more information on how to apply for Principal Fellowship, please contact Nigel Russell (n.russell@sheffield.ac.uk).  For other categories of HEA Fellowship (AFHEA, FHEA, SFHEA) please visit the learning and teaching recognition scheme at : www.shef.ac.uk/lets/cpd/ltprs. Our pool of Principal Fellows is growing.

Professor Elena Rodriguez-Falcón

Elena Rodriguez Falcon

Mechanical Engineering

e.m.rodriguez-falcon@sheffield.ac.uk

Elena is recognised for her enterprise education practices and her passion for diversity matters and engineering. Elena's current goals include:

  • to enhance and embed an enterprise culture and environment across the University of Sheffield,
  • to continue to make a difference to society through her social enterprise teaching but also as part of the Civic University project,
  • to enable her Faculty of Engineering to become the first choice for women to come to study and to work, whilst raising the profile of engineering.
Professor Tamara Hervey

Tammy Hervey

School of Law

t.hervey@sheffield.ac.uk

Tamara Hervey's PFHEA is in recognition of her international profile in learning and teaching and her long-standing reflective practice that rejects, challenges, or at least questions the oppositional binaries that constrain what we might achieve in HE: student/staff; teacher/learner; research/teaching; research/administration; teaching/administration; knowledge/skills; knowledge/values; doing/thinking; early career/established academic; virtual/real; academy/so-called ‘real world’; work/life. Tamara utterly rejects the distinction often made in HE between research and teaching. She thinks it is one of the most insidious and damaging binaries in the sector, and it holds us back from achieving many things, not least explaining to the rest of the world what the academy stands for and embodies. Her experience is that the two activities are */never/* in a zero sum game relationship. She insists, "I am a learner, the same as her students. They are researchers, as am I. " She seeks to work with students, to answer the questions that interest us, and that interest or should interest the world. Her understanding of what it means to be a professor in a research and learning-led institution such as a university inherently involves the integration of academic practice in these ways.

www.sheffield.ac.uk/law/staff/thervey

Susan Gill

Susan Gill

Learning and Teaching Services

s.j.gill@sheffield.ac.uk

Susan Gill is Head of Learning and Teaching at the University of Sheffield and developing others to enhance learning and teaching is key to her role. She has worked in strategic leadership roles in learning and teaching in Higher Education for over 20 years and is passionate about providing infrastructure and support to deliver an excellent learning experience both for students and her team. Her areas of interest include engaging students in developing their skills and attributes to become inquiry based learners who are able to apply their knowledge to real life wicked problems, assessment practices and using policies and information about programmes to both inform students, and support the development of holistic integrated programmes of study.

www.shef.ac.uk/lets/about/staffprofiles/susangill

Jane Ginniver

Jane Ginniver

Human Resources

j.ginniver@sheffield.ac.uk

Jane Ginniver is the HR Manager with responsibility for the University's leadership and management development, which includes Sheffield Leader and MANAGE. The Principal Fellowship was awarded as a result of the depth and breadth of these areas of work in addition to ongoing work in the area of the university's senior leadership development. Achievements outside the university have included developing partnership working with Carleton University in Canada, active participation in and contribution to an international good practice-sharing community (NCCI) and advocating the development of technical staff through her role as Regional Co-ordinator and Board Member of HEaTED.

Dr Nigel Russell

NVR

Learning and Teaching Services

n.russell@sheffield.ac.uk

See profile at: www.sheffield.ac.uk/lets/cpd/nvrussell

Claire Allam

See profile below.

Dr Abbi Flint

Management School

abbi.flint@sheffield.ac.uk

Dr James Field

The School of Clinical DentistryJames Field

j.c.field@sheffield.ac.uk

James is a Senior Clinical Teacher and a Consultant in Prosthodontics in the School of Clinical Dentistry. Locally he is programme lead for the DClinDent in Prosthodontics.

James' Senior and Principal Fellowships were awarded in recognition of sustained local, national and international impact and leadership in the field of multi-professional dental education. He has a particular interest in professional development, tools that support effective reflection, and student satisfaction. Most recently, James is leading a pan-European review of the undergraduate dental curriculum.

Find out more by visiting James' profile here: www.sheffield.ac.uk/dentalschool/people/field_j#tab00

Dr Sandra Zijlstra-Shaw

The School of Clinical DentistrySandra

s.zijlstra-shaw@sheffield.ac.uk

I am delighted to receive recognition for both my duties as deputy Director of Learning and Teaching in the School of Clinical Dentistry and my education research with its wider impact on the area of assessment of professionalism. I am grateful for the support of the School in allowing me to develop educational activities, which I believe, improve the students’ educational experience. I have been described as “challenging the conventional activities of dental schools and questioning what is core to dental education”. I firmly believe that we should challenge boundaries and encourage my students to do the same, with the twin goals of quality care for patients and quality education for all.
Further profile at
www.sheffield.ac.uk/dentalschool/people/zijlstra_shaw_s#tab03

Senate Fellows (alphabetical)

Our internal scheme for recognising excellence in Learning and Teaching is also very competitive. It opens each February and applications are usually due in April. For more information go here: www.shef.ac.uk/lets/cpd/reward

Dr Asha Akram

Asha AkramPsychology

a.akram@sheffield.ac.uk

I feel very honoured and humbled to receive the Early Career Senate Award for Excellence in Learning and Teaching. My love for teaching and learning is a key driver in developing my practice. I am dedicated to working with students to create a learning environment which nurtures curiosity, collaboration and enthusiasm; I believe these factors are key motivators in the learning process. My goal as a teacher is to inspire students and engage them in their learning journeys, and I feel very privileged to be part of this process.

I have developed and delivered a specialist module at level three, The Psychology of Sleep. The content of this module is partly inspired by the students through engaging them in curriculum design. This opportunity engages students and enables them to take ownership of their learning. I also collaborate with external organisations to demonstrate the broader implications of sleep research in an applied context. It’s extremely rewarding to know that students have thoroughly enjoyed this module, with many feeling inspired to pursue a career in this field.
I believe that there is a lot we can learn from communities who have a shared interest in learning and teaching, which is why I’m very pleased to be hosting the Enhancing Student Learning Through Innovative Scholarship (ESLTIS) Conference in Sheffield (July, 2017). This is a fantastic opportunity to disseminate best practice, explore new ideas, and learn from each other, in order to continue delivering teaching that inspires and actively engages our students.

It’s very encouraging to be part of an Institution which recognises and rewards inspirational teaching. This helps raise the profile of learning and teaching as a scholarly activity and further motivates me to continue developing in my practice.

Mr Gary Albutt

Gary Albutt

School of Nursing and Midwifery

g.albutt@sheffield.ac.uk

Previously as a health care practitioner much of my continuing education had to be balanced with working full time. As an educator I developed an interest in supporting flexible learning for part time students and I have focused much of my work on establishing learning opportunities that meet the specific needs this group and of other underrepresented groups. I have championed a style of education provision and a learning ethos that emphasises flexibility. The provision of flexible modular programmes, short courses and study events has supported greater access to learning in the university for part time students and has encouraged the interest and participation of students from under represented backgrounds in a university education, making a university degree accessible to those who would not normally have access to higher education. I have been fortunate enough to work with many excellent colleagues whose support has allowed me to achieve some measure of success in these areas.

Ms Claire Allam

Claire Allam

Learning and Teaching Services

c.allam@sheffield.ac.uk

I currently work at Institutional project level and with the Faculty of Social Sciences on enhancement areas associated with delivering the L&T Strategy. My background area of expertise is the use of learning technologies and multimedia in teaching, in particular with students using video and other media as a tool for learning. Formerly a producer/director of films, I have a Masters in Education.

Professor Roger Anderson

Dr Roger Anderson

Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

r.anderson@sheffield.ac.uk

As Director of Studies, my aim is to help staff to maintain the Department's reputation for excellent, research-led teaching and support for students. In my own teaching, I try to challenge students to understand genetics as a set of intellectual and experimental tools as well as a body of knowledge.

Sue Armstrong

Mrs Sue Armstrong

Faculty of Engineering

s.armstrong@sheffield.ac.uk

As a chartered Civil Engineer with many years experience in the construction industry, I know the value that employers place on graduates having a broad range of skills on entering the workplace. Through working with the Careers Service and engineering departments on initiatives to improve our students’ employability, I have seen that small interventions can significantly improve the reflective and job application skills of our students. Through the Global Engineering Challenge project, the forthcoming 2nd year faculty project and other planned initiatives I hope to further support graduate employment prospects.

Professor Harm Askes

Askes

Civil and Structural Engineering

h.askes@sheffield.ac.uk

I am Head of the Department of Civil and Structural Engineering which has an excellent reputation for teaching as well as research. For me, good teaching and good research both derive from a natural curiosity to want to understand, combined with a desire (and talent) to explain difficult matter in simple terms. As such, in our Department we see teaching and research as two sides of the same coin. During a recent interview for a Lectureship, one of the candidates said that she wanted her students to become better than herself. We appointed her.

As regards my own teaching, I would be lying if I claimed to be an innovative teacher – I use the overhead projector, three coloured pens and about 4-5 transparencies for an hour of fundamental mechanics. I find it immensely satisfying to guide a group of 150 First Year students through a complicated derivation and then see them experience a collective “gotcha” moment.

Dr Nishat Awan

Nishat AwanPsychology

n.awan@sheffield.ac.uk

My teaching is research-led, dealing with issues of migration and I am committed to promoting difference and diversity in learning. As an architect, much of my teaching happens within a design studio context and I support students in imagining how their design work could have a wider impact beyond the studio. I take my position as a feminist, post-colonial scholar seriously, taking the time to support students from different backgrounds.

Professor Ian Bache

Bache

Politics

i.bache@sheffield.ac.uk


My main areas of teaching are EU and British politics, but most recently I have developed a module on Politics and the Quality of Life.  This is a new area for me and one in which teaching will be important in fine-tuning my research interests.  I have been involved in University initiatives on internationalisation for the past 3-4 years and remained interested in this issue.  In addition, I have been active within the Department of Politics in developing support for part-time tutors (a 'tutors' programme in teaching and learning') and have an ongoing interest in widening participation.

Dr Andrea Bath

Learning & Teaching ServicesAndrea Bath

a.j.bath@sheffield.ac.uk

I have a strong interest in partnership-working with academic and professional services staff, a curiosity about seeing things from another perspective and a proven track record of leadership and delivering high quality and timely outputs.

Through the roles that I have undertaken in the University since 1996 I have developed a wealth of institutional knowledge and have increased my own understanding of learning and teaching issues and developments. In recent years I have been lucky to work with excellent colleagues in the Faculties of Arts & Humanities and Engineering, who have made the job interesting and enjoyable!

I currently work in close partnership with the Arts & Humanities Faculty Director for Learning and Teaching (FDLT) and other key staff from across the Faculty to identify and set L&T priorities, to shape strategy and most importantly to plan and take forward action to enhance learning and teaching.

Some recent projects include:

  • Evidencing teaching in promotions for staff on academic contracts
  • Developing a Fellowships in L&T scheme
  • Piloting on-line student evaluation leading to cross-Faculty adoption of a single approach
  • Initiating the AHEAD(Arts & Humanities Enhancement And Development) in L&T programme
Professor Stephen Beck

Dr Stephen Beck

Mechanical Engineering

s.beck@sheffield.ac.uk

Stephen believes that lectures should entertain, signpost and inform in that order.  As well as giving enthusiastic lectures, he is interested in novel ways of teaching, assessment and providing feedback.  He has published papers on his use of podcasts to aid student induction, and (among other things) how he got students to write Haiku summaries of technical papers.  He particularly enjoys teaching thermodynamics to first year students because he feels that the first and second laws hold the key to understanding the world and he wants everyone else to feel the same way.

Between 2008 and 2014 he was Faculty Director of Learning and Teaching for Engineering, and was thus in charge of Learning, Teaching, Assessment and Quality Assurance and Enhancement for the Faculty.  Arising from this was the idea for the The Diamond.  He realised that there was a large amount of commonality in the laboratories (and indeed in other teaching), and by sharing space and equipment across departments, a far better student experience could be obtained.  After a few pilot projects, the basic philosophy for The Diamond arose, and the Faculty now has one large, laboratory filled with muliples of equipment for each topic, and students from the entire Faculty come to use them.  He now leads a team of 50 Technicians, Academics and Administrators to deliver the practical education for the 5000 Undergraduate and MSc students studying in the Faculty of Engineering.

Ms Claire Beecroft

Claire Beecroft

ScHARR

c.beecroft@sheffield.ac.uk

I’ve been teaching in ScHARR for over 10 years and in that time I’ve seen a dramatic widening in the use of technology in teaching and learning, and its been a huge influence on my career. The MOOCs were a fantastic opportunity to take what I’d learned about technology enhanced learning and apply that to an incredibly diverse group of students from around the world. I see technology, and MOOCs in particular, as an enabler and a means of widening access to higher education.

Used in the right way, technology can improve the experience of teaching for both tutors and learners, and improve, rather than lessen, staff/student interaction and engagement. I hope that in the coming years I’ll be able to help others develop their use of learning technologies and experience all the positive things they have brought to my work so far.

