Intercalated BSc Medical Sciences (Surgery) research projects

Research projects available for our intercalated BSc Medical Sciences (Surgery) can be found below.

Off
Systematic review and service evaluation of transanal resection techniques for significant rectal neoplasms

Main Supervisor

Mr Athur Harikrishnan (a.harikrishnan@sheffield.ac.uk)

Second Supervisor

Dr Panagiota Kitsanta (panagiota.kitsanta@nhs.net)

Other Supervisors

Mr Shwan Amin, Dr Rebecca Denoronha

Aim and Objectives

Significant rectal neoplasms include large benign and malignant lesions that require complex surgical techniques to treat. Transanal techniques like TEMS and TAMIS are well recognised treatment options. The aims of this project are

  1. to perform a systematic review of the efficacy and long-term outcomes of transanal resection techniques in the treatment of significant rectal neoplasms published in literature, and
  2. to review the outcomes of transanal techniques in the treatment of significant rectal neoplasms in the colorectal unit of Sheffield Teaching Hospitals

Research Methodology

Stage One: Learn methodology of conducting systematic review.

Stage Two: Conduct systematic review of the efficacy and outcomes of transanal techniques in the treatment of significant rectal neoplasms published in English literature. This will involve detailed literature search on the topic that is followed by data consolidation and analysis. The candidate is expected to write and submit the systematic review for publication to a peer-reviewed journal. This review will form the first part of the dissertation submitted for the BSc intercalated degree.

Stage Three: Learn methodology of conducting data collection and comparative analysis. The candidate will gain knowledge of basic and advanced statistical knowledge required for the project.

Stage Four: The candidate will collect data related to transanal techniques used in the treatment of significant rectal neoplasms in the Sheffield colorectal unit under the guidance of the supervisors. This will involve retrospective and prospective data collection, data analysis, statistical computing and discussion of results. This exercise should generate at least one publication and several abstracts, posters and presentations in regional, national and international meetings. The core data analysis from this stage will contribute to the second part of the dissertation. It is expected that the stages mentioned above will merge to complement each other during the BSc project.

Expected Outcome

  1. The project will generate at least two peer-reviewed publications as mentioned above.
  2. The project will also yield several posters and presentations in regional, national and international meetings.
  3. The project will enable the candidate to submit a dissertation to the university as a requirement for the BSc degree.
  4. The candidate will gain knowledge of key academic assets that is required for any medical practitioner e.g., systematic review and clinical data analysis.

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

  1. The student will learn research and statistical methodology of conducting and writing a systematic review.
  2. The student will be taught clinical and demographic data collection and analyses.
  3. The student will learn about investigation and treatment of rectal neoplasms
Developing and using an app to enhance patient experience and control in head and neck cancer patients?

Main Supervisor

Mr Omar Mulla (omar.mulla1@nhs.net)

Second Supervisor

Mr Mark Watson (mark.watson11@nhs.net)

Other Supervisors

Mr Shwan Amin, Dr Rebecca Denoronha

Aim and Objectives


Background to problem

• The pressure on frontline NHS services is increasing, consequently novel solutions and new ways of working are needed.
• In surgical outpatients we are seeing large numbers of patients who have had treated head and neck cancer attending for regular follow up.
• These patients will often only make contact with a healthcare professional on the allocated appointment time; in some instances this means recurrences are picked up late.
• Phase 1 of this project will be gaining the relevant content - facts, symptoms and details needed that will be used to create spine of any future app for patient self management.

Aims/Objectives

The aim of this study is to investigate patterns of follow up and symptoms post head and cancer to allow patients to take partial control of their symptoms.

Research Methodology

Both quantitative and qualitative methods will be required:

1. Performing a literature review on quality of life measures for head and neck cancer patients.
2. Attending clinics and patient focus groups to ascertain from patients and clinicians what they would like from a patient controlled app.
3. Obtaining clinician dependent information via mass mailing to head and neck surgeons/using head and neck cancer forums for online member surveys.
4. Combining the acquired data to decide content for any future app.
5. Sharing this information with clinicians and patients to obtain feedback.

