BA Business Management

Understanding the principles of how businesses operate and succeed is key to our established Business Management programme, which offers a broad scope of knowledge with the flexibility to specialise later in the course.

Combining rigorous academic study with practical social and operational skills, our BA Business Management will give you a comprehensive understanding of core business issues.

At a glance

  • UCAS code: N200
  • Entry requirements: A-Level ABB plus Maths GCSE B
  • Three year course
  • Optional placement year
  • Flexible programme that allows you to specialise in a particular business function through module choice

Overview

Seminar Business Management

In the first year you’ll study Introduction to Behaviour at Work, Management Themes and Perspectives, Business in Context and Business Economics, as well as skills-based modules covering essential accounting and maths techniques.

Building on the core knowledge base founded in year one, students are encouraged to start thinking about employability and careers at an early stage.

In years two and three, students tailor their degree based on future career plans. From Law for Management and Issues in Corporate Governance to International Marketing and Critical Perspectives in Work and Organisational Psychology, modules vary from the creative to the technical but are all relevant to the modern workplace and taught by leaders in their fields.

Many of the modules are taught using case-studies, so you benefit from the subject matter being put in a real-world context. We also utilise our excellent relationships with businesses and alumni, fostered by a dedicated External Relations team, so BA Business Management students regularly have the opportunity to learn from and network with professionals in a range of sectors. Our module in Operations and Supply Chain Management is run in association with Rolls-Royce. This module’s relationship with industry sees students enjoying lectures from Rolls-Royce speakers, supported by tutorials and seminars held at the school. An integrated case-study and business/simulation game sponsored by Rolls-Royce is also used as the basis for a group project, with a prize awarded by the company’s executives to our best group.

Modules

Level one

Core
Module title Credit value Module description Assessment method
Business Economics 10 This module offers an insight into how microeconomic factors, such as consumer behaviour, can be used to understand and predict business decisions. Macroeconomic issues are also considered, such as inflation and price levels, and the impact this may have on businesses. This is a basic level economics course aimed to give students foundational knowledge. Exam
Introduction to Behaviour at Work 10 This module provides insight into the study of human behaviour in work organisations, developing understanding of why people do the things that they do in organisations. Exam
Accounting and Finance for Managers 20 The aim of this module is to provide an understanding of the basic concepts in accounting and finance. Students are introduced to the preparation and structure of financial statements, the appropriate forms of finance and the means of raising money to fund new or existing enterprises. Also creative accounting is considered and corporate accounting scandals are explored. Exam plus online quizzes
Business Management in Context 20 This module covers a range of issues relevant to the modules covered in a Management Studies degree. The module explores how management came to be as a discipline and how it has evolved, both historically and culturally. It will be the start of building the foundation for studying for a degree programme. 4 assessments (2 per semester), 3 of which are individual assignments and 1 group assignment
Management Themes and Perspectives 20 This module introduces students to some of the key themes and perspectives within management. Through a series of 4 four-week ‘packages’ the module will introduce students to key issues within marketing, sustainable development, operations management and strategic management, with the opportunity to develop assignments based around companies and case studies of their choice. 3 assignments, Integrative group task
Analysis for Decision Making (A or B) 20 This module will demonstrate how quantitative techniques can be used to support effective business decision making. Students will be introduced to a range of quantitative techniques and tools which can be used to produce useful management information within a business context. The module is split into two options, A and B, to provide those who have not previously studied A-level Mathematics increased contact hours. Exams, group project, online quizzes
Futures First: Professional Self-Management 10 This module provides students with a structured and supported process to reflect upon their own learning, performance and achievement, and to plan for their personal, educational and career development. This includes informative talks from graduate recruiters and alumni to give students an insight into the opportunities to expect after graduation and how to make themselves the most employable. Critical review, Reflection, CV and personal action plan

Optional
Module title Credit value Module description Assessment method
Business Challenges 10 The module offers students the opportunity to work in autonomous groups to undertake one of a number of different business ‘challenges’. These challenges involve students working on a range of practical business activities in which the outcomes involve not just a piece of assessed work but also, for some challenges, extra-curricular engagement and impact with external bodies. The nature of the challenges will vary over time to reflect the ongoing engagements with business and the local community. Group presentation, team performance and personal reflection
Unrestricted module 10

An unrestricted module is a module from the same department or another department at the University that is available to all students, subject to availability and numbers. The modules may have other restrictions, such as requiring certain subjects at 'A' level or equivalent. For more information click here.