Dr Ilaria Bellantuono

Dr Ilaria Bellantuono

Human Metabolism

i.bellantuono@sheffield.ac.uk

I am module leader for a module on "Critical review of the literature", for the Master in Molecular Medicine. To develop students' ability to appraise critically a piece of science and to write a report in scientific style, this module employs mainly a self-directed learning approach with small group tutorials and a one-to-one feedback session for formative and summative assessment. For this it relies on the contribution of around 60 members of staff among academic and post-doctoral researchers. This module is also used to develop post-doctoral researchers teaching skills. A workshop has been designed in collaboratin with LeTS to "train the trainers". Tthis takes place before the summer, so that post-doctoral researchers can practise what they have learnt by taking part to the module in the autumn.

Kieran Bentley

Kieran BentleyProjects & Development

kjbentley1@sheffield.ac.uk

As a recent graduate, it’s been an absolute pleasure working as part of the Online Learning Team on our online courses, including “Forensic Facial Reconstruction: Finding Mr X”. I’ve been producing animations and graphics for our courses since 2014, and it’s a constant source of inspiration getting to work on courses which engage and inspire both TUOS students and learners around the world.

Open online courses provide a really interesting approach to learning and teaching. BMS were a fantastic department to work collaboratively with, and the course wouldn’t have been nearly as successful without such thorough input from both sides. Not in any other department would you have the feedback “love it - tell him I could contract my orbicularis oris muscle and apply it to his skin!”

Professor Catherine Biggs

Professor Catherine Biggs

Chemical and Biological Engineering

c.biggs@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Professor Tim Birkhead

Professor Tim Birkhead

Animal and Plant Sciences

t.r.birkhead@sheffield.ac.uk

As a professor in Animal & Plant Sciences: I enjoy teaching and enthusing undergraduates.

Mr Chris Black

Chris BlackProjects & Development

c.black@sheffield.ac.uk

As the production assistant in the Online Learning Team, I work across the University’s portfolio of open online courses negotiating access to third-party material that will significantly enhance the depth and impact of online learning content we produce. I also ensure our courses meet accessibility standards to be inclusive for all learners.
Prior to joining the University in 2015, I worked in the film exhibition sector for several years with Film Hub North, part of the British Film Institute’s Film Audience Network, and Sheffield International Documentary Festival. I graduated from Sheffield Hallam University in 2009 with a first-class honours degree in Film, History and Criticism.

Mr Chris Blackmore

Chris Blackmore

ScHARR

c.m.blacmore@sheffield.ac.uk

I am a Research Fellow and University Teacher with a special interest in innovative methods of learning and teaching, and in particular in how to use online pedagogies to enhance student experience, and tutor-student interactions. As well as being Course Director of the online MSc in Psychotherapy Studies, I was involved in the collaborative effort to develop, run and evaluate three MOOCs (‘Massive Open Online Courses’) within ScHARR during 2013. I am now helping to advise the University on its longer term strategies for MOOC development and Distance Learning.

Professor Joby Boxall

Professor Joby Boxall

Civil and Structural Engineering

j.b.boxall@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Dr Stephen Bradbury

Dr Stephen Bradbury

Mechanical Engineering

s.r.bradbury@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Dr Dermot Breslin

Dermot Breslin

Management School

D.Breslin@sheffield.ac.uk

Since joining the Management School in 2008, I have really enjoyed working with our students during their time here at Sheffield. Our students face an increasingly competitive global workplace, where the need to learn to adapt and evolve is critical, and as a lecturer I focus on developing core transferable skills that should benefit them in their future careers. The approach I take is driven and shaped by ongoing research, some of which the students themselves have contributed towards. I also try to bring the world of practice into the classroom, through guest speakers, ‘live’ case studies, and organisation-based projects. By recreating the workplace environment, I hope to prepare our students for the future realities they will face. I have further worked to maximise the international exposure of our students, through international student exchanges, creating links with other universities in Europe and beyond, and offering students the opportunity to undertake projects with organisations from outside the UK. I am continually amazed by, and very proud of the abilities and achievements of all our students, from those who overcome incredible personal difficulties, to those who start their own businesses, and make a direct impact on the local community and economy

Dr Garrett Brown

Garrett Brown photo

Politics

g.w.brown@sheffield.ac.uk

The GLI represents a unique opportunity for students and staff and it has been a truly collaborative effort between the members of the GLI team, the Faculty of Social Sciences, and the students themselves. I am delighted and honoured by this recognition and by the fact that the University can back such innovative programmes.

Professor Guy Brown

Guy Brown

Computer Science

g.j.brown@sheffield.ac.uk

Teaching computer science and software engineering at Sheffield is tremendous fun. I believe that learning and creativity are closely linked, and I strive to find approaches to teaching that allow students to flex their creative muscles. This approach has led me to introduce robotics into our first year curriculum, and to develop a course on professional ethics in which students use creative writing to reflect on their own practice. I particularly enjoy collaborating closely with students on their final-year projects. For me, teaching is very much a two-way street; it benefits my own learning, and I’m often amazed by the clever things that our students can do.

Professor Shelagh Brumfitt

Professor Shelagh Brumfitt

Human Communication Sciences

s.m.brumfitt@sheffield.ac.uk

Shelagh Brumfitt, currently HOD in the Department of Human Communication Sciences, has taught mostly on the prequalification speech and language therapy degrees in the Department along with a  record of PhD supervision and taught postgraduate work.  She has extensive experience in course evaluation and professional accreditation at national and international level.

Dr Lauren Buck

Lauren Buck

Biomedical Science

L.Buck@sheffield.ac.uk

I am passionate about creating a positive and interactive learning environment for my students, which nurtures inquisitiveness, collaboration, creative thinking, and enthusiasm for the subject matter - In my opinion some of the key attributes of an excellent scientist, and an outstanding graduate.

I am keen to experiment with teaching activities to find new ways to improve student engagement with the subject matter, from interactive activity lectures and external workshops to 3D printing.

To this end, I have developed an original project which incorporates enterprise education into the anatomy curriculum (currently core content for more than 200 students). This exciting project involving external parties encourages students to become creative problem-solvers, to apply their academic knowledge to real life situations and to consider how to communicate their science effectively. In the two years that the project has run, the students have created work of an excellent standard in terms of content and originality. I never fail to be impressed by the talent of our student body.

Dr Jennifer Burnham

Burnham

Chemistry

j.burnham@sheffield.ac.uk

I love teaching, seeing students grow from their first nervous exercises in the teaching labs developing into confident, experienced, graduates and chemists. The MEd helped me learn about learning, teaching, and enticing students to perform to their maximum potential. Recent projects have taught me how easy it is to underestimate and limit that potential. My students are amazing. The applications in the Level 3 Skills for Success project showed just how much talent and achievement is concealed by the grubby lab coats and scribbled exam scripts. The meddling I do in the curriculum is driven by my desire to enable my students to be the best that they can be, and to know how great they truly are, so that they can become excellent graduates as well as knowledgeable about chemistry.

Dr Julian Burton

Dr J Burton

Academic Unit of Medical Education

j.l.burton@sheffield.ac.uk

Dr Julian Burton is the Deputy Faculty Director for Learning and Teaching in the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health and was awarded "Personal Tutor of the Year" for the faculty by the students. He holds a Senate Award for Excellence in Learning and Teaching and has a Masters in Education. Dr Burton runs the first two years of the MBChB programme and has interests in curriculum design and development, the delivery of feedback and the countering of plagiarism.

Ms Carolyn Butterworth

Carolyn Butterworth photo

School of Architecture

c.butterworth@sheffield.ac.uk

I have been teaching at Sheffield School of Architecture since 2001 and I am very lucky to work with such talented students in such a creative department.

I believe that for inclusive, vibrant and sustainable cities and towns to thrive everyone needs to be part of their development. Architects can play a crucial role in this, both through their design skills and through their skills as agents of change. My role as a teacher is to help my students understand the value of these skills and, through creative projects with local people, learn that collaboration can be a powerful tool to face the challenges ahead.

Miss Harriet Cameron

Miss Harriet Cameron

English Language Teaching Centre

h.cameron@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Dr Paul James Cardwell

Dr Paul Cardwell

Law

p.cardwell@sheffield.ac.uk

I am currently Deputy Head of the School of Law and Director of the Sheffield Centre for International and European Law. My area of expertise is internationalisation, and I have been particularly active in making the School of Law a national leader in sending our students to study abroad for a year in Europe (under the Erasmus programme) or further afield. I have also worked on improving the teaching and learning experience of students in large departments such as the School of Law.

Mr Leo Care

Leo Care

Architecture

l.care@sheffield.ac.uk

I have had the pleasure of teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate levels in The School of Architecture. At every stage of study I have aimed to give students the opportunity to engage with people outside academia. I have learned that students always rise to the challenge of communicating with others and sharing their ideas; becoming great ambassadors for architecture and the university. The experience of working outside the university contextualises learning and enables students to understand the value of their knowledge to a wide range of people. It is incredibly rewarding to see how these learning experiences impact so positively on students and our external partners.

Mr Bill Carmichael-Davis

Mr Bill Carmichael-Davis

Journalism

william.carmichael@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Dr Matt Carré

Dr Matt Carre

Mechanical Engineering

m.j.carre@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Dr Chris Carroll

Chris Carroll

ScHARR

c.carroll@sheffield.ac.uk

I have been involved in postgraduate online learning, first as a tutor and, more recently, as a course director for almost 10 years. My particular interest is in the delivery of online learning to students who work, and therefore who study part-time. The aim is always to use variety when communicating ideas and knowledge, to make learning interactive and flexible, and to make the format and materials visually as well as intellectually appealing. I have been greatly guided in this by colleagues, students and my own research. Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is a broad discipline, developed to support healthcare decision-making, and involving many skills. Supporting HTA capacity-building worldwide, especially in Low and Middle Income Countries, is a principle that informs both my teaching and course direction, and MOOCs offered the perfect means of delivering free, structured, flexible learning to a large international cohort of interested students.

Dr Christina Cerulli

r Cristina Cerulli

Architecture

c.cerulli@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Dr Lili Chen

Dr Lili Chen

East Asian Studies

lili.chen@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Dr Eugenia Cheng

Dr Eugenia Cheng

Mathematics and Statistics

e.cheng@sheffield.ac.uk

I'm a senior lecturer of pure mathematics with this earth-shattering idea that maths lectures should be interesting. Simon Willerton and I started a YouTube channel for short video lectures on graduate level mathematics, and we've now had more than 200,000 hits. We then started using YouTube videos to give extra help on undergraduate courses, and I now also make videos aimed at A-level students for outreach and to help them bridge the vast gap between school and University.

Dr Tom Clark

Tom ClarkSociological Studies

t.clark@sheffield.ac.uk

As a Lecturer in Research Methods, I’m committed to helping our students develop the skills that will enable them to learn about their social worlds in a critically informed way. My approach to learning and teaching continues to emphasise inquiry-based learning, student engagement, and ‘connected curricula’. Whether it be designing interdisciplinary programmes, delivering research-led modules, implementing innovative support structures, or researching the student experience, I enjoy working with students to build the educational spaces that will enable them to thrive whilst studying at Sheffield. Indeed, I am passionate about making sure that our students have the necessary opportunities to shape their participation with TUoS in ways that resonate with their own interests and needs. To date, this has included: HEA funded work on teaching research methods, the Applied Social Science programme in the Sheffield Methods Institute, and a number of projects with the Widening Participation Research and Evaluation Unit. As an ‘Inside Knowledge Scholar’, I am currently working with the student engagement team on a student partnership project designed to embed digital literacy in Sociological Studies programmes.

Dr Sam Clarke

Dr Sam Clarke

Civil and Structural Engineering

sam.clarke@sheffield.ac.uk

Sam’s innovative use of new technologies in his teaching has helped him transform the learning experience in his Yr 1 courses. Sam is particularly interested in developing new, and adapting existing assessment and feedback tools for use in an engineering environment.

Dr Richard Cooper

Dr Richard Cooper

ScHARR

richard.cooper@sheffield.ac.uk

I am a lecturer in Public Health and am the course director for the Master of Public Health degree in the School of Health and Related Research. I teach on a variety of modules on subjects including research methods, needs assessment and ethics. The MPH has always recruited significantly internationally and I have become increasingly interested in how we can best support our international students, including before and after their time of study in Sheffield.

Dr Andrew Cox

Dr Andrew Cox

iSchool

a.m.cox@sheffield.ac.uk

Andrew is a lecturer in information management. His teaching encompasses social media, social informatics and research data management.  In terms of teaching methods his areas of interest are in inquiry based learning, internationalisation and new assessment methods.

Dr James Cranch

James Cranch

Mathematics and Statistics

J.D.Cranch@sheffield.ac.uk

I'm the newest teaching fellow in SoMaS, but have managed to get in on a good range of the fun in that time. Besides (of course) our service teaching for first year engineers, I've been teaching first-year mathematicians, fourth-year mathematicians, engineering foundation students, and school students from Year 10 upwards.

Besides all that, a long-standing hobby of mine is in designing and running maths competitions for schools students: I find this a constant source of new ideas.

Miss Layla Croll

Layla CrollProjects & Development

l.croll@sheffield.ac.uk

I have been developing and producing content in the online learning team since 2013. My work entails collaborating with University of Sheffield academics to design and deliver online courses with a focus on creating engaging learning experiences accessible by anyone with an internet connection. The courses attract hundreds of thousands of learners from all over the world as well as contributing to on-campus learning at Sheffield.