Expected Outcome

It is expected the first year of intercalation would generate the potential for two clinical papers. The first paper being a systematic review on quality of life measures for head and cancer patients and second paper about patient perceptions and data needed for patients to actively participate in their follow up. This will likely need to be tested in a small cohort of people so may generate a third paper.
These have the potential for presentation at national conferences or publication in peer review journals. If the student’s work is accepted for presentation, then expenses will be available for conferences and travel fees. It is hoped that this work will contribute to the eventual quality improvement in surgical outpatient care.

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

Doncaster and Bassetlaw is ideally suited to supporting intercalating students in their research. The hospital will pay for travel expenses from Sheffield and accommodation can be arranged is needed. Students will receive orientation to the hospital and department, along with mentoring. Specific training will be provided in conducting systematic reviews and training can also be arranged for writing clinical papers. Weekly supervision meetings will be organised to guide the student through each stage of this research project. Further optional clinical experience in the surgical department can be arranged for interested students.

Additional persons involved

Specialist head and neck nurses and ENT surgeons are very keen to work with individuals and invite them to head and neck focus groups to gauge patient compliance and help patients understand the purpose of the study.
The Feasibility of Patient-Directed Prehabilitation in Colorectal Cancer Surgery

Main Supervisor

Mr Tim Wilson (tim.wilson1@nhs.net)

Second Supervisor

Ms George Rina (rina.george@nhs.net)

Aim and Objectives

Prehabilitation seeks to improve patient fitness and recovery following surgery, but these programmes usually require additional personal and resources to implement and oversee.
The aims of this study…
- Are patients able to assess their own functional capacity (ability to recovery from surgery) and modifiable risk factors using a self-report style questionnaire
- Can patients comply with self-directed prehabilitation exercises and can these lead to improved functional capacity and outcomes after surgery

Are patients able to reliably self-assess their prehabilation potential for colorectal surgery?

Research Methodology

A systematic review will be conducted to identify patient-reported measures of functional capacity which are suitable for inclusion on the patient questionnaire.
Following design of the final questionnaire and self-directed prehabilitation exercises, the student will help oversee the implementation of this quality improvement programme. They will collect data and interview patients as part of a service evaluation to determine.

- Compliance with self-report questionnaires
- Usefulness of questionnaires in making perioperative decisions
- Compliance with self-directed prehabilitation exercises
- Effect on length of stay and its correlation with functional capacity and compliance

Expected Outcome

This research is part of a quality improvement project that is expected to improve the care and outcomes of surgical patients, as well as contribute to the body of knowledge around prehabilitation. The outcomes of both the systematic review and the quality improvement aspects of this study could be presented to national conferences and may be suitable for publication if sufficient data was collected.

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

This project would suit any trainee with an interest in surgery or anaesthetics. Doncaster and Bassetlaw is ideally suited to supporting intercalating students in their research. Students will receive orientation to the hospital and department, along with mentoring. Specific training will be provided in conducting the systematic review, in collecting data from the clinical environment and in the writing of clinical papers. Regular supervision meetings will be organised to guide the student through each stage of this research project. As part of the BSc, there are extensive opportunities for clinical experience in the surgical department.
The 10-year mortality of bariatric surgery

Main Supervisor

Mr Abdulzahra Hussain (azahrahussain@yahoo.com)

Second Supervisor

Mr S Yeluri (sashi.yeluri@nhs.net)

Aim and Objectives

1.To assess the long-term safety of bariatric surgery 2. To assess the causes of mortality and to provide a plan for prevention

Overarching hypothesis:
Bariatric surgery safety is crucial .The pillars of this safety are the bariatric MDT, experienced surgical skills, strong infrastructure and equipment and accurate patients selection.
The study will assess whether these parameters had successfully implemented to produce the desired outcome.

The research question: is bariatric surgery safe compared to the national data provided by National Bariatric Surgery Registry NBSR?

Research Methodology

Design: prospective, multi-centre study, population: post bariatric patients. Inclusion criteria: all consecutive patients who had any type of the bariatric operation between 2011 and 2021.Exclusion criteria: less than 18 years old. All bariatric units in the UK will be invited to take part in the study .The data including patients demographic features, comorbidities, ASA grading and date and cause of death. Type of primary and revision operation if it was done.