Varies

Level two

Core
Module title Credit value Module description Assessment method
Organisation Behaviour 20 Organisational Behaviour is concerned with understanding the effects of how workers think, act, and interact with each other. This involves considering a wide range of issues such as power, culture, gender and stress, also taking into account external social, economic, and cultural environments/contexts. This module will also relate students to issues of contemporary relevance, such as the growing importance of management by culture, and the move towards flexible working practices. Essay
Business Strategy 20 The module aims to equip students with the core concepts, frameworks of business strategy, and the practical steps that managers need to take to make the organisation achieve superior performance and sustainable competitive advantage. It aims to enhance students understanding of the theories and practice of strategy. Students will be able to learn why, and how, companies make strategic decisions in the context of today's complex and dynamic world of business. Presentation and exam
Essentials of Marketing 20 Marketing is one of the most important functions of any organisation. This module aims to introduce students to the core principles and practices of the different marketing strategies including buyer behaviour, segmentation, targeting and positioning and the marketing mix for products and services. Group film and individual case study
Principles of Operations Management 20 Operations Management (OM) deals with the production of goods and services and relates closely to other business functions. Operations Management is concerned with the effective and efficient marshalling of the organisation’s resources to meet its objectives. OM is the business function that generates income and is therefore central to all commercial businesses. Operational Research (OR) is introduced on this module to support OM decision-making processes. OR is a systematic and logical approach involving the construction and manipulation of mathematical models. Exam
Optional (choose two)
Module title Credit value Module description Assessment
Law for Management 20 This module provides a basic introduction to the core aspects of English law, with particular emphasis placed on areas of law directly significant to the business professional. The module reviews the essential structures of the English legal system and sources of law necessary to facilitate an understanding of the key substantive areas identified as of primary significance to the business professional. The module subsequently explores different aspects of the substantive areas of contract, tort and company law. Exam, coursework
Business Intelligence 20 Organisations are increasingly viewing business intelligence as a strategic weapon to improve their competitiveness in 21st Century corporate environments. This module uses case studies to illustrate the importance of business intelligence for organisations and to use data to aid decision making. Project report and presentation, exam
Business Statistics 20 This module is concerned with the collection and analysis of data using statistical methods to support research studies and inform management decision making. It is taught at an intermediate level since a basic knowledge of statistics is assumed. It is an applied unit, and, although a high level of mathematical knowledge is not needed, students taking the unit must be numerate and capable of logical thinking. Exam
Human Resource Management 20 This module is concerned with the way organisations manage and organise their employees. It covers both strategic and operational issues. The most important Human Resource Management (HRM) functions and practices are examined. The module encourages students to consider the different contexts in which HRM occurs and to consider the consequences of social, economic and political developments and institutions for HRM. Students are introduced to contemporary debates and are encouraged to take a critical analytical stance in relation to HR practices and outcomes. Exam
Issues in Corporate Governance 20 This module is designed to provide you with an in-depth understanding of the key theoretical and practical issues underpinning the study of
corporate governance, and how they affect the governance of modern corporations.
Group coursework, exam
Enterprise & Entrepreneurship 20 In this module we shall consider how and why the ‘enterprise culture’ has become such a popular phrase for individuals, organisations, communities and governments alike. This is done by examining the various historical, economic, political and social assumptions about the nature of enterprise and entrepreneurship. In addition, the module will examine many individual and organisational stories (from emerging, growing and mature businesses) in order to assess the factors and challenges involved in starting and running your own business. In this module, students will also have the opportunity to evaluate their personal orientations to entrepreneurship and sharpen their appreciation of what it is like being self employed, working in the family business, being an owner-manager, being a corporate entrepreneur or running a franchise business. Elevator pitch, essay
Research Methods 20 An understanding of research methods is critical to appreciate how knowledge is produced, the assumptions underpinning this process and the inevitable limitations. Research design is based on competing assumptions about the nature of knowledge, and will be conducted with varying degrees of technical expertise. An understanding of the process of knowledge production will enable students to critically evaluate research results – whether other people’s or their own. Exam, literature review
Career Management Theory and Practice 20 This module introduces students to the theory and practice of career management, both of one’s own career and as future managers and employers. As well as exploring theories of career participants, the module will consider practical aspects of careers, for example transitioning into work; recruitment and selection process; marketing oneself and finding appropriate jobs. Coursework, mock assessment centre participation
Managing Organisational Change and Learning 20 This module is designed to prepare students for the world of international management in rapidly changing competitive business environments. The central premise of the unit is that all individuals can learn to better adapt to the world around them; as individuals, as members of teams, and as frontline, middle and senior managers. Drawing on a wide range of current research and using a range of assessment methods (including case analyses, group role play and individual critical studies), the module seeks to develop key skills of adaptation suited for the international workplace in the 21st century. Exam, Group Project
Unrestricted module 20 An unrestricted module is a module from the same department or another department at the University that is available to all students, subject to availability and numbers. The modules may have other restrictions, such as requiring certain subjects at 'A' level or equivalent. Varies