My focus is on translating academic subjects into personable, accessible and engaging courses that can stand alone, online without face-to-face interaction. The courses are openly available and therefore represent and showcase our amazing teaching and research excellence to the world, so my background in broadcast TV and Film helps to ensure the videos are of the highest possible quality.
Previously, I worked in the TV and film industry, producing a wide range of popular fiction from children’s TV to late-night drama and comedy.

I managed the Sheffield International Documentary Festival for four years, developing the conference programme, managing creative workshops and producing interactive social-commentary documentaries using rare archive footage.
I am a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, an assessor for HEA fellowship applications through the LTPRS scheme and am a member of The Digital Engagement Group and The Online Learning Operational Group.
I participate as a member of many working groups to help shape strategic developments and policy for the University, such as Information and Digital Literacy and Creative Commons.

Dr Lee Crookes

Lee Crookes

Urban Studies and Planning

L.Crookes@sheffield.ac.uk

As an academic working in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning, I’m constantly reminding our students of the fact that planning is a profession that helps to bring people – professionals and the public - together to creatively think about making better places. Students best understand this when they’re given the opportunity to work with others in a real-world setting and the Westfield Action Research Project is continuing to provide a tremendous range of opportunities for collaborative work involving local residents and students. In line with the civic ethos on which the University was founded, we are very much trying to ensure that “the University will be for the people”.

The process of bringing people together to think about the future of places is one of the most challenging yet interesting things that colleagues, students, Westfield residents and myself have been involved in. The result of our joint efforts has been the co-production of an initial three-year plan for Westfield that will set the basis for a longer term plan of improvement over the next ten years and beyond.

Dr Julia Davies

Julia Davies photo

School of Education

j.a.davies@sheffield.ac.uk

Having previously been Head of English in a secondary school, I came in 19994, to The University of Sheffield i as a teacher trainer, believing I needed to develop a ‘more serious’ ad ‘grown up’ style of teaching. I quickly realised that taking away fun and playfulness would be tantamount to removing engagement, curiosity and creativity. Moreover I discovered that whatever age we are, we all want excitement and challenge in our learning; we want involvement and to experience success. These are principles I try to make possible through my teaching.

I like the idea of learners being empowered to explore ideas according to their interests; this is why I have been enticed by the potential of new technologies in learning and teaching. I have seen how digital tools can introduce excitement in classes, often facilitating ‘polished performances of old practices’, but more significantly to develop new possibilities for learning and teaching; to open out the boundaries of our classroom walls and to trouble the traditional relationships between learners and teachers.

Dr Beatrice De Carli

School of Architecture

b.a.decarli@sheffield.ac.uk

Miss Hannah Dickinson

Hannah Dickinson photo

Faculty of Social Sciences

hannah.dickinson@sheffield.ac.uk

As a very recent graduate it has been an honour to play an instrumental role in the continued success of the Global Leadership Initiative, and most importantly, to find myself working with inspirational academics across the Faculty of Social Sciences.

It has been a pleasure working as the Administrator behind the Global Leadership Initiative, particularly as through my student-facing role I get to witness first-hand the personal growth and professional development which the scheme affords these students.

I am proud to work for a University which demonstrates such profound commitment to providing exceptional international learning and teaching opportunities for its students.

I am hoping to pursue a PhD in the next couple of years, and ultimately move into an academic career. My involvement with the Global Leadership Initiative team has taught me so much invaluable lessons about inspiring students to strive for greatness, and I only hope that in the future I am able to instil this aspiration in the students I may work with.

Professor Hugo Dobson

Hugo Dobson photo

School of East Asian Studies

h.dobson@sheffield.ac.uk

I returned to the University of Sheffield in 2001 and since then have tried to teach in the way I would like to be taught. It was my A-level History teacher, Mr Kilkenny, who inspired me so I try to emulate his enthusiasm and encourage my students at Sheffield to question everything, look at issues from a different angle and be passionate about a subject. Luckily our students come to Sheffield having chosen a challenging subject to study so the passion is already there.

I attended my first G8 summit alone in 2008 as part of my on-going research into global summitry. I never imagined that I would be able to attend these summits working with a team of student analysts producing policy briefs and publishing them in a recognised journal, Global Policy. This is all thanks to the Global Leadership Initiative, which would never have come about without the input of a number of colleagues across the Faculty of Social Sciences. So, collaboration is at the heart of this initiative, whether it is across the Faculty or with students.

Dr Caroline Dodds Pennock

C Pennock

History

c.pennock@sheffield.ac.uk

Teaching is central to my work as a historian and researcher. I am committed to student-led learning and I love experimenting with different approaches, helping students to find their own ways of grappling with the complexities of the past, and to meet the challenges of the present. In particular, I am interested in the innovative use of digital technologies (such as blogging, social media and online games) to encourage communities of learning and to inspire students to approach their work independently in ways which are creative, engaged, critical and enjoyable.

Dr Sam Dolan

Sam Dolan

Mathematics and Statistics

S.Dolan@sheffield.ac.uk

Dr Sam Dolan

http://maths.dept.shef.ac.uk/maths/staff_info_518.html

School of Maths and Statistics, Faculty of Science I am a Lecturer in Applied Mathematics. At present, I am teaching courses in Relativity; Scientific Computing; and Engineering Mathematics. I particularly enjoy small-group teaching and problem-solving classes. Recently, I have been exploring innovative ways to use technology to enhance learning and the student experience. I was pleased to be involved with Sheffield's new approach to teaching engineering mathematics, using video lectures, online tests, and twice the number of lecturer-led problem-solving classes.

Mrs Gillian Donohoe

Donohoe

Psychology

g.donohoe@sheffield.ac.uk

Working as an experienced clinician within the local health care trust supports the integration of academic and practice based learning essential for the students' learning and future professional role. As an active member of the professional body responsible for on-going professional development and future regulation of Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapists (BABCP), I have a continuing role in trainees’ development post graduation.

Dr Katie Edwards

Katie Edwards

Biblical Studies

katie.edwards@sheffield.ac.uk

I love teaching, but I love even more enabling my students to critically engage with the discipline. As such mine is a model of research-led learning in which students explore how research in the arts and humanities can enrich our engagement with the wider community. A vital element of my practice is to support and encourage our students to take advantage of social and cultural opportunities to have positive influence to the community and their future careers. As a result, students see publicly engaged academics in action and have the opportunity of a unique apprenticeship in this role.

Dr George Eleftherakis

Goerge Eleftherakis

Computer Science, International Faculty

eleftherkis@city.academic.gr

Learning and teaching is my passion. I enjoy every moment I spend with my students. Following a holistic approach towards teaching I support students learning experience inside and outside the classroom. Therefore apart from my active involvement in the development of the curriculum in both undergraduate and postgraduate studies, I strongly commit to support students learning experience through extra curriculum activities.

Working closely with my students, motivated me to establish one of the first ACM and ACM-W student chapters in Europe. Lately my election to chair ACM's Council of European Chapter Leaders enables my efforts to have a significant large scale impact. Finally I founded the Student Spring Symposium in 2002 and established it throughout the years as an annual event, attracting students from all departments of the faculty, advancing the event to a student feast of the university with an excellent multidisciplinary, multicultural, international flavour.

Dr Angela Fairclough

Dr Angela Fairclough

Clinical Dentistry

a.fairclough@sheffield.ac.uk

I teach restorative dentistry to students of all undergraduate years of the course. Stimulating students' enthusiasm for clinical engagement, for enquiry and patient-centred care is my focus in teaching. As Director of Student Affairs my role is one of support, assistance and guidance; helping students during difficult times ensuring that my future colleagues gain the most from their undergraduate experience, whatever the circumstances. My work with progress, appeals and fitness to practice follows on, when outcomes have not matched expectations, however support and guidance are still central to students’ needs and my role also.

Mr Paul Fennell

Mr Paul Fennell

Careers Service

p.fennell@sheffield.ac.uk

Through working with the Careers Service and engineering departments on initiatives to improve our students’ my main interest is in encouraging students to make the most of all the learning opportunities available throughout their university experience. Ensuring they are able to articulate the skills they have developed as part of the transition process beyond higher education.

Professor Matt Flinders

Flinders

Politics

m.flinders@sheffield.ac.uk

As a Professor of Parliamentary Government and Governance I do not view teaching and research as in anyway separate but as two sides of the same coin. My central ambition is therefore to bring the study of politics to life by bridging ‘politics as theory’ and ‘politics as practice’ through the development of innovative methods of teaching that really challenge students in a stimulating but supportive way. I’m also keen to ensure that my students are equipped in terms of professional skills and experience to succeed in the future, whether in relation to further study or the workplace. My collaboration with the Houses of Parliament has allowed me to bring all of these elements together and is now being replicated around the world.

Dr David Forrest

David Forrest

School of English

d.forrest@sheffield.ac.uk

My teaching is driven by a belief that learning should begin with students’ passions, and that life experience offers a fertile starting point for academic education. I am interested in creating mutually beneficial research communities where students, staff and external partners share knowledge and where traditional hierarchies can be challenged. To this end, I am deeply passionate about widening participation and I believe strongly that diversity is a powerful learning resource.

Where possible, I want students to have the opportunity to develop their own research interests and specialisms: I am convinced that students learn most when they are given the confidence to take ownership of ideas.

Dr Joshua Forstenzer

Joshua Forstenzer photo

Philosophy

j.i.forstenzer@sheffield.ac.uk

Learning purely for its own sake never truly appealed to me. Instead I have long believed in learning for the sake of sharing the knowledge acquired, for the sake of enrichening the inner worlds of those who seek to learn, for the sake of unlocking layers of understanding – and in so doing, opening up intellectual horizons and furnishing conceptual tools to better apprehend our world. This is inevitably a two-way process: through dialogic argumentation, students teach me as much as I teach them. But, above all, I have found that my students learn best when they are explicitly asked to learn for the sake of educating others – whether that be their peers or others beyond the classroom. I witnessed this when I trained student volunteers to go out and teach philosophy in local schools as part of Philosophy in the City. I also experienced this when teaching an inquiry based module which called on students to not only comprehend often dense arguments in political philosophy, but to also apply such arguments to develop readily-usable policy briefs. Ultimately, demonstrating to students the relevance of the knowledge they acquire to their lives as well as to the world around them has been and continues to be the greatest lesson I have learned from the great American philosopher and educator, John Dewey

Laura Giles

Laura GilesProjects & Development

l.giles@sheffield.ac.uk

As an Educational Developer for the Online Learning Team, I have been fortunate to work with colleagues from across the University who are at the forefront of innovation in learning and teaching. Before joining the University in 2014, I worked as an Instructional Designer in the eLearning industry. I was responsible for delivering learning strategy and content for a wide range of clients including government departments, public bodies and global FTSE 100 companies. Today, I draw on this experience to help academics here at Sheffield translate their ideas and knowledge into innovative online learning content.

Dr Thomas Goodfellow

Dr Tom Goodfellow

Urban Studies and Planning

t.goodfellow@sheffield.ac.uk

We have an increasingly diverse student body in USP, both in terms of nationality and disciplinary background. I love teaching this context and aim to make the most of opportunities for people from very different backgrounds to share their knowledge and perspectives. I think it is critically important to engage head-on with the contradictions and conflicts generated by different experiences and views of the world, and in my teaching aim to provide a forum for exploring and working through these differences. I enjoy finding innovative ways to stimulate active learning and to apply academic debates to concrete development and urban policy problems.

Dr Helen Griffiths

Dr Helen Griffiths

Academic Unit of Ophthalmology

h.griffiths@sheffield.ac.uk

Helen Griffiths is a lecturer in Orthoptics, teaching on the B Med Sci (Orthoptics) and M Med Sci (Vision and Strabismus) programmes. Helen has developed methods for assessment of clinical skills and is particularly interested in improving feedback to students and developing strategies to engage students in this process.

Dr Kay Guccione

Kay GuccioneResearch & Innovation Services

k.guccione@sheffield.ac.uk

My teaching work is centred around linking people together so they can talk about the things that matter to them. To make this happen, I design mentoring and coaching programmes that provoke learning conversations, partnering research staff and students across the university with mentors who can support them to achieve.

I specialise in teaching professional practices in coaching and mentoring. I teach and supervise researchers and academic staff, and help them get to grips with coaching tools and practices to support their colleagues, students and teams.
Having oversight of mentoring programmes places me in a very privileged position, and brings a lot of insight into the student experience and the early career academic experience. Utilising this evidence-base, I design workshops for doctoral supervisors and research leaders that help them respond to the challenges of leading others and building trusting relationships.

In addition to this research-led teaching, I also engage in teaching-led research, leading projects that take a deeper dive into the doctoral and post-doctoral experience, the relationships that support learning, and how we can help our academic staff to promote a culture of development within research careers and contexts.

Dr Francois Guesdon

Dr Francois Guesdon

Infection and Immunity

f.a.guesdon@sheffield.ac.uk

I have been particularly active in developing student support and personal development in the MSc of Molecular Medicine, where the specific challenge is to obtain student participation in spite of intense demands made to them by the fast-paced assessed curriculum. I am also interested in by the challenges posed by the varying cultural expectations of overseas students regarding learning and assessment.

