NoStraDAMUS - Associated PhD Research

A number of PhD research projects are making a valuable contribution to the NoStraDAMUS project. Details of these can be found below.

Research Projects

The development of brazing filler metals for innovative applications

Researcher: Matt Way
Industrial Sponsor: Johnson Matthey
Description: My PhD focuses on the development of brazing filler metals for innovative applications such as the joining of thermoelectrics and is sponsored by Johnson Matthey. A brazing filler metal is a sort of high temperature metal glue which when heated above its melting point will become molten, flow between two pieces of material and then when allowed to solidify, will join them together (similar to soldering). Thermoelectric devices can convert heat into electricity and as such hold promise for improving the fuel efficiency of cars by recycling waste heat from exhaust gases into electricity which can be used within the car. My PhD focuses on the development of brazing filler metals for innovative applications such as the joining of thermoelectrics and is sponsored by Johnson Matthey.

Development of brazing filler metals High magnification of brazing alloy/parent interface

Corrosion behaviour and mechanical properties of high entropy alloys

Researcher: Piyanut Muangtong
Description: Ms Piyanut Muangtong is exploring the corrosion behaviour and mechanical properties of high entropy alloys in CoCrFeNi-X system for an operation in corrosive environments.

Development of novel nickel-based brazing alloys

Researcher: Liam Hardwick (co-supervisor Ed Pickering, Manchester University)
Industrial Sponsor: VBC Group
Description: My project, supported by VBC Group, is focused on the development of novel nickel-based brazing alloys, primarily for the joining of nickel-based superalloys. Current nickel-based brazing alloys often contain boron, silicon or phosphorus in order to achieve a desirable melting point. However, these elements can lead to the formation of brittle phases in the joint, potentially compromising the mechanical performance. This project is looking at potential replacement elements to avoid such phases, and novel compositions using concepts such as High Entropy Alloys, a class of alloys containing roughly equiatomic amounts of 5 or more elements.

Microstructure of a high entropy alloy Microstructure of a high entropy alloy

Design of lightweight high-stiffness alloys

Researcher: Paul Stavroulakis (cosupervisor Colin Freeman)
Industrial Sponsor: VW Group
Description: High Entropy Alloys (HEA) are multicomponent alloys which typically consist of at least four or five principal alloying elements; allowing for extensive tailor-made alloy design for a wide range of applications. My project looks to utilise the property flexibility of HEAs towards the design of lightweight high-stiffness alloys through first-principles simulations, for application within the automotive sector.

Novel High Entropy Alloys for high temperature nuclear fusion reactor structural components

Researcher: Dhinisa Patel (second supervisor with Amy Gandy)
Industrial Sponsor: Culham Centre for Fusion Energy
Description: The focus of this research is to design and fabricate novel High Entropy Alloys (HEAs) for high temperature structural components for the first wall of a nuclear fusion reactor. A relatively new class of alloys, HEAs comprise several elements (often 5 or more) in similar amounts, as opposed to conventional alloys which are based around one or two principal metals. This can lead to a number of interesting and attractive material properties, including high strength and temperature stability. The aims of this work is to investigate their response to radiation damage and to determine their thermal stability and hence their suitability as candidate materials.

Plasma melting inside Arcast arc melter Plasma melting inside Arcast arc melter

 

Fabricating porous copper for heatsink applications

Researcher: Shaiful Ismail
Description: My research is about fabricating porous copper for heatsink applications. The manufacturing process is metal injection combined with a “space holder” to create the pore structure. Copper powder is blended together with potassium chloride (KCl) and the mixture is injected into a mould to form a specific shape (normally a cylinder in this work). The KCl powder is then removed by dissolving in water before sintering the samples in order to strengthen the structure. The pores reproduce the shape and size of the KCl particles used.

Micrograph of porous copper Micrograph of porous copper