 Level three

Core
Module title Credit value Module description Assessment
Corporate Social Responsibility 20 This module seeks to provide an initial introduction to the key issues and themes that are emerging within the CSR field. It examines the pressures encouraging companies to adopt more ethical business strategies, the types of practices and strategies which different companies have sought to adopt in this field, and the potential advantages that are identified for a socially responsible business. It also aims to engage students into thinking whether CSR is effective at solving some of the biggest issues in society and whether it’s the responsibility of the business. Exam, peerwise engagement exercise

Optional (choose five)
Module title Credit value Module description Assessment
Industrial Relations 20 Industrial Relations is fundamentally concerned with understanding the nature of the employment relationship and the contextual environment within which it operates. An understanding of Industrial Relations recognises distinct interests within the workplace and explores how these differing interests are mobilised and regulated. Exam
Integrated Marketing Communications 20 This module is concerned with the concepts and uses of advertising and promotion in an integrated marketing communications (IMC) context. The successful commercialisation of both new and already existing products and services depends on how well the company will communicate any messages to its target market, to trigger desired attitudes and behaviours through advertising, public relations, sponsorship, direct marketing, product placement and any other promotional tool. Other issues covered will include e-IMC, international marketing communications, and ethics. Exam and group coursework
The Leisure Industry 20 This module gives an overview of the leisure industry with an emphasis on sport. It focuses in depth on five issues: the economics of professional team sport; the role of the public sector in providing sport opportunities; the role of volunteers in sport; legacies of mega-sports events, including the Olympic Games; and the nature of leisure in future society. Exam
Language and Organisations 20 This module aims, first, to develop an in-depth understanding of communication processes in organisations and an awareness of why these often prove problematic. More broadly, the aim is to develop students ability to learn and manage their own learning, and to encourage effective time management and personal resources planning. Essay, group presentation
International Business 20 This module introduces key theories of international business development – those concerning the rationales for international expansion, the choice of foreign market entry strategy and the impact on the economies of host
Countries. This theoretical understanding will then be illustrated and examined by reference to the way particular companies in contrasting industries have developed and implemented their international strategies.
Exam, assignment
International Marketing 20 This module will provide students with an understanding of international marketing. The module will prepare students for the challenge of global marketing and the things companies must consider when internationalising. This includes market entry strategies, consumer differences and branding decisions. Video presentation, case study report
Strategy Practice 20 The objective of this module is to increase your strategic thinking abilities by exposing you to a wide range of theories and varying perspectives on the subject discipline. You will be challenged to tackle the modules from a holistic viewpoint, taking in various aspects covered from operational tactical level to high level strategic decisions in order to formulate appropriate courses of action. Coursework
Consumer Psychology 20 This module provides a comprehensive understanding of the psychological processes driving consumers’ decisions related to various products/services, and their consumption behaviour. This will be achieved using the lenses of various psychology and marketing theories. The module also offers an understanding of how consumer psychology influences various marketing decisions at the organisational level (e.g. in terms of marketing communications, new product development, and business strategy). Group project, exam
Management Project 20 This module offers the opportunity for final year students on the Business Management programme to formulate and undertake an independent, structured investigation using desk-based research methods on an authentic business/management problem. It also provides a research experience in the form of a piece of business consultancy, enhancing students’ research and presentation skills, while being supported by an academic mentor and a group of peers working on related projects. Project proposal, final project report, presentation