Dr Nick Gurski

Nick Gurski

Mathematics and Statistics

Nick.Gurski@sheffield.ac.uk

Research mathematics is about coming up with interesting questions, looking at those questions from new angles and then hopefully understanding how things work a little more clearly. The principles that drive my research are the same ones that I use to motivate my teaching. I want students to find their own questions and their own answers, and to gain the same satisfaction from new knowledge that I do. This is why I focus all my teaching on making students active participants in the learning process: sure I like to explain my thinking behind the concepts, but even more important is that they can do the same.

Dr Daniel Hammett

Dr Daniel Hammett

Geography

d.hammett@sheffield.ac.uk

Dan's teaching interests cover a range of undergraduate and postgraduate courses which allow him to ensure that his lectures and seminars are informed by the latest research in his areas of interest. In particular, his teaching explores questions of uneven development, geopolitics and power relations. Through the use of various devices, including board games, music, videos and the media, he engages students in exploring the ways in which our understandings of the world around us are continually reshaped. Throughout these courses he utilises ongoing research interests in sub-Saharan Africa to demonstrate and unpack the theoretical and empirical material presented to make geographic debates interesting and accessible.

Professor Gillian Hardy

Hardy

Psychology

g.hardy@sheffield.ac.uk

As Director of the Clinical Psychology Unit I was responsible for winning the tender for the University to provide post-graduate training for the new NHS Improving Access to Psychological Therapies services, having the programmes approved by the University and appointing and supporting staff to run the programmes.

Dr Giles Harrington

Giles Harrington photo

School of Languages and Culture

g.e.harrington@sheffield.ac.uk

I gained much more from my first degree in Modern Languages than I had expected: it was a truly transformative experience that gave me new perspectives on life and a richer, critical understanding of the challenges that we face today. When devising modules or facilitating seminars, I try to think about how those contact hours and weeks of study function as part of a broader transformative process for learners during their 3 or 4 years at Sheffield.

When I was a student I came to understand more about how I learn and what motivates me. As a teacher I have gained a better understanding of the different ways in which people learn, our different motivations and that offering options can help to support a broader range of learning styles. I therefore try to give students a strong say in their own learning. This co-determination of study involves students selecting assessment types, choosing from different kinds of in-class activities, or proposing the topics that we cover.

When I started teaching I found it to be very challenging and that it required a lot of hard work and energy. I still find that teaching challenges me constantly, but it’s an exhilirating and hugely rewarding responsibility that I enjoy enormously. I’ve been very fortunate to learn from and work with some truly gifted teachers who inspired me and really made me think. Even if I don’t have all their natural talent and ability, I have their example and I try to draw on this to offer students the best learning experience possible

Professor Karen Harvey

Dr Karen Harvey

History

k.harvey@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Dr Thomas Hastings

Dr Tom Hastings

Management School

t.hastings@sheffield.ac.uk

Since joining the Management School in 2014 I have undertaken numerous trips abroad for both fieldwork and research dissemination purposes. The experience of taking students on the GLOSS/GLI initiative to the International Labour Organisation (ILO) in Geneva has been among the most rewarding of these trips.

For the last two years myself and Jason Heyes have facilitated student fieldtrips to the ILO’s Annual Governing Body Sessions: a significant international platform for government officials, labour unions and employer associations to discuss pertinent governance and labour policy issues. Building on their wealth of classroom and desk-based learning, the initiative thus furnishes students with a rare chance to witness ‘real world’ policy making in practice. In addition to this field-based approach to learning, I am a firm believer in research-led teaching, and try where possible to integrate my own practical experience ‘from the field’ into lectures and tutorials. I recently gained experience of delivering training to labour inspectors abroad (in Ireland and South Africa) and I have also shadowed audit-based labour inspections in South Africa.

These experiences have provided me with considerable insights into a range of subject areas of relevance to my students, allowing me to exemplify cases of good ethical practice (e.g. in terms of worker management in different industries) and to offer empirical observations which relate to a range of concepts pertinent to Human Resource Management and Organisational Behaviour course material.

Mr Thanos Hatziapostolou

Hatziapostolou

Computer Science

a.hatziapostolou@city.academic.gr

My main aim in teaching is to engage students’ hearts and minds. Whether through innovative educational technologies or classroom teaching engagement techniques, I try to create an active, student-centred learning environment where learning happens out of interest, curiosity and enjoyment. Following a holistic approach to education whether in or out of the classroom, I place a strong emphasis on the development of the whole person in order to prepare students as much as possible for a very challenging world.

Ms Tracey Hawley-Kirkby

T Hawley-Kirkby

Urban Studies and Planning

hawleytracey@yahoo.co.uk

It has been a pleasure to work with Sheffield University Urban Studies and Planning over the last two years. The Westfield Action Research Project has been a tremendous asset to all of us at Westfield Big Local.

Dr Andrew Heath

Heath

History

a.d.heath@sheffield.ac.uk

I have taught U.S. history at Sheffield since 2008. In that time, I’ve had the opportunity to work on the development of core modules at Level 1 and 3, while also helping to create the American History Research Wiki, which helps students find, evaluate, and use digital sources. With another Senate Fellow, Dr. Charles West, I’ve put together the Witness oral history project – an extracurricular program for History students with an interest in Sheffield’s past.

Dr Tim Herrick

Dr Tim Herrick

Institute for Lifelong Learning

t.herrick@sheffield.ac.uk

Tim works with mature students, generally studying part-time, and often from non-traditional backgrounds. He has particular interest in widening participation, academic student support, and increasing flexibility in modes of study.

Professor Tamara Hervey

Hervey

Law

t.hervey@sheffield.ac.uk

My expertise is in the field of European Union Law. I genuinely believe that research and teaching go together in synergistic relationships, and I involve my students in my learning, and myself in their learning. CILASS inspired me to take my research-led teaching much further into inquiry-based learning, particularly on large compulsory modules. I do lots of collaborative work, and I like to publish with students, and to develop learning and teaching experiences that emphasise the commonality of enterprise between students and profs.

Professor Jason Heyes

Professor Jason Heyes

Management School

j.heyes@sheffield.ac.uk

I have greatly enjoyed being involved in the Global Learning Opportunities in the Social Sciences (GLOSS) programme for the past two years. My field of teaching and research is Employment Relations. In my teaching I encourage students to think about the impact of government policies on workers and employers. I also encourage them to connect developments in employment relations to developments in the global economy. The GLOSS initiative has provided students with an excellent opportunity to understand the importance of making these connections.

As part of the GLOSS initiative I have organised visits to the International Labour Organisation (ILO) and arranged for students to attend meetings of the ILO’s Governing Body. Every student who has participated in these visits has developed a keen appreciation of the consequences of policy interventions and the practical challenges associated with international policy making in relation to employment rights, labour market regulation and governance. I have been extremely impressed with the way in which our students have conducted themselves during these visits. I have been particularly impressed with the knowledge and sophisticated understanding that they have demonstrated when discussing complex topic with ILO officials

Dr Julia Hillner

Dr Julia Hillner

History

j.hillner@sheffield.ac.uk

Julia teaches late Roman history with a focus on the two mega-cities of the period, Rome and Constantinople. She is particularly interested in introducing students to the social and cultural transformations of urban space in this period using the medium of digital mapping. At the same time, she encourages students to critically assess digital technology as an analytical tool which was unknown to the late Romans themselves: such discrepancies between modern scientific approaches and historical ways to represent reality are a recurrent and endlessly fascinating theme in her teaching.

Dr Jane Hodson

Jane Hodson

School of English

j.hodson@sheffield.ac.uk

From the outset my role has been about finding productive ways for different groups to work together, learning from one another and developing new knowledge through shared activity. On arriving at Sheffield in 1998, one of my first challenges was to set up the Single Honours Degree in English Language and Literature within the newly formed School of English, with my colleague Dr Richard Steadman-Jones. This degree enables students to explore the interconnections between literature and linguistics, and has given me the opportunity to collaborate with a wide range of talented colleagues and students.

More recently, I have taken on the role of Director for External Engagement in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. I am passionate about involving students at all levels in external engagement and impact projects. For example, on my level 3 module ‘Dialect in Film and Literature’ undergraduates present their findings to the Yorkshire Dialect Society; at MA level I have led on the development of work placement modules with a strong research element; at PhD level three of my students are working collaboratively with Chatsworth to explore their servants records and present their findings through blogs, storytelling and exhibitions. Such projects offer valuable real-world experience to students, enabling them to develop new skills and perspectives. At the same time, our external partners value the creativity, intelligence and enthusiasm that our students bring to their activities.

Professor Alma Hodzic

Hodzic

Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre

a.hodzic@sheffield.ac.uk

Teaching through research is an important aspect in Higher Education. Educating undergraduate and MSc students using the current and cutting edge research results increases their appetite for learning, and also their employability. The industry and academia work together at The University of Sheffield, in particular at the unrivalled Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre, and informing the students of the current developments makes an immediate impact on our future industrial developments, as many of them become a part of our R&D ecosystem.

Professor Matthew Holley

Holley

Biomedical Science

m.c.holley@sheffield.ac.uk

Teaching and research are equally important to a vibrant university. They feed from each other. My main interest as HoD for Biomedical Science has been to ensure that all staff are openly valued for their contributions to teaching and research and that we know exactly what we mean by 'research-led teaching'.

Mr Dave Holloway

David HollowayProjects & Development

d.holloway@sheffield.ac.uk

As a production manager for the Online Learning Team I am responsible for overseeing a number of the courses which the team produces; including collaborating with academics and creating high-end bespoke learning materials for consumption by TUOS students and learners all over the world.

Previously I worked as an independent filmmaker for over 15 years, creating content for the music and film industries. As such, I am very much enjoying transferring the skills I developed in those creative industries to my role at the University and finding new ways to make high quality resources and delivering them to learners.

Mr David Holmes

Mr David Holmes

Journalism

david.holmes@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Dr Rachel Horn

Dr Rachel Horn

Civil and Structural Engineering

r.horn@sheffield.ac.uk

I am interested in encouraging students to develop a professional approach to their studies, taking responsibility for their learning and becoming aware of employability/professional skills and attributes they have developed. Methods I have used include integrated group projects, interaction with industry professionals and reflective self and peer assessment and discussions. This year I will be "experimenting", with peer and self assessment and feedback.

Dr Robert Howell

Robert HowellMechanical Engineering

r.howell@sheffield.ac.uk

First and foremost, teaching should inspire. I aim to deliver the best possible educational experience for my students – routed in industrial application and practise through use of core engineering science and through clearly communicated inspirational teaching.
I make students work for their understanding – nothing is handed to students on a plate. Questions to me are, where appropriate, answered with a few steps towards an answer but with more questions to the students. Students appreciate this (mostly) and learn more as a result. My exams attempt to move away from receipt learning and assess a deeper understanding of student learning which is again appreciated by students.

Dr David Hyatt

Dr David Hyatt

Education

d.hyatt@sheffield.ac.uk

I won my Senate Award for my contribution on PG teaching in the School over the last 15 years. Most notably I have directed our Singapore programme and the award partly related to innovations on the blended pedagogic approach introduced there. My pedagogic research interests largely focus around academic literacy and the feedback for the postgraduate student. I am interested in researching the doctoral supervisory experience. I would be most interested in meeting colleagues who have interests in similar areas or who would be interested in exploring potential collaborative research/practice.

Dr Julie Hyde

Chemistry

julie.hyde@sheffield.ac.uk

Julie is one of the recipients of the Senate Award for Sustained Excellence, which celebrates an ongoing commitment to outstanding teaching. Nominees are noted for using their expertise to make a significant contribution to University life.
Julie has dedicated her career to promoting excellence in learning and teaching, in and beyond the Department of Chemistry. Since 2011, she has led our pioneering partnership with Nanjing Tech University, providing a unique joint BSc Chemistry programme for Chinese students. A Senior University Teacher, Dr Hyde specialises in teaching Laboratory Chemistry (across all sections Organic, Inorganic and Physical). She also manages her department’s schools and colleges outreach programme, which offers an exciting opportunity for local students to try out chemistry in a university environment.
Julie said of her award: “To take a group of students at the start of their degrees then help them develop over the years and see them successfully graduate is great. Over the last few years, to teach students from the joint BSc programme in Sheffield and Nanjing Tech in China, and be a part of their development towards graduation, is fantastic. The importance of teaching and helping our students develop during their learning is a process that lasts for several years and means a lot to me.
"I am dedicated to trying to help my students from a variety of backgrounds achieve their aims. I am delighted to have been awarded the Senate Award. To be recognised for my dedication to chemistry over the years and for my laboratory teaching to students abroad whose first language is not English, as well as students at home, is wonderful."

Dr Andy Inch

Andy Inch

Urban Studies and Planning

A.Inch@sheffield.ac.uk

Through my teaching experiences I have developed a belief that learning works best when it is an active, continuous and collaborative process. One of the most interesting things about town planning as a discipline is that it requires us to learn through engagement with real people and places, critically exploring how different types of knowledge can be used to address complex societal challenges.

