Dr Luca Modenese

MEng, PhD

Luca ModeneseResearch Associate

Department of Mechanical Engineering

INSIGNEO Institute for in silico Medicine

Pam Liversidge Building

Mappin Street

S1 3JD

Email: l.modenese@sheffield.ac.uk


Profile

Dr Luca Modenese gained a MEng degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Padua (Italy) in 2008. After that he started a PhD at Imperial College London (United Kingdom) in the Structural Biomechanics Group and completed it in 2013. His doctoral research focused on the development of numerical models for the estimation of joint contact forces occurring during daily living activities of healthy and pathological subjects. His main research interests are the generation of personalized musculoskeletal models from medical images and the development of computational tools that could be used in clinical environment. From 2013 to 2015 Luca was a postdoctoral fellow in the Centre for Musculoskeletal Research of Griffith University, Queensland, Australia. In 2013 he visited the neuromuscular Biomechanics Laboratory, Stanford, USA, led by Prof. S. Delp for a visiting scholar appointment and in 2015 the Rehabilitation Engineering Group (University of Padua) led by Dr. M. Reggiani. In 2014 he was included by the National Center for Simulation in Rehabilitation Research (NCSRR) between the inaugural 20 members of the OpenSim Fellows program, which recognizes a deep expertise in biomechanical modelling and simulation. In 2015 he was awarded a New Research Grant from Griffith University to develop subject specific models of children with cerebral palsy. Luca is now a postdoctoral researcher at the INSIGNEO Institute for in silico Medicine based at the University of Sheffield, working in the European Project MD-PAEDIGREE.

Research Interests

  • Biomechanics
  • Gait Analysis
  • Musculoskeletal modelling
  • Motor Control
  • Patient specific modelling
  • Joint contact forces prediction

Journal articles

Conference proceedings papers

  • Saxby DJ, Bryant AL, Modenese L, Gerus P, Killen B, Konrath J, Fortin K, Wrigley TV, Bennell KL, Cicuttini FM, Vertullo C, Feller JA, Whitehead T, Gallie P & Lloyd DG (2016) TIBIOFEMORAL CONTACT FORCES 2-3 YEARS FOLLOWING ANTERIOR CRUCUATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION: A COMPARISON WITH HEALTHY INDIVIDUALS. OSTEOARTHRITIS AND CARTILAGE, Vol. 24 (pp S92-S93)
  • Saxby DJ, Wang X, Bryant AL, Modenese L, Gerus P, Konrath J, Fortin K, Wrigley TV, Bennell KL, Cicuttini FM, Vertullo C, Feller JA, Whitehead T, Gallie P & Lloyd DG (2016) TIBIOFEMORAL CONTACT FORCES PROTECT AGAINST ARTICULAR TISSUE DAMAGE IN THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTED KNEE, BUT NOT IF THERE IS CONCURENT MENISCAL INJURY. OSTEOARTHRITIS AND CARTILAGE, Vol. 24 (pp S94-S94)
  • Saxby DJ, Wang X, Bryant AL, Modenese L, Gerus P, Konrath J, Fortin K, Wrigley TV, Bennell KL, Cicuttini FM, Vertullo C, Feller JA, Whitehead T, Gallie P & Lloyd DG (2016) DIFFERENT RELATIONSHIPS EXIST BETWEEN TIBIOFEMORAL CONTACT FORCES AND ARTICULAR TISSUE MORPHOLOGY IN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTED AND HEALTHY KNEES. OSTEOARTHRITIS AND CARTILAGE, Vol. 24 (pp S373-S374)
  • Modenese L, Phillips ATM & Bull AMJ (2010) A state of the art 3D model of the lower limb: Application to muscle force estimation and validation. IFMBE Proceedings, Vol. 31 IFMBE (pp 981-984)

Datasets