Work-related Health & Well-Being 20 This module is designed to introduce students to a broad range of topics relevant to good understanding of employee health and well-being issues in the workplace of today. The module aims to provide students with: i) knowledge of theories and models relevant to employee well-being in the contemporary workplaces, ii) ability to effectively understand and manage their own well-being, and that of other employees in relation to their current and future occupations, iii) knowledge of effective practical interventions to limit the negative impact of work on employee health and well-being. Group presentation, exam
Work and Employment in the Twenty-first Century 20 This module is concerned with exploring the dimensions of work and employment in the twenty-first century. It will explore as its central motif ‘decent work’ and ‘job quality’ within the contemporary political economy. We will examine the dimensions of job quality, focusing on issues relating to skill formation, employee autonomy and growing work pressures. Exam, individual essay
Creativity and Innovation 20 This module aims to develop both a theoretical critical understanding of creativity and innovation in organisations and to teach students the practical skills to enhance them. We will take a multi-level perspective by discussing topics such as: the biological, personality and motivational bases of individual creativity; creativity training; influences on team and organisational innovation; and social and cultural dimensions of innovation. A key practical feature of the module is that it will also train students in how to use the research-based CLEAR IDEAS (CI) model to develop innovative solutions to real-life problems. Presentation, exam
Digital Marketing 20 This unit aims to provide a comprehensive and critical understanding of the Internet as a platform to support marketing activities (e.g. digital marketing communications, social media marketing), create meaningful customer relationships (e.g. customer relationship management, online consumption communities) and as a tool to assist with strategic issues (e.g. marketing analytics, online service quality, online retailing and online branding). Group presentation, individual assignment
Socially-Responsible Marketing and Consumption 20 The module provides students with a comprehensive understanding of socially responsible marketing and consumer behaviour and will demonstrate how marketing and consumer behaviour principles can be used to tackle social issues (such as smoking, unhealthy eating, etc), support non-profit organisations, aid sustainability, support government policy development and benefit consumer welfare. Coursework, group project poster
Operations and Supply Chain Management with application to Rolls Royce 20 The aim of this module is to take a higher level view of Operations Management in all sectors of business (Service, Retail, Manufacturing, Public Sector, Tourism etc.) and link these to the strategic objectives of an organisation and provide an insight into Operations Management at a large organisation, with specific focus on Rolls Royce Ltd. While Operations Management is a central business function in all businesses Supply Chain Management expands the role of Operations Management into understanding how purchasing and supply can be managed. specifically to Rolls Royce Ltd. Exam, coursework
Work and Employment in the Twenty-First Century 20 This module is concerned with exploring the dimensions of work and employment in the twenty-first century. It will explore as its central motif notions of `decent work and `job quality within the contemporary political economy. We will examine the key dimensions of job quality focusing on issues relating to skill formation, employee autonomy and growing work pressures.The module will draw on a wide body of both empirical research as well as requiring a theoretical engagement with the subject. Exam, coursework
New Venture Creation 20 This module will provide students with the opportunity to bridge knowledge gained through their studies to develop an idea for a new venture. Students will develop their business ideas through marketing strategy, secondary market research, product design, operations planning, and financial forecasting. Presentation, Coursework
Decision Sciences and Optimisation 20 The module will provide an extensive overview on methodologies for supporting decision making within complex systems, with an emphasis on industry and business management. Real-world success cases arising in manufacturing, healthcare, logistics and service management will be analysed. Formal Exam, Course Work
Managing Complex Projects 20 Megaprojects are transformative for economies and can impact millions of people. Although some of the basic principles of project management may still apply, large-scale complex projects involve different managerial challenges that are related to their size, significance and uncertainty. The aim of this module is to provide students with the fundamental aspects of managing complex projects. Course Work, Group Coursework
Unrestriced Module 20 An unrestricted module is a module from the same department or another department at the University that is available to all students, subject to availability and numbers. The modules may have other restrictions, such as requiring certain subjects at 'A' level or equivalent. Varies

Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research; funding changes; professional accreditation requirements; student or employer feedback; outcomes of reviews; and variations in staff or student numbers. Assessment methods may change - current students can find up-to-date information on MOLE. In the event of any change we'll consult and inform students in good time and take reasonable steps to minimise disruption. Please note that not all combinations of optional modules may be possible because of timetabling.

Placement year

 A placement year is an excellent opportunity to apply what you’ve learnt in your course so far and gain invaluable workplace experience. You’ll develop a range of transferable skills and become more commercially aware. You’ll find out what the world of work is really like and you’ll be paid a salary – on average £13,000-£20,000. Some big corporates are starting to see it as an extended selection process for their graduate training schemes.

It isn’t something you apply for before you get here and they aren’t guaranteed – it’s your responsibility to secure one but we’ll do everything we can to help. Placements take place between your second and final year of study and are usually based in the UK.

Find out more

Student insight
Livia

Student Insight: Livia Burridge

Why did you choose Sheffield University Management School and your course? One of the reasons I chose Sheffield University Management School was because it was rated so highly in the league tables and I knew a degree would be well received by future employers. I chose to study Business Management as beneath the exterior of the millions of businesses that surround us lay unique stories of growth, adaptation and sometimes failure. It is this constant change and development which I find most fascinating.

What have you most enjoyed about your course so far? I have enjoyed the flexibility and the variety of the modules on offer, allowing me to tailor the course to my interests. The course also offers opportunities to complete assignments in groups which allows you to work alongside interesting people, from various cultures. Lecturers often invite guest speakers along, which is really interesting and helps further your understanding of the topics taught in class.

How does University level teaching differ to how you were taught at secondary school and what are the benefits of this? University level teaching has less direct teaching hours meaning there is a lot of self study. This allows you to manage your own time and gives you the spare time to get involved in additional activities such as sports and societies.

What do you like most about the city and why? Sheffield is quite central so makes it easily accessible to visit home and to also visit friend’s universities. Sheffield is not a campus university so you get to see a lot of the city. I always feel safe on a night out in Sheffield; where as some of my friends who have gone to university in larger cities like Manchester don’t always feel safe on a night out.

What are your plans after graduation? How has your course and support from the Management School helped increase your employability? After graduation, I hope to get a place on a retail management graduate scheme. The careers service has being extremely helpful in helping me look for a summer placement, they help you put together your CV and have a great website which advertises all placement and internship vacancies. The management school are also great at enhancing your employability by making you aware of opportunities outside of your study. Recently I took part in Business Challenges, a competition sponsored by IBM that involved running a business through an online simulation. This competition helped me develop many skills that will be desirable to employers; the competition will also look great on my CV.


Hannah M

Student Insight - Placement Year: Hannah McLennaghan

Why did you choose to undertake a placement?
I decided quite late in comparison to other students that I wanted to do a placement year. I wanted to ensure that I would have the right skills and attributes to get into the top graduate schemes so I looked into options which would boost my employability. I had previously done a summer office job at a relatively small and dynamic company after my first year which I absolutely loved. I wanted to progress on the skills that I had learnt during this time and really put my degree into context. I wanted to understand how a large business operates and also find my niche! At the time I had no idea what kind of business area I wanted to go into so I thought a placement year would give me a great insight into where my skills lie and to find my passion.