The Westfield Action Research Project is rooted in a strong belief that universities and the discipline of planning share a responsibility to help create a more just and sustainable world. The project aims to explore how we might begin to realise those responsibilities through a long-term partnership between the department of Urban Studies and Planning and the community of Westfield, offering active research and learning opportunities for all of those involved, students, community members and university staff.

Dr Frazer Jarvis

Frazer Jarvis

Mathematics and Statistics

A.F.Jarvis@sheffield.ac.uk

Teaching has always been central to my career, and I enjoy being challenged in teaching familiar and unfamiliar material, using new or standard methods. I have always been enthusiastic to play a role in student-centred administrative positions in the department, previously as Director of Teaching, and now as Senior Tutor. I was delighted to be part of the project to make these videos of Engineering mathematics; it has been an enjoyable experience to be part of this team. More widely, it is a pleasure to work with colleagues, both academic and in the support team, in trying to provide a high quality experience for all of our students.

Mr Daniel Jary

Dr Daniel Jary

Architecture

d.jary@sheffield.ac.uk

Daniel has developed the first year architecture course into an exciting, stretching programme embracing innovative teaching methods and inquiry based learning. He is strongly committed to the cause of widening participation, working with the Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust to encourage a wider community to consider a career in architecture.

Dr Andrew Johnson

Dr Andrew Johnson

Mechanical Engineering

a.r.johnson@sheffield.ac.uk

Since joining the University in 1985 I have made continuous efforts to develop and deliver high quality teaching. My main current teaching is First Year Mechanics Modules to a wide range of Engineering Departments. St George's Church looks very full with over 320 students in it! I have also conscientiously undertaken a wide range of teaching related administrative tasks, at Departmental, Faculty and University level including Departmental Director of Teaching. For the past six years I have been the Undergraduate Admissions Tutor. Six years ago the department had a major recruitment problem which was turned round. Now I am trying to manage a 75% increase in applications during the last two years which has moved us to a selecting rather than a recruiting department.

Dr Bob Johnston

Johnston

Archaeology

r.johnston@sheffield.ac.uk

My teaching is guided by a belief that university education can be personally and collectively empowering. It should transform us, as communities within and beyond the university, through the knowledge, experiences and critical perspectives we gain from learning. I have sought to put this into practice by using new technologies (such as handheld devices) to increase students’ independence while learning during fieldwork, embedding modules in ‘live’ community-based research projects, and promoting employability and work placements within the curriculum.

Dr Bryn Jones

Bryn Jones

Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

b.l.jones@sheffield.ac.uk

Everyone has their own philosophy concerning the best way of learning. From an Engineering perspective I believe the best way is through playing with hardware in order to develop confidence in applying the many theoretical concepts that our students encounter. With this in mind I was keen to provide our students their own portable lab-kits to play with off-campus and in their own time. Designing an engaging hardware system and building one hundred of these kits under tight cost and time constraints has been one of the most challenging tasks I have faced and it would not have been possible without the exceptional skill and dedication of colleagues in the Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering. I am proud of what we have achieved, and the unique teaching platform our department now possesses for enhancing the learning experience of our students.

Dr Simon Jones

Dr Simon Jones

Chemistry

simon.jones@sheffield.ac.uk

I suppose my areas of expertise and interest would be in developing teaching resources and adapting styles to meet the changing needs of our incoming students. This means looking forward to use of modern technologies and appreciating more how students learn. I've been extensively involved in the past with science communication and schools liaison and have been involved with undergraduate admissions and recruitment for a long time.

Dr Myles Jones

Dr Myles Jones

Psychology

m.jones@sheffield.ac.uk

Teaching of Neuroscience and Psychology at undergraduate and post-graduate levels. Implementation of enquiry based learning methods and embedding of information literacy within the curriculum.

Professor Petros Kefalas

Petros KefalasComputer Science (International Faculty)

kefalas@city.academic.gr

The Senate Award for Leadership in Learning & Teaching is a tremendous honour. I am in debt to my colleagues who nominated me as well as to the rest of my colleagues at the International Faculty whose work and efforts also indirectly reflect this nomination. I am honoured to be entrusted with the role of the Director of L&T by the administration of the International Faculty, CITY College in Thessaloniki, Greece. We have a vision to contribute to the development of South-East Europe and promote the University´s reputation and high standards of education provision.
My approach has always been to establish an open dialogue with each individual and find together innovative solutions to any obstacles and challenges. My role is to encourage risk taking and experimentation in T&L and assessment but at the same time to maintain balance, fairness and consistency. I believe that the best way to motivate academics and urge them to engage in L&T is by providing the appropriate mentoring support and by creating a community of peers that are open to self-reflection. My love for teaching is how everything started and the spark that keeps the flame lit up. Getting in class either as a teacher or student is something that I still do with excitement. While discussing with my colleagues about their experiences, I feel that I am still able to add some "spice" to their practices, affecting the way they perceive education. I feel happy as I watch them growing mature and inviting others to this exciting journey of T&L.

Dr Stephen Kellett

Dr Stephen Kellett

Psychology

s.kellett@sheffield.ac.uk

My learning and teaching strengths would be based on 12 years full time clinical practice in psychotherapy in the NHS enabling me to make the teaching of such skills as realistic as possible for trainees.

Naomi Kent

Kent

kentn@parliament.uk

Working in Parliament’s Outreach Service, I manage the Houses of Parliament’s Higher Education programme, which aims to encourage and support universities to teach about Parliament. In partnership with the Department of Politics at the University of Sheffield, we developed and delivered a new “Parliamentary Studies” module, which is the first co-taught module formally approved by the Houses of Parliament and is now being delivered UK-wide as part of many Politics degrees. The collaboration between Parliament and the University of Sheffield brought about this innovative way of teaching, where seminars are delivered both by academics and practitioners from within Parliament.

Mrs Ingrid King

King

Psychology

i.king@sheffield.ac.uk

I teach on the IAPT PWP and High Intensity courses, am an accredited Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapist, practising in the NHS, and also deliver Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapy, Training and Supervision in private practice. I have over 18 years experience using evidence based approaches, with people experiencing psychological health problems, and have also worked on public health projects designed to promote mental health.

Ms Marie Kinsey

Ms Marie Kinsey

Journalism

m.kinsey@sheffield.ac.uk

My personal area of teaching expertise is broadcast journalism and we put together a successful application in the collaboration category so I can say, I hope, useful things about team working.

Dr Janine Kirby

Dr Janine Kirby

Neuroscience

J.kirby@sheffield.ac.uk

My teaching interests are primarily focused on PGT and I have led modules, pathways and now an MSc Course. My interests include using a variety of teaching and assessment methods, encouraging student participation and enthusing and inspiring students about biomedical research, particularly through their own research project experiences.

Dr Willy Kitchen

Dr Willy Kitchen

Institute for Lifelong Learning

w.kitchen@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Dr Terry Lamb

Lamb

School of Education

t.lamb@sheffield.ac.uk

Student voice is central to both my teaching and my research. I strive to provide learning opportunities for students to have a voice in their own learning, identifying their own learning needs and negotiating ways of meeting them individually and collaboratively. The use of portfolio assessment, the centrality of students’ critical reflection, the encouragement of action research, and the facilitation of active learning in groups are all examples of this. As most of my students are themselves teachers, I encourage them to reflect on their own learning and its implications for their professional practice, with a view to encouraging them to listen to their own learners’ voices. This is fundamentally about inclusion, and the creation of a learning environment in which learners understand that they can learn from each other and that diversity provides a rich opportunity for learning and enjoyment. As a linguist, this extends to the promotion of inclusive, multilingual spaces, in which plurilingualism can be valorised and celebrated.

Professor Paul Latreille

Professor Paul Latreille

Management School

p.latreille@sheffield.ac.uk

I’ve always been passionate about teaching: it’s a rare and exciting privilege to have the opportunity to join and hopefully guide students in their personal learning journeys, on what should be ideally be shared adventures of discovery. Of course it’s sometimes easy to forget when confronted by a lecture theatre of two, three or even four hundred students that, as Paul Baker puts it: “The moments of the class must belong to the student – not the students, but to the very undivided student. You don’t teach a class. You teach a student.” And it’s from that recognition that my long-standing interest in pedagogical innovation, and technology enhanced learning in particular, are driven.

I’ve tried to bring something of that philosophy to my role as the Management School’s Associate Dean for Learning & Teaching. We’re a large department comprising diverse subject areas with correspondingly different needs. So while providing strategic direction in this area, I see my role as being primarily to support colleagues in their endeavours and development. That means giving them permission to try new things, support and mentoring where they need and want it, and celebrating the many successes of an outstanding team of academic and professional services staff in the School. This award reflects their efforts and so is shared with them.

Professor Roger Lewis

Dr Roger Lewis

Mechanical Engineering

roger.lewis@sheffield.ac.uk

Interdisciplinary teaching: getting students from different disciplines (engineers, architects, landscape architects etc.) to work together in teams on design projects. Collaborative teaching: teaching modules as part of a team of academics to make teaching more efficient and ensuring students can get access to the right expertise. Design teaching: practical projects involving design and make exercises.

Dr Kath Linehan

Dr Kath Linehan

Biomedical Science

k.linehan@sheffield.ac.uk


  • Developing teaching strategies that enable students in large class sizes to receive an individually tailored learning experience.
  • Independent learning.
  • Researching and implementing teaching strategies that are effective in facilitating university students to learn independently.
  • The use of technology, such as pod and screencasting, in the teaching of gross anatomy.

Dr Katherine Linehan

(Collaborative Activities)

Katherine LinehanBiomedical Science

k.linehan@sheffield.ac.uk

Inclusion is key to my teaching and learning philosophy. I have spent 20 years in Higher Education designing classes that appeal to all learners. My aim is to tailor the learning resources and teaching sessions so that they are student-focused, engaging and accessible to all. This promotes a positive learning environment where the contribution of the individual is valued irrelevant of the size of the cohort.
Over the 14 years I have worked at TUOS I’ve enjoyed working closely with colleagues both at an institutional and national level to develop their own teaching practices. Most recently I have designed a postgraduate course in Human Anatomy and Education which will train a new generation of Anatomy graduates how to teach this very old and traditional discipline in modern and innovative ways!

Dr Henriette Louwerse

Dr Henriette Louwerse

Germanic Studies

h.louwerse@sheffield.ac.uk

Interinstitutional collaboration and 24/7 learning. Using technology to enhance learning and motivation and generally, what can we do to involve the students in the process of learning and reflection on learning without losing hardcore knowledge: we still need to know things after all. I am rather into cultural translation too, i.e. developing cultural sensitivity among our students as part of the curriculum.

Mrs Helen Macdonald

MacDonald

Psychology

h.macdonald@sheffield.ac.uk

I have been a clinician, supervisor and teacher in Cognitive-Behavioural Psychotherapy for adult mental health, (using research-based therapies ), for over 25 years, and our students and partners in the NHS and third sector particularly value the 'real world' experience we can bring to the teaching and learning. When not teaching at the university I am contributing on a national and international level to developing and maintaining quality in delivery and training in Cognitive-Behavioural Psychotherapies, and I maintain a special interest in persistent pain and occupational rehabilitation.

Professor Sheila MacNeil

Professor Sheila MacNeil

Materials Science and Engineering

s.macneil@sheffield.ac.uk

As a research scientist who thoroughly enjoys the challenge of tackling problems which lie on the interface between Engineering and Medicine I know how important it is to learn to work with colleagues from a range of disciplines. To inspire students to engage with the world of problem solving its important to give students real and topical challenges that requires that students think creatively and learn to respect and use the input of colleagues who have different skills and experiences to themselves.

Dr Stephen Makin

Dr Stephen Makin

Philosophy

s.makin@sheffield.ac.uk

I find that the best approach to teaching is to have as few barriers as possible between myself and the students. Teaching and learning go well when pursued as a co-operative enterprise, particularly in a subject like philosophy, and I like to think that I have got as much out of my twenty five years teaching philosophy as my students have.

Ms Victoria Mann

Victoria MannEnglish Language Teaching Centre

v.e.mann@sheffield.ac.uk

I work in the ELTC, as the academic director of the SpLD tutorial service. I specialise in SpLDs and EAP, the SpLD tutorial as a transformative space, and dyscalculia. I am very proud and pleased to work at an institution that consistently provides opportunities for collaboration and development. This project has enabled me to work with experts in different disciplines from across the university in order to respond to a real issue that affects students and student progress.
The impact of this project is that maths anxiety workshops are now embedded in the DLL programme and in the 301 academic skills programme, enabling students to access support and work on developing strategies to counter maths anxiety. Equally, there is support for staff in the form of supporting the supporters’ maths anxiety workshops and resources. I very much look forward to continuing to work on this topic with my colleagues.

Dr Helen Marriott

Dr Helen Marriott

Infection and Immunity

h.m.marriott@sheffield.ac.uk

My main teaching interest is the development of students' basic academic skills, including practical biological laboratory training. I am currently developing, in collaboration with Dawn Teare in ScHARR, teaching materials with the aim of engaging the students in learning statistics with the emphasis on providing context in which to place the statistical theory.

Dr Sam Marsh

Sam Marsh

Mathematics and Statistics

S.J.Marsh@sheffield.ac.uk

I am far from having a well-formed philosophy on teaching. My main thought is that good teaching requires significant effort, and that effort itself is almost enough. Certainly, my experience is that students respond well to human interaction, and work harder when they can tell someone is taking an interest in them.