Expected Outcome

The study will report the mortality reasons according ton the type of surgery and what it could have been done to prevent such mortality

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

The students will be offered training sessions about how to conduct and write research project. They will have opportunity to attend bariatric theatre to understand the surgery details, seeing the patients in post operative period and understand the follow up , short and long term complications.
Why gallbladder surgery become increasingly difficult after Covid-19 pandemic

Main Supervisor

Mr Abdulzahra Hussain (azahrahussain@yahoo.com)

Second Supervisor

Mr Samuel N (nsamuel@nhs.net)

Aim and Objectives

To understand the causes of increasing difficulty of performing laparoscopic cholecystectomy after Covid-19 pandemic.

Research Methodology

Design : comparative study, pro and retrospective data of patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
Population: consecutive series of patients before and after covid. The data will include demographic features, comorbidities, previous surgery, short term complications, intra-operative findings of grade of difficulty. The study will look into retrospective and prospective data of two arms. Running statistical tests and make the conclusions.

Expected Outcome

Difficult gallbladder surgery after Covid-19 is likely to result in more cases of bile leak, injuries, longer hospitalisation and increasing cost.

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

Students will have opportunity to conduct clinical research and will be exposed to methodology in clinical environment. They will have access to the theatre, clinics to see the operative details and follow up programme.
Evaluating patient outcomes in robotic renal surgery

Main Supervisor

Mr Marcus Cumberbatch (m.g.cumberbatch@sheffield.ac.uk)

Second Supervisor

Professor James Catto (j.catto@sheffield.ac.uk)

Third Supervisors

Ibrahim Jubber

Aim and Objectives

Aims:
To review the use of robotics in renal and upper tract urothelial cancer surgery.
To review pain score differences between robotic, laparoscopic and open renal surgery, or part open renal surgery.
To review length of stay and length of catheterisation differences between robotic, laparoscopic and open renal surgery, or part open renal surgery.
To review patient satisfaction differences between robotic, laparoscopic and open renal surgery, or part open renal surgery.

Objectives:
Undertake a systematic review of robotic renal surgery.
Complete an observational, non-randomised study of all renal operations over 6 months.
Capture data on length of stay (LOS) and catheterisation durations using Lorenzo software.
Obtain VAS (visual analogue scores) questionnaire responses from post-operative patients.
Obtain EQ-5D questionnaire responses from post-operative patients.
Analyse data to compare differences in patient reported outcome measures and health costs differences.

Hypothesis/background:
Currently the European Association of Urologists considers robotic surgery to be non-inferior to open or laparoscopic surgery in radical nephrectomy or nephro-ureterectomy.
We hypothesis that oncological outcomes are equal and that pain scores/PREMS (patient reported experience measures)/length of stay/blood loss is less

Question:
Should the robotic approach be the standard of care for renal surgery required for upper tract urothelial cancer and renal cell cancer?

Research Methodology

Systematic literature review
Service evaluation of renal surgery in Sheffield
Delivery of data necessary to influence practice and inform clinical trials.
Data analysis of recruited case series and generation of new prospectively collected database.

Expected Outcome

Published report of the systematic review
Priority ranking of outcomes likely to result in wider uptake of robotic renal approaches
Generate a clear view of the health economics impact of a switch to greater robotic uptake

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

Guidance in literature searching and training In systematic reviews
Help and guidance in report writing and ‘how to publish’
Training in data analysis (excel, prism, SPSS)
Training in trial design and steps needed to implement research into clinical practice
Training in health economics evaluations.
Integration of eWearables into the Surgical pathway

Main Supervisor

Professor Jim Catto (j.catto@sheffield.ac.uk)

Second Supervisor

Professor Allan Lawrie (a.lawrie@sheffield.ac.uk)

Third Supervisor

Marcus Cumberbatch

Aim and Objectives

Research question:
Can the additional of eWearable technology improve the outcomes (fewer complications, faster recovery) from surgery?