Did you receive any help/support from the Management School when applying?
As I applied quite late for my placement, I had a lot of catching up to do! I received loads of support from the management school which was incredible. First of all, I had a meeting with the employability hub to explain the process of how to start applying for placements. I then had a few meetings with the careers advisers to get my CV up to date and looking perfect! I tried to use as much support as I could as the whole process is quite daunting, however deciding to do one in the first place was the hardest part and once that was over it was all quite exciting! I also found my placement on career connect which is the University of Sheffield’s internal job site.

What was your role when on your internship?
Company: Virgin Media
Scheme: Virgin Media Business
Job Title: Commercial Analyst
Division: Commercial Deals
I was responsible for delivering profitable growth for the SoHo/SME and Business Partners Channel by supporting its strategic development. This involved creating and building successful business cases that support bespoke customer recruitments by ensuring that the commercial offer is competitive within the market, including acquiring new business, retention and optimising in life contracts.

Do you have any advice for students thinking about doing a placement?
My main advice is to not be scared and to just go for it! The placement process is so much easier than that of the graduate recruitment process as there are much lower levels of applications and they expect less from you. Get yourself a bit of work experience so you can showcase some core competencies with real examples. Show you are passionate about the company and do your research! Also do not get down if you get rejected! It’s all about fitting with the organisation and if you didn’t get it then it might not have been right for you! Don’t give up and use all of the support available to you from the management school as they are extremely helpful. The benefits of doing a placement are endless and it’s the best possible thing you could do for your degree and job prospects.

Do you have any advice for students thinking about doing a placement?
My main advice is to not be scared and to just go for it! The placement process is so much easier than that of the graduate recruitment process as there are much lower levels of applications and they expect less from you. Get yourself a bit of work experience so you can showcase some core competencies with real examples. Show you are passionate about the company and do your research! Also do not get down if you get rejected! It’s all about fitting with the organisation and if you didn’t get it then it might not have been right for you! Don’t give up and use all of the support available to you from the management school as they are extremely helpful. The benefits of doing a placement are endless and it’s the best possible thing you could do for your degree and job prospects.

Read more from our students on our blog

Careers and employability

Your development is our highest priority. Right from the start, we’ll encourage you to think about your career. We’ll listen to you and provide you with all the support you need to achieve your goals. As one of our students, you get a full package of support from the school’s dedicated Employability Hub. This includes one-to-one advice, skills training and special events connecting you to businesses. You’re supported throughout your course and for up to three years after you graduate.

95% of our graduates were in work or further study within six months of graduating

We’ll help you to find part-time jobs, internships and year-long placements. We’ll do everything we can to help you find opportunities that fit with your career plans and meet your development needs. Our External Relations team builds relationships with alumni and businesses so you get lots of opportunities to meet professionals and learn from them. We can also teach you how to develop networks of your own, how to make face-to-face meetings count and how to use social media effectively.

Graduates are highly numerate, articulate and analytical, making them attractive to a wide range of employers. 95% of our graduates were in work or further study within six months of graduating, earning an average starting salary of £20,000. Recent graduates have gone to work for companies such as Deloitte, Deutsche Bank, Ernst & Young, KPMG and PwC, in roles such as Chartered Accountant, Graduate Financial Analyst, Corporate Tax Associate, Senior Financial Support Officer, and Assistant Stock Analyst.

Entry Requirements
Qualification Grades
A-Levels ABB
International Baccalaureate 33
BTEC DDD in relevant subject
Cambridge Pre-U D3 M2 M2
Scottish Highers AAABB
Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma/Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate B+AB

Other requirements

Acceptable subjects

At Sheffield University Management School we feel it is important that the A-Levels you study prepare you for studying on the BA Business Management. We require that students have at least one A-Level from the Universities ‘Acceptable A-Levels’ subject list when combing with subjects which are primarily applied or practical learning based. More information here.

English language requirements

For overseas students we require an overall IELTS score of 6.5 with a minimum of 6.0 in Reading, 6.0 in Writing, 6.0 in Listening and 5.5 in speaking, or an equivalent English language qualification.