I have recently been involved with implementing a flipped approach to teaching mathematics, using videos to supplement face-to-face teaching with encouraging results. I think it likely that video will have an increasingly prominent role in higher education teaching, and figuring out the best way of using it is an exciting challenge.

Mrs Ellen Marshall

Ellen Marshall301 Student Skills & Development Centre

ellen.marshall@sheffield.ac.uk

I have been providing statistics support at the University of Sheffield since 2011 and teaching statistics to a variety of disciplines since 2007. I am passionate about teaching statistics and helping students overcome the barriers to understanding
statistics and undertaking quantitative research. A fear or dislike of maths and statistics is commonplace and although I have developed methods for successfully teaching statistics to students of any discipline, further research was required to
address the issues of anxiety which was clearly detrimental to performance. Receiving individual support which allows students to ask questions, receive feedback and progress at their own pace is thought to be the most effective strategy for overcoming maths anxiety but many anxious students do not
avail themselves of maths support due to maths avoidance.

Working as a multi-disciplinary team enabled us to successfully address the issues within and outside of the curriculum as well as drawing on the expertise of the individual team members.  Awareness and recognition of maths anxiety is the first step to overcoming it and any member of staff can support students with this phase. A number of resources for students and staff are available on our webpage https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/mash/anxiety.

I will be leaving the University to work at Sheffield Hallam in August 2017 but am hoping to continue working with colleagues at both institutions (ellen.marshall@shu.ac.uk).

Dr Michelle Marshall

Michelle Marshall

Academic Unit of Medical Education

M.Marshall@sheffield.ac.uk

I am Director of Learning and Teaching for the undergraduate medical degree (MBChB). I am passionate about education and love working with our medical students. They motivate and inspire me through their enthusiasm for medicine and I hope that in return I contribute to their development, enabling them to reach their full potential as learners. I believe that good education involves creating a stimulating and sometimes challenging environment that supports and facilitates learning and enables students to grow and develop into independent learners. I am particularly interested in interprofessional education and staff development and have extensive experience in these areas. For me, learning is a two way process, where we learn together and from each other and I wouldn’t want it any other way.

Professor Nigel Mathers

Nigel Mathers

Academic Unit of Primary Medical Care

N.Mathers@sheffield.ac.uk

I am delighted to have been nominated for, and to have received, the Senate Award for Departmental Leadership in Learning and Teaching. “Rumours of the death of general practice have been much exaggerated!” General practice has often been regarded as something of a “Cinderella” specialty in the University and I am very pleased that our long-standing substantial contribution to the medical undergraduate curriculum has been recognised by this Award. I share this Award with over 100 ‘unsung heroes’ of our Practice teaching network who have, for many years, willingly provided clinical placements for our students. I also wish to share this Award with the 14 core teaching staff of our Unit and the 18 small group tutors who come into the University faithfully every week to teach our students how to become expert medical generalists. Our students are taught a biopsychosocial model of care and the importance of asking themselves the question “what sort of person has the disease?” as well as “what sort of disease does this person have”? General practice is the great “risk sink” of the NHS and we hope, by our teaching, to engender in our students the ability to manage uncertainty in the clinical encounter. In addition, we hope that following their time with us, our students will also understand how to deliver person-centred, ‘holistic’ (treating mind and body as one) care to people with multimorbidity and long-term conditions within their context of families and communities. To be a good general practitioner, requires the skills of not only managing complex clinical problems at an early stage of presentation but also how to manage long-term therapeutic relationships with our patients. We hope that students leave the Academic Unit of Primary Medical Care understanding this and the intellectual challenges of being a good GP. Finally, the clinical consultation in general practice also offers our students great opportunities to understand how research can inform clinical teaching and clinical teaching informs research. Thank you to everyone who has contributed and continues to contribute to the delivery of high-quality undergraduate clinical teaching in the community. This Award is for us all.

Dr Bill McDonnell

Dr Bill McDonnell

English Literature, Language and Linguistics

w.g.mcdonnell@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Dr Andrew McGonigle

McGonigle

Geography

a.mcgonigle@sheffield.ac.uk

I teach on various themes within Physical Geography, in particular concerning my own research, which is focused on developing new approaches for monitoring volcanic activity. In doing so I try and capture in some small way the uniqueness of what a University is (or should be): namely an institution with an integrated mission to teach and research. By helping the students see themselves as becoming researchers, even from the very onset of their degrees, I also hope to instil in them a sense of how absolutely critical this graduate attribute is for their lives, careers, and contribution to the good of society at large.

Professor Claire McGourlay

Dr Claire McGourlay

Law

c.mcgourlay@sheffield.ac.uk

Constantly endeavouring to be to be more than an academic who nurtures a passionate interest in the law, Claire strives to develop approaches to teaching across a number of mediums that influence, motivate and inspire students to learn. As well as the traditional lecture and seminar formats she champions distinct and diverse teaching styles and methods to ensure everyone is supported and given the opportunity to excel. These include introducing video activities into the module 'Introduction to Legal Process'; promoting the use of portfolios and e-portfolios through 'FreeLaw' and ‘Miscarriages of Justice' and bringing passion and dedication to growing and further establishing a range of internationally-acclaimed student-led pro bono projects.

Claire was the first person in the Faculty of Social Sciences to be promoted to Professor of Student Education in 2013.

Dr Martina McGuinness

Dr Martina McGuiness

Management Studies

m.mcguinness@sheffield.ac.uk

My areas of interest include skills development in undergraduates - this year I am running a project on skills development in level2/3 students using money from the last tranche of CILASS funding. Another area is effective assessment and feedback in large groups.

Dr Dominic McHugh

Dominic McHugh

Music

D.McHugh@sheffield.ac.uk

I am an historical musicologist, with particular expertise in Broadway and Hollywood musicals. As a teacher, I am to bring my passion for music to my students in as diverse and accessible a way as possible. I take pride in helping and encouraging students with learning difficulties such as dyslexia, and am committed to inclusivity. I have embraced a range of learning techniques throughout the curriculum and try to be as innovative as possible, such as creating Graduate Study Days for the postgraduate community in Music; bringing together students from across the university in a series of reconstructions of long-lost musicals (a project that has received wide media interest); and in general by being as supportive and as student-centred as I can

Mrs Gayle McKay

Mrs Gayle McKay

Dyslexia Support Service

g.mckay@sheffield.ac.uk

As a member of Learning and Teaching Services, Gayle was part of Engineering’s faculty support team helping to organise the Global Engineering Challenge. Gayle is now the University’s Disability Transition Officer working within the Disability and Dyslexia Support Service and providing support to Disabled students both pre-entry and during their course.

Dr Robert McKay

Dr Robert Mckay

English Literature, Language and Linguistics

r.mckay@sheffield.ac.uk

In addition to my main focuses on researching feedback practice in essay-based subjects, and in constructivist educational theory. I'm especially interested in trying to find innovative ways to teach undergraduate research skills and academic skills generally alongside subject-specific learning. I've also long been interested in ways Literature students can learn "beyond the book", for example I run research field trips in non-literary contexts (e.g. art galleries, museums, zoos).

Mr Luke Miller

Luke Miller

ScHARR

l.miller@sheffield.ac.uk

I am particularly interested in how technology can be used to assist in the design and delivery of teaching, learning and assessment. I also have a keen interest in web accessibility and usability. I am involved in using and evaluating new technologies and have experience in learning object development and online and offline resource creation.

One of my ongoing aims is to `upskill´ and educate staff in the use of educational technologies to help enhance their areas of teaching practice through bespoke staff development sessions and one-to-one support and advice.

I have more recently become heavily involved in designing and delivering MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses).

Dr Susan Molyneux-Hodgson

Susan Molyneux-Hodgson

Sociological Studies

s.hodgson@sheffield.ac.uk

My teaching expertise runs across philosophy of social sciences, science & society and doctoral research training. This work is underpinned by ideas that I draw from my research on the sociology of knowledge production, including the importance of developing students’ sense of belonging to a collective, and the value of learning about, and learning alongside, other disciplines. I aim to try out different ways of using these ideas in how I manage, design and conduct teaching. Film shows, theatre trips, lab visits, chalk, post-its, blogs and presentations all have a place but mostly teaching is about listening and then finding a way to work from there.

Professor Nick Monk

Nick Monk

Mathematics and Statistics

N.Monk@sheffield.ac.uk

I believe maths is too important to be left just to mathematicians, so I relish opportunities to teach maths to scientists and engineers. This brings the challenge of trying to get beyond the formalism to the underlying principles of what is being taught, but can be highly rewarding. Creativity is central to intellectual endeavour, and I try to make it central to all my teaching.

Professor John Moreland

John Moreland

Archaeology

j.moreland@sheffield.ac.uk

I am very proud to be Head of the Department where I studied as an undergraduate. I am also extremely happy to have had the opportunity, as Head, to work with colleagues to embed external engagement and practical experience in our curriculum. As the first of my family to go to University I am committed to working with and supporting those who have traditionally thought that University was ‘not for them’. I am a passionate advocate for my discipline (with its mixture of discovery, practical training, ‘learning through doing’, and teamwork) as the best training-ground for the world of work or further study. I believe fundamentally that working with our students to discover the wonder and difference of the past, and to explore the ‘deep time’ that Archaeology uncovers, contributes to their (and our) development as knowledgeable and tolerant citizens.

Dr Trish Murray

Dr Trish Murray

Faculty of Engineering on secondment from Learning and Teaching Services

p.b.murray@sheffield.ac.uk

Seconded from LeTS into the Faculty of Engineering, my remit is to work with staff to develop more effective feedback and assessment practices. This has however opened up into work on the Global Engineering Challenge and the follow on second year cross- faculty interdisciplinary week which will happen in 2013. I am particularly interested in how students become tuned into assessment and credit banking and whether we are able to erode this and re-inject an interest in learning.

Dr Nicola Newman

N Newman

Management School

N.Newman@sheffield.ac.uk

I love my job as a university teacher in marketing. My teaching philosophy is not only to excite my students about marketing but show them how academia and practice meet. Marketing is all around us and therefore this provides me with an abundance of real life examples for students use in understanding the marketing theories, strategies and concepts I teach. To help me to provide this balance between practice and theory I like to experiment with new learning technologies. This has included personal response systems, peer assessment software, marketing simulation games and flipped teaching. My constant aim is to improve our students learning experience whether this is by championing the use of electronic submission and marking or implementing developments in the curriculum such as the addition of an unfair means test and allowing first year students to see one of their Turnitin reports to help improve new students understanding of plagiarism and unfair means. Finally, I strongly believe in the importance of passing on best practice within my own department and outside and have therefore taken an active role in CiCS TELFests and inter-departmental learning and teaching events.

Dr Felix Ng

Dr Felix Ng

Geography

f.ng@sheffield.ac.uk

Regarding my teaching, most of it is in Physical Geography
and involves 'contact hour'-based lectures, seminars, tutorials
and dissertation supervision.

Dr Martin Nicklin

Dr Martin Nicklin

Infection and Immunity

m.nicklin@sheffield.ac.uk

My academic areas are genetics, immunology and molecular biology. Outside that area I have experience in developing and integrating a largish MSc with a large overseas majority and a broad group of teachers. Novel teaching and assessment methods interest me.

Professor Rod Nicolson

Professor Rod Nicolson

Psychology

r.nicolson@sheffield.ac.uk

I have been lucky enough to combine business with pleasure in University Learning and Teaching. As a psychologist researching child, student and adult learning abilities and disabilities I have investigated issues including: use of new technology in learning (from BBC micro to iPad); the three major brain systems of learning; and the use of 'deliberate action learning' to develop a regional Academy of leaders. Most important, I've had the opportunity of thinking how to apply the ivory tower views of learning in the real world.

Mr Peter Odell

Peter OdellLaw

p.j.odell@sheffield.ac.uk

My practice is based on supporting students in their development as independent learners.

Dr Rosie Parnell

Dr Rosie Parnell

Architecture

r.parnell@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Mr James Pearson

Pearson

History

james.pearson@sheffield.ac.uk

James has worked in the Department of History as an Information Officer since 2003. His primary role is to provide IT support, maintain the Department website and to support e-learning resources. James' role in learning and teaching is to train students and staff in the use of digital technologies and to offer support and advice. To date such projects have included interactive websites, maps, videos and databases.

Professor Anne Peat

Professor Anne Peat

Nursing and Midwifery

a.m.peat@sheffield.ac.uk

I have taken the lead on a number of curriculum development initiatives including the on-line Masters in Midwifery programme and Problem Based Learning. In 2006 I was appointed Dean of School of Nursing and Midwifery. I am an experienced chair of the university Independent Evaluation of Teaching/Periodic Reviews. I am committed to the career advancement of female academics in Higher Education and over the last two years I have been an active member of the Female Academic Progression Steering Group, Impact Mentoring Scheme designed to support junior female academics and the senior academic mentoring scheme. I was awarded a personal chair in 2008 through the teaching route.