Aims:
To review the use of eWearables in the Surgery
To review the use of eWearables in assisting prehabilitation before surgery
To review the use of eWearables in assisting discharge after surgery
Understand the potential for eWearables to improve the patient journey

Objectives:
Undertake a systematic review of eWearables in the Surgery
Develop guidance regarding the use of eWearables in prehabilitation before surgery
Develop guidance regarding the use of eWearables in assisting discharge after surgery
Analyse steps per day datasets over the surgical pathway
 

Research Methodology

Systematic literature review
Identification of outcomes relevant to eWearables
Development of guidance regarding their use
Delivery of data necessary for comparative clinical trials
Data analysis of recruited case series and generation of new data

Expected Outcome

Systematic review of eWearbles in surgery
Published report of the systematic review
Priority ranking of outcomes likely to reflect the implementation of eWearables
Understanding health economic issues of their implementation
Delivery of novel analysis of data exploring wearables and surgery

Type of Project

Qualitative Project/non-lab based - primarily using qualitative methods

Additional Training

Guidance in literature searching and training in systematic reviews
Help and guidance in report writing
Training in data analysis (Excel, Prism)
Training in trial design and steps needed to implement research into clinical practice

Evaluation of the use of 3-D radiographic (EOS scan) spinal reconstruction in CAD/CAM brace design in idiopathic scoliosis

Main Supervisor

Mr Ashley Cole (ashley.cole4@nhs.net)

Second Supervisor

Mr Lee Breakwell (LeeBreakwell@nhs.net)

Aim and Objectives

To evaluate the use of 3-D reconstructions from PA and lateral radiographs to improve CAD/CAM brace design in idiopathic scoliosis.

Research Methodology

The student will perform a scoping review of CAD/CAM designed spinal braces for use in scoliosis. The EOS scanner takes PA and lateral radiographs at the same time and these can be combined to produce a 3-D model. The student will become proficient at this. They will then work with Rodin software under the instruction of our orthotic team to design braces from the PA radiograph as is done currently and then from the 3D reconstruction.

Expected Outcome

It is expected that the 3D designs will be different to the 2D designs and this will allowing for improved correction of the three dimensional scoliosis deformity whilst not increasing the pressure placed on the trunk.

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

Reconstruction of EOS radiographs; Using Rodin4D software to design spinal braces.
An investigation into the predictors of outcome in patients presenting with acute aortic dissection

Main Supervisor

Dr Saima Ehsan (saima.ehsan@nhs.net)

Second Supervisor

Mr Govind Chetty (govind.chetty@nhs.net)

Other Supervisors

Dr Stephen Goode

Aim and Objectives

The overall aim is to investigate the predictors of outcome in patients presenting with acute thoracic aortic dissection
The research component of the project is to look at the associations of various variable or a combination thereof; demographics, pre existing conditions, medication, type of dissection, clinical parameters, biochemical parameters, time of intervention that may exist with good outcomes favourable or otherwise.

Research Methodology

The student will be expected to carry out the following elements of the research project:
1) Literature review on acute aortic syndromes, focussing on thoracic aortic dissections
2) Retrospective data collection using trust resources : Review of all patients presenting to STH with the diagnosis of acute aortic syndrome focussing on the following
Demographic data, Co morbidities, Prescribed medications on admission, Initial clinical/biochemical/radiological assessment, Radiological classification Inpatient clinical journey , Discharge destination and outcomes at six months of FU
3) Student will be supported in data analysis work

Expected Outcome

Clinical Translation: Ability or otherwise, to identify patients presenting with acute aortic syndrome with focus on thoracic aortic dissection, and modify the variable/variables that may have an influence patient outcome.

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

Exposure to open and endovascular cardiac and vascular surgery to provide context to the research project. Initial training in radiological assessment.
Examining the cosmesis of mastectomy scars

Main Supervisor

Ms Jenna Morgan (j.morgan@sheffield.ac.uk)Professor Lynda Wyld (l.wyld@sheffield.ac.uk)

Second Supervisor

Professor Lynda Wyld (l.wyld@sheffield.ac.uk)

Aim and Objectives

To determine what factors provide a visually cosmetically superior simple mastectomy scar.