Dr Martin Pitt

Pitt

Chemical and Biological Engineering

m.j.pitt@sheffield.ac.uk

I came to academia after some time in industry as a chemical engineer, and treated teaching like any other engineering project. That is, I researched the process of education and worked on plans based on my understanding of the raw material input (students) and the product (graduates) I was expected to produce. However, as biological entities, it is important that the students are placed in a nourishing environment for educational growth to take place and with sufficient agitation to keep them active, but not excessive stress which would result in failure.

Professor Stephanie Pitts

Dr Stephanie Pitts

Music

s.e.pitts@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Dr Katie Powell

Katie Powell

ScHARR

k.powell@sheffield.ac.uk

My research has focussed on health inequalities and I have a particular interest in the ways in which reproduction of disadvantage and deprivation can be influenced by social interventions. I am interested in supporting students to develop an understanding of the social processes that shape experiences of health and in using innovative teaching approaches to engage learners in this topic.

Dr Alasdair Rae

Dr Alasdair Rae

Urban Studies and  Planning

a.j.rae@sheffield.ac.uk

Alasdair Rae seeks to make learning and teaching innovative, inspirational and enjoyable. He uses technology, ideas and good old fashioned enthusiasm in an attempt to achieve this.

Dr Amber Regis

Amber Regis

School of English

A.Regis@sheffield.ac.uk

In my teaching I seek to foster intellectual curiosity, to advocate for historical and literary enquiry as vital endeavours. I teach at all levels within the School of English—from Level 1 undergraduate through to doctoral research training—and it has been my privilege to support students as they become independent researchers, and to provide opportunities for them to work outside the classroom. The latter has taken the form of field trips and visits to libraries and archives, but it is also an integral part of my role as convenor of the MA work placement. I am committed to inclusivity and collegiality as key pedagogic principles, and I seek to build syllabi that explore and celebrate cultural diversity and difference—both in the past as well as the present.

Professor Peter Robinson

Professor Peter Robinson

Clinical Dentistry

peter.g.robinson@sheffield.ac.uk

Developed a network of placements for delivering clinical education in primary dental care reconciling needs of students, school, supervising clinicians and NHS. Set up several Masters Programmes, including cross-School.

Dr Louise Robson

Dr Louise Robson

Biomedical Science

l.robson@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Miss Angela Rollinson

Rollinson

Psychology

a.rollinson@sheffield.ac.uk

I took over the administrative tasks associated with the arrival of the two new IAPT courses in preparation for their commencement in October 2008 following 7 years experience working on the DClin Psy course. I have developed and expanded the IAPT administrator role as the courses continue through their annual cycle from selection and registration through to graduation.

Dr Anthony Rossiter

Dr Anthony Rossiter

Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

j.a.rossiter@sheffield.ac.uk

Main interests are adoption, creation and dissemination of best practice, especially with regard to enabling efficient quality enhancements and effective use of technology.

Dr Jennifer Rowson

Dr Jennifer Rowson

Mechanical Engineering

j.rowson@sheffield.ac.uk

Throughout her various teaching roles, Jen has made a very positive difference to the student learning experience, focusing on empowerment for the student, teaching them the skills to learn for themselves at their own pace and build an enquiring engineering mind. Part of Jen's work has been focused on feedback, how to give it, how to understand it, how to teach students how to recognise it and use it; so integrating it into the student learning process.

Mr Satwinder Samra

Mr Satwinder Samra

Architecture

s.samra@sheffield.ac.uk

Satwinder ran Year 3 of the undergraduate studio programme for the years 2000 to 2010, during this period he evolved a course that was inspiring, well-structured, challenging and rigorous. His enterprise and advocacy have been instrumental in evolving projects in Castleford with Channel 4 (2004), the success of the recent School Centenary (2008) and the production of the School Exhibition Catalogue (2010).

Dr James Shaw

Dr James Shaw

History

j.e.shaw@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Dr Jon Shaw

Dr Jon Shaw

Infection and Immunity

j.g.shaw@sheffield.ac.uk

My experience is in postgraduate (PGT) selection, especially for overseas students. I have had eight years plus experience and over that time we have refined our selection with regard to countries and Universities. In collaboration with the International office I have interviewed and counselled potential applicants about the University and/or our specific MSc course in both India and Iran.My main teaching interest is the development of students' basic academic skills, including practical biological laboratory training. I am currently developing, in collaboration with Dawn Teare in ScHARR, teaching materials with the aim of engaging the students in learning statistics with the emphasis on providing context in which to place the statistical theory.

Mrs Jane Shields

Mrs Jane Shields

Medical School

j.shields@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Dr Minna Shkul

Minna ShkulPhilosophy

m.shkul@sheffield.ac.uk

I am deeply honoured by Senate Award recognition. To match my delight in this esteemed professional accolade, I was awarded the Liberation and Diversity Award in Student Union Academic Awards this year, as well. It is amazing to have work on Equality and Diversity recognised by both Senior Leadership of the University, and by its students’ Union.

My research and personal learning journey has taken me from the world of antiquity and study of human religiosity to examine contemporary life and human experience in its rich diversity. This diversity has become an inspiration for my work at Sheffield, and I am delighted to receive a Senate Fellowship in recognition for diversifying Religion and Biblical studies curriculum, and launching Sheffield’s LGBT* Studies module, which is a transdisciplinary collaboration that brings together professional staff and academics, and students from all faculties. Although these fields – religion, gender and sexuality - may appear very different, they are similar in their focus on different aspects of identity, culture and society. My teaching on these areas continues to develop different aspects of my pedagogical philosophy. Firstly, it is important to include representation of minorities in core modules and mainstream syllabi, to ensure underrepresented communities are not positioned on the margins of the academia, only, or assumed to be areas of interest only for the minorities themselves. Hence for example, the study of religion needs to include representation of minorities, and topics like ethnicity, class, ability, gender and sexuality. Secondly, dedicated modules on topics, like LGBT* Studies, foster learning outside traditional hegemonies, and inspire scholarship on new areas. It is delightful that the University provides these varied learning experiences, and recognises the importance of diversifying 21st century curriculum in Higher Education.

Mr Jason Slade

Jascon Slade

Urban Studies and  Planning

jmslade1@sheffield.ac.uk

Learning and teaching in the social sciences and the humanities cannot but involve more than filling empty vessels with knowledge. This is because regardless of whether we are university students, teachers or people who have never set foot in a university we are already fully immersed in the subject of study – our collective life. One of the most exciting aspects of the Westfield Action Research Project is that it seeks to make the most of this; it acknowledges that we are all, in our different ways already experts and it seeks to bring university and community actors together to share that expertise, learning from one another in a spirit of mutuality and co-operation. Beyond this both the privilege and responsibility of being in a department of planning is that by definition we have to put these varieties of expertise to work to make the places where we live and work better. My own interests, then, are in the transformational potential of both this process and the understanding of knowledge on which it is based, and the positive change this might realise not just for students but also for the university and the various communities in the city that houses it.

Dr Tom Slatter

Dr Tom Slatter

Mechanical Engineering

tom.slatter@sheffield.ac.uk

Tom attempts to inspire students to achieve to the best of their abilities, regardless of their starting point, and often uses his industrial links to help achieve this by showing the students what engineering looks like at the end of all the exams.

Tom strives to help students to learn to be flexible, adaptable, inquisitive, responsible and reflective in their approach to learning. An example of this is the work he does in helping the Formula Student team successfully build a single-seater race car every year.

Dr Matthew Sleat

Dr Matthew Sleat

Politics

m.sleat@sheffield.ac.uk

I am a Lecturer in Political Theory and the Deputy Director of Postgraduate Taught in the Department of Politics. I see the need for any modern University to excel in both teaching and research and believe that it is only right that they are judged on both. As such I have always been keen to employ original approaches to teaching, including the establishment of a regular ‘Political theory through the lens’ film series with the Politics Society and the running of our Work Based Learning Dissertations.

Mr Dan Smith

Dan Smith

ScHARR

d.d.smith@sheffield.ac.uk

I have worked as a Learning Technologist at the university since 2010. My role mainly involves supporting staff in getting materials and activities online. I like being helpful and tinkering with digital technologies, which works out really well given my job.

Mr Robert Spark

Rob SparkProjects & Development

rob.spark@sheffield.ac.uk

As the Online Learning Team’s Educational Content Developer, I produce a range of audio visual material for a wide variety of platforms. This includes films, animation and viral marketing content.
I have previously worked in secondary education and the creative industries and have an MA in Sound Design from the University of York’s School of Theatre, Film and Television. I bring specialist knowledge of film making and post production to the team.
It is rewarding to know that I am using my skills to bring University of Sheffield learning and teaching to anyone in the world.

Professor Paul Speight

Professor Paul Speight

Clinical Dentistry

p.speight@sheffield.ac.uk

As Dean of the School of Clinical Dentistry, I lead a research intensive and successful department, but I constantly remind all my staff that it is the students who are at the heart of what we do. We deliver traditional research-led teaching, in a modern environment, but we have also developed systems which value pedagogy, reward teaching and provide career progression for teachers.

Dr Deborah Sporton

Deborah Sporton photo

Geography

d.sporton@sheffield.ac.uk

My teaching has been shaped by a strong commitment to three interrelated approaches to learning and teaching: Engaged learning, embedding employability into the curriculum and enterprise education. Engaged learning ensures that students understand and are able to relate their studies to the complexities of everyday life. As such I have helped introduce and shape a suite of international development Masters Courses that combine theory with practice and place a strong emphasis on field work NGO internships, external engagement and employability. I am also committed to enterprise education and have established SIDshare, a student-run social enterprise, operating as an NGO within the University. SIDshare involves over 50 international stakeholder partners working in partnership with students from across the University who are mentored by ID professionals and supported through training. A recent major project has been the construction of a 30 bed Field Centre in the Kilimanjaro region in Tanzania with a local Tanzanian NGO that will contribute a source of unrestricted income to both organisations

Miss Rachel Staddon

Rachel StaddonLifelong Learning

r.v.staddon@sheffield.ac.uk

I joined the Department for Lifelong Learning in 2014, and I am the module convenor for our maths and chemistry modules. I believe that everyone should have access to enjoyable education at any level, and that creating this opportunity for students should be a top priority for universities.
The maths anxiety project is a collaborative effort to encourage student self-confidence and reduce their anxiety about maths. I am thrilled to be involved with the project, as many of DLL’s students come to university feeling anxious about maths, and this approach has been very helpful for them. Using current research on this topic, I developed a flipped-learning curriculum designed to make maths more accessible. This builds student confidence, and makes classes much more fun.
Overall, I am delighted with how the students responded to the flipped approach, and I hope to continue developing innovative curricula in the future.

Dr Richard Steadman-Jones

Dr Richard Steadman-Jones

English Literature, Language and Linguistics

r.d.steadman-jones@sheffield.ac.uk

RSJ teaches both undergraduate and postgraduate students in the School of English and has two main areas of interest in the sphere of L&T: (1) Inquiry and Information Literacy in the Arts and Humanities (an interest that he developed through his involvement with CILASS), and (2) the integration of creative and analytical approaches in English Studies.

Dr Hayley Stevenson

Dr Hayley Stevenson

Politics

h.stevenson@sheffield.ac.uk

I am a Reader in Politics and International Relations in the Department of Politics. Developing the Global Leadership Initiative with colleagues across the Faculty of Social Science has been one the most exciting and rewarding aspects of my career in teaching and research. It provides a unique opportunity for students to bring their studies “to life”: to attend a global summit or forum, and to observe and report on the challenges of global policy and decision-making. There is such a demand for critical, well-informed, and rapidly delivered analysis of many important international meetings, on topics ranging from climate change to financial stability, Ebola and food security. This program is already confirming that our students have the skills and motivation necessary to provide such analysis.

Dr Eleanor Stillman

Dr Eleanor Stillman

Mathematics and Statistics

e.c.stillman@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Dr Chris Stokes

Dr Chris Stokes

Clinical Dentistry

c.w.stokes@sheffield.ac.uk

I am currently very involved in the new MOLE2 launch, as I have been involved in the specification and implementation of the new system. I have always had an interest in any technologies to enable students to collaborate (such as group podcasts, wikis, online peer review tools). Away from the computers, I am also very interested in School's Outreach and Widening Participation, as I am a coordinator of the ADOPT Scheme in the Dental School.

Dr Peter Stordy

Dr Peter Stordy

iSchool

peter.stordy@sheffield.ac.uk

During the past six years I have worked with colleagues to improve the Level 1 student experience, improve undergraduate marketing, integrate inquiry-based learning within modules and develop the use e-portfolios, particularly for personal development planning (PDP) & assessment. These tasks are made easier because I now coordinate three of our Level 1 modules, five undergraduate degrees and departmental atypical workers. I have a particular interest in the issues surrounding group coursework, overseas student satisfaction and alternative pedagogies.

Professor Neil Strickland

N Strickland

Mathematics and Statistics

N.P.Strickland@sheffield.ac.uk

My main teaching interests involve applications of technology, especially systems for computer aided assessment that perform intelligent analysis of student answers and provide instant tailored feedback. Although there have been interesting developments of this type in recent years, I believe that we have barely scratched the surface of what is possible.

Mr Andy Tattersall

Andy Tattersall

ScHARR

a.tattersall@sheffield.ac.uk

My teaching interests lie in encouraging staff and students to use the many tools and technologies, quite often freely, available to aid them carry out research and collaboration within the academic and clinical setting. I teach within The School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) and the iSchool. I am a strong believer that technology, if used right, can be a great enabler and deliver transferable skills to our students. I try to create interactive, informal sessions that put the learner at ease with technology and many implications aligned with its use whilst retaining a keen eye on pedagogy. I am very interested in how we interact with technology and the implications, not only for us as learners but as humans. I came late to higher education but was inspired by some of my first university lecturers in how they imparted knowledge in an interesting and informal manner. I think teaching to such a diverse collection of students helps me stay on my toes and constantly assess what they want, need and how they might be feeling at a time when education is changing on a huge scale.

Professor Andrew Taylor

Professor Andrew Taylor

Politics

a.j.taylor@sheffield.ac.uk

My current research interests are the involved of the EU in South East europe, state failure, and the nature of borders in the contemporary world. I teach comparative politics, political analysis, and Europeanisation. In teaching my main focus is on employability, level 1 teaching, and supervising undergraduate research projects.

Dr Mark Taylor

Mark Taylor

School of Law

M.J.Taylor@sheffield.ac.uk

My general approach toward learning and teaching is collaborative: I understand University to be a shared learning experience and I aim for my students to apprentice with me, as I learn with them.

This approach has led to a number of initiatives within the School of Law over the years. I co-founded the student tutor scheme with second and third year students leading colloquia for incoming first years; a PGR colloquia series and annual research day to allow postgraduate students to better share their learning; and, a guest lecturer series for undergraduate students.

Outside of the University I have been involved in outreach and public engagement activity since 2003 and I’m committed to connecting the learning in University with the challenges facing society outside.

Dr Andrew Tyas

Dr Andrew Tyas

Civil and Structural Engineering

a.tyas@sheffield.ac.uk

Statement still to come.

Dr Rachel van Duyvenbode

Rachel van Duyvenbode photo

English

r.van-duyvenbode@sheffield.ac.uk

My teaching interests are rooted in exploring narratives of difference and I am motivated to create spaces for students to think, imagine and read the world differently. My curiosity about how to embed these principles in my practice has led to my involvement in a range of projects exploring forms of inclusive pedagogy: such as ‘flipping’ the English literature classroom; reflective and experiential learning; participatory methodologies and advocacy for more diversified and decolonised English Literature curriculum. A sustained commitment to curriculum diversity underpins also much of my work with local Schools and public engagement activities.

I offer specialist modules in African American literature and critical whiteness studies and I teach widely across the undergraduate and Masters degree programme. Recently, whilst working on a project exploring pedagogies of social justice education, I became interested in the work of the National SEED Project (Seeking Educational Equity and Diversity) based at Wellesley College in the USA. In 2015, I designed and facilitated the UK’s first SEED Project on inclusive curriculum at the University of Sheffield and the project has received national recognition for its innovation. Working with colleagues from across the University on the SEED project has been an incredibly rewarding experience for me personally and professionally. I am excited about the ongoing work of SEED here at the University of Sheffield and the transferrable methodologies and learning that mutually enhances my classroom practice and staff development work.

Dr Tim Vorley

Dr Tim Vorley

Management School

tim.vorley@sheffield.ac.uk

My motivation as an educator is to be inspiring and ensure that the learning experience is memorable for students. I enjoy pushing the boundaries of my teaching, combining classroom innovation with the real world as well as using technology to enhance learning. I have also been keen to develop international teaching and learning through participation in summer schools.

Dr Robert Wapshott

Robert Wapshott

Management School

r.wapshott@sheffield.ac.uk

My approach to learning and teaching incorporates academic research with students’ experiences and practitioner perspectives. Through this approach, classes explore relevant, real-life examples that stimulate students to reflect on their day-to-day practice and understanding of the world of work. My courses emphasise student-led learning, offering students opportunities to pursue questions that interest them. Seeing students engage with a topic and develop interesting questions of their own is something I find really rewarding.

Mrs Andrea Ward

Mrs Andrea Ward

Management School

a.ward@sheffield.ac.uk

I spent 20 years in large organisations and what I enjoyed most in those roles was enabling and creating the environment which supported people to grow to reach their potential. In my current role this is what gets me up in the morning.

Collaborating with students as part of their learning, as well as mine, and seeing those moments where students are getting that “ah-ha” moment of resonance and understanding which I believe to be the starting point for growing and learning.
The combination of experience and case studies always takes the lead in the way I teach, creating environments for students to apply knowledge to decipher and make sense of real world situations. As one student put it, “Andrea has not simply attempted to develop ‘employable’ people through her teaching, but she has ensured that we are ‘employed’”.

We are faced with large cohorts which could erode the student experience and I work really hard to make sure that my classrooms remain engaging and fun by using technology as a facilitator for this. Students do value these many methods and it always creates some novel answers that open up the teaching rooms with fun and laughter; an ideal ingredient for learning. Not only can technology enhance the student experience with pedagogic use, it also makes me more efficient with the way I operate, for example through the use of Turnitin Assignments and marking online I can manage large marking teams to ensure the quality of feedback for students. This approach has not only been utilised through L&T seminars for the Management School academics but also in Telfest activities, sharing hints and tips with fellow academics. It has also forced change in the software as the Turnitin system for iPad marking can now deal with large cohorts of 500+students, as well as being shortlisted for their Global Innovations for Students award.

We often look at impact from a research perspective, but there is nothing more impactful or sustainable than the memory and the impact that a teacher leaves with students throughout their learning and I always aim for it to be memorable.

Dr Ed Warminski

Ed Warminski

Chemistry

e.warminski@sheffield.ac.uk

The axiom “you can please some of the people all of the time, you can please all of the people some of the time, but you can’t please all of the people all of the time” (often attributed to poet John Lydgate) has lead me to adopt a teaching methodology which has variety as it's foundation.

My aim is to maximise the number of people I can engage with the subject of Chemistry by showing that there are many ways to tackle teaching and learning.

To incorporate many avenues of dissemination and activities as part of teaching is hard work but I have found this superior to a traditional delivery, it imparts an air of experimentation to what could be so easily reduced to being a disappointing (and inefficient) formal "information transfer". Of course this means that some of the people some of the time are taken out of their comfort zone, but that's not a bad thing - right?

Demonstrating that learning can be achieved in different ways and also through different media can engender a confidence within students so that they recognise that experimentation is acceptable and encouraged and that we trust them to explore and discover and then to practise their own best way of learning.

The implementation of diversity can also hint at the fact that most things are not set in stone and the "truth" very much has to be seen in a contextual sense. For most new science students, this is likely to be out of their comfort zone (and for those students, this challenge has to be a good thing to do).

Of course variety is only as expansive as the resources available and that is where having a strong and supportive team (as we have at Sheffield) is vital. I would go as far as to say I could not do what I do without the opinions and assistance of colleagues, secretaries, technicians, printers and all those upon which I rely-on to facilitate my endeavours. Above all, it is the sheer determination and hard work of our students that makes this place of work our University.

Dr Lorna Warren

Lorna Warren photo

Sociological Studies

l.warren@sheffield.ac.uk

An inherently nosey person, I’ve always wanted to find out what the world is like and I’ve never stopped being surprised by what I find. I try to share that curiosity with students by drawing on my research, asking them about their own lives, experiences and views, and getting them to do their own individual and collaborative research projects. As I’ve moved towards a more participatory approach to research on age and ageing, so I’ve increasingly sought methods of teaching that engage students directly with people whose lives are the focus of sociological study and policy intervention, that enable students to recognise themselves as potential subjects of study, and that lead them to critically investigate the investigators. Although I often fail to achieve it, my aim is to listen more and talk less. I enjoy being challenged by and learning from students.

Professor Philip Warren

Dr Philip Warren

Animal and Plant Sciences

p.warren@sheffield.ac.uk

Integration of IT into teaching; teaching data analysis and study design skills; use of VLEs and computer-based assessment tools; field-based teaching.

Ms Sheila Webber

Sheila Webber

Information School

S.Webber@sheffield.ac.uk

University education was transformative for me, and I think that it is important for universities to be places of growth, thinking, challenge and change. During my time in the Information School at Sheffield I have experienced teaching in many ways: collaborating with staff and students on projects such as CILASS (the Centre for Inquiry Based learning in the Arts and Social Sciences), or the Faculty of Social Sciences Challenge; exploring different approaches to learning and teaching; undertaking pedagogic research; learning from people from different cultures and countries. I relish delving into different environments (whether experienced virtually or face to face) to find out how they can challenge students and staff and inspire curiosity. I am passionate about my core research areas of information literacy and information behaviour, and I have been encouraged by the way that Sheffield University has increasingly acknowledged the value of producing information literate graduates. I look forward to more explorations of teaching, learning and literacies.

Dr Charles West

West

History

c.m.west@sheffield.ac.uk

Charles joined the University as a Lecturer in Medieval History in 2008. He enjoys teaching a wide variety of topics, ranging from the arrival of the Anglo-Saxons in Britain to the European crisis of the year 1000, and is particularly intrigued by the possibilities of digital technologies for not only enabling students' learning, but also for changing how they learn: when medieval history comes up against the modern world!

Dr Aidan While

Dr Aidan While

Urban Studies and  Planning

a.h.while@sheffield.ac.uk

My teaching seeks to promote (and provoke) critical debate about the processes and outcomes of decision-making.  The intention is to equip graduates with the skills, knowledge and understanding to make a difference in their future careers.  An important part of this approach is to create space for discussion and debate through workshops, seminars and student presentations.  My modules have been designed to allow the latest ideas to be brought directly into teaching.

Professor Paul White

Paul White

Geography

p.white@sheffield.ac.uk

Over a long career in the Department of Geography I have consistently tried to make my teaching interesting, thought-provoking, fun and ‘different’ by exposing students to new ways of thinking and learning. I teach contemporary topics relating to Europe – such as social exclusion, geopolitical issues, demographic change, or issues around ethnicity and identity. I try to enthuse students to take responsibility for their own learning by giving them tasks such as developing policy papers for government officials, working collaboratively on a wiki, or undertaking role play exercises. Some of my most exciting teaching experiences over the years have been leading student field classes abroad – 3 years in Normandy (France), 12 years in Paris, and 13 years in Berlin. To my way of thinking the best teachers are not those who provide cut and dried answers to questions, but those who excite students to find out for themselves and who set out clear structures and guidance to enable this to happen.

Dr Simon Willerton

S Willerton

Mathematics and Statistics

s.willerton@sheffield.ac.uk

My role as a lecturer is to inspire and equip the students to go and work things out for themselves. I use whatever tools are available to me to try to acheive that. From getting the students to use all five senses in face-to-face pure maths lectures to combining video technology with the tried and tested medium of blackboards. The aim is always to get the students to the point where they say "Wow! I'd like to figure that out myself."

Mr Daniel Wilson

Daniel WilsonPsychology

mba03daw@sheffield.ac.uk

As a postgraduate tutor at the Mathematics and Statistics Help centre (MASH), I provide one-to-one tuition and workshops to students needing help with learning statistics, or applying it to their research projects. It is a privilege to teach such a variety of students from a very wide range of educational and cultural backgrounds. I see that many students find statistics to be the least enjoyable and most difficult part of their degree course: this should not be the case, as statistics is a very fun subject and a highly transferable skill!

By applying cutting-edge neuroscience research to educational contexts, we have been able to address a relatively unseen aspect of students’ educational background: a specific anxiety known as ‘maths anxiety’. This brain-based condition severely affects a student’s own ‘rules of engagement’, and disproportionately causes at-risk students to avoid learning situations that involve mathematics altogether.

Through a collaboration between neuroscience, MASH, the SpLD service, and the DLL, we were able to address this anxiety with positive effects on examination results. I am enthusiastically interested in further collaborative work in applying neuroscience methods to make statistics the engaging experience it should be for all students!

Professor Mark Winter

Dr Mark Winter

Chemistry

m.winter@sheffield.ac.uk

I am known for my work using the WWW to develop educational chemical resources including WebElements, the first periodic table on the web (1993). I continue to work on new web resources focussing upon innovative chemical databases and chemistry data visualisation. I encourage students to produce their own WWW project sites. I used conventional routes to publish three textbooks and now intend to research the development of interactive chemical books.

Dr Gary Wood

Mr Gary Wood

English Literature, Language and Linguistics

g.c.wood@sheffield.ac.uk

I derive immense satisfaction from seeing my students succeed, and through my university teaching and outreach activity, I aim to inspire and motivate students to be and do the very best that they can – before, during and after their degree programmes. Through the creative use of a research-led approach, recasting difficulty as a manageable challenge, and by exploring alternative methods of teaching and assessment, I strive to empower students to take charge of their own learning and give them the freedom to think and discover things for themselves.

Dr Mohammad Zandi

Mohammad Zandi photo

Chemical and Biological Engineering

m.zandi@sheffield.ac.uk

I believe that learning is not created in the lecture by the teacher but rather learning is created in the mind of the learner. Students cannot learn if their mind in not ready or open no matter what a teacher does in lecture, class or in laboratory. I am interested in enhancing students learning experience through active learning and open-end problem solving. However, teaching large cohorts (+200) are challenging and I am interested in applying my teaching philosophy by adopting technology to increase productivity and improve quality to train practical chemical engineering graduates for 21st century.