Research Methodology

Qualitative interview study with up to 25 women who have undergone simple mastectomy to understand their lived experience of their scar and flat chest. Qualitative interview study with surgeons about the techniques they use for achieving a flat surface. Survey using photographs of mastectomy scars in order to understand what makes an aesthetically superior mastectomy scar.

Expected Outcome

To determine what factors contribute to an aesthetically superior simple mastectomy scar. To compare opinions between post-operative patients and breast surgeons. These findings will be written up as a full peer reviewed paper, presented at the UK National breast meeting (the ABS) and also published in abstract form.

Type of Project

Qualitative Project/non-lab based - primarily using qualitative methods

Additional Training

Training in qualitative analysis and the use of NVivo software will be provided. Student will be encouraged to attend breast surgery clinics and theatre lists to learn more about breast surgery.

Long term outcomes of immediate breast reconstruction with implants and acellular dermal matrix. A mixed qualitative and quantitative study

Main Supervisor

Professor Lynda Wyld (l.wyld@sheffield.ac.uk)

Second Supervisor

Ms Jenna Morgan (j.morgan@sheffield.ac.uk)

Aim and Objectives

To determine the long term outcomes of immediate breast reconstruction with implants and acellular dermal matrices in terms of adverse events, quality of life, cosmesis and the need for revision surgery in women who have undergone surgery either for breast cancer or for risk reduction.

Research Methodology

Retrospective observational study of up to 200 consecutive breast reconstructions at Doncaster Royal Infirmary to collate data about adverse events, need for further surgery and rates of implant loss. A qualitative study to interview up to 25 of these women to understand their lived experience of reconstruction. A survey study of up to 100 of these women to determine the impact of the surgery on their quality of life and body image using the BreastQ tool. Data on outcomes will then be compared with those from a similar cohort of women who have had a different type of surgery (an LD flap procedure) to determine which of the 2 types of reconstruction gives the most durable long term outcomes.

Expected Outcome

To determine whether ADM and implant reconstruction gives better or worse long term outcomes than LD flap reconstruction and to establish the rate of complications and impact on quality of life of such major surgery. These findings will be written up as a full peer reviewed paper, presented at the UK National breast meeting (the ABS) and also published in abstract form.

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

Student will be encouraged to attend breast surgery clinics and theatre lists to learn more about breast surgery and reconstruction.
Randomised Control Trial between pinning in situ vs. pinning in situ and arthroscopy of hip to correct deformity in Slipped Upper Femoral Epiphysis (SUFE).

Main Supervisor

Mr Sanjeez Madan (s.madan@sheffield.ac.uk)

Second Supervisor

Miss Caroline Blakey (caroline.blakey1@nhs.net)

Other Supervisors

Mr Nick Green

Aim and Objectives

The goal is to see the outcome of arthroscopy as added intervention to correct deformity in SUFE

Research Methodology

SUFE is a condition of hip between the age of 9 to 14 year old, where the femoral head (epiphysis) slips from the metaphysis of the femur and causes significant deformity in the hip, This has been shown to cause joint cartilage damage in the hip joint and over 10-20 years early onset of osteoarthritis of the hip. Some patients do start getting immediate hip pain after just putting one screw in the hip (pinning in situ). This procedure doesn't correct the deformity but prevents further slipping. The deformity is a bone bump that erodes or scrapes away the joint cartilage over time, which is the cause of pain and eventual osteoarthritis of the hip. We aim to add arthroscopy to correct or minimise the deformity by shaving away the bone that causes joint cartilage damage. As per our past audits we get 20 patients per annum with this condition in hospitals treating this condition. We will do the study at three sites, viz. SCH, Doncaster and Barnsley. This will give us cohort of 60 patients. Barnsley patients will be transferred to SCH for treatment. This is a feasibility study. Pre-operative and post-operative scores will be collected at 3 months, 6 months and a year after the operation. This data will help us to write up a bigger NIHR grant for multi-center national study.

Expected Outcome

This is an exciting area of research and NIHR has already funded about 2.2 million grant on this subject. Outcome measures will include validated iHOT, EQ-5D, PROMIS and UCLA scores. We hope to show that by using arthroscopic osteoplasty (shaving away the protruding bone) in addition to pinning in situ we can reduce pain, improve function and earlier return to sport and other activities of the children. This group will be compared to just pinning in-situ and their scores will be compared and statistically analysed. We hope to have 30 in each group and we will compare the outcome scores for statistical significance using SPSS. The protocol and ethics approval will be in place by April 2021 for the project to start so that the medical student can start collecting and analysing the data as study progresses. The students will be able to attend clinics, scrub in operation theatre and can attend ward rounds and also attend our weekly Friday morning teaching program for Higher surgical trainees and fellows in paediatric orthopaedics.

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

We will train students in qualitative and quantitative research methodology. I am one of the orthopaedic tutors for BSc program and we taught the present batch of BSc students, techniques of metalwork fixation on saw bones, suturing, and arthroscopy skills. In addition we taught them on Clinical surgical repositories (registries), Randomised controlled clinical trials, and funding sources for research grant applications. We will also teach students clinical examination and basic surgical/operative skills.
Nutritional deficiencies after gastric bypass surgery

Main Supervisor

Mr Abdulzahra Hussain (abdulzahra.hussain@nhs.net)

Second Supervisor

Professor Linda Wyld (l.wyld@sheffield.ac.uk)

Aim and Objectives

To compare the Nutritional deficiencies after Mini Gastric Bypass[MGB] and Roux En-Y Gastric Bypass[RYGB]

Research Methodology

Background: both RYGB and MGB are known for nutritional deficiencies, however the magnitude of this complication is not well studied in MGB specifically.The aim is to compare both operations with regards to the nutritional deficiencies.

Methods: All patients who underwent MGB and RYGB during 2015-2017 are included.
The blood tests and clinical notes are reviewed to complete the data set.
The data are including demographic, operative details, complications and nutritional deficiencies in particular.
Statistical analysis will be applied and P value of <0.5 will be taken as significant.
Both procedures nutritional outcomes are compared.

Expected Outcome

Studies had shown MGB is associated with nutritional deficiencies , however we don't know the magnitude compared to RYGB at the same setting units.

We anticipate MGB higher nutritional deficiencies rate but this is yet to be confirmed by the study.

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

The student will enjoy full training and support in clinical environment with regards to the project setting ,data access, and theatre attendance to observe the types of the operations. The main work will be data collection and analysis. The student will be supported by funding the transport between Sheffield and Doncaster.

The Early and Late Costs of Bleeding After Cardiac Surgery

Main Supervisor

Mr Norman Briffa (n.briffa@sheffield.ac.uk)

Second Supervisor

Mr Neill Cartwright

Aim and Objectives

To examine the effects of bleeding after cardiac surgery on early and late mortality, morbidity and hospitals costs.

Research Methodology

Patients undergoing cardiac surgery over the past 20 years in Sheffield will be studied. They will be identified from the cardiac surgery database. They will be divided into 3 groups, 1 group of patients who required re-exploration for bleeding, one group of patients who were not re-explored and whose postop bleeding was in the upper tertile/quartile and a third group of patients who were not re-explored and whose postop bleeding was in the lower tertile/quartile. Differences in characteristics between the 3 groups will be corrected for, using propensity scoring. The following outcomes will then be compared between the 3 matched groups - mortality in the first 30 days, incidence of severe morbid events namely renal failure and number of days requiring higher care (ICNARC intensive care database), cost of care during the index admission (reference NHS costs), the re-admission to hospital after the initial surgery (HES database), and late survival (ONS and NHS Spine).

Expected Outcome

Bleeding after cardiac surgery, whether it requires re-exploration or not results in poor early and long term outcomes and incurs significant extra excess costs to the NHS.

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

Extraction of data from the established databases will be carried out by departmental database managers. Data cleaning and statistical analysis within Excel files will be carried out by the student.
Simulation models in surgical training – systematic review and analysis of current simulation environment for surgical training in South Yorkshire

Main Supervisor

Mr Athur Harikrishnan (a.harikrishnan@sheffield.ac.uk)

Second Supervisor

Mr Paul Skinner (paul.skinner4@nhs.net)

Other Supervisors

Prof S Brown, Mrs L Izzard

Aim and Objectives

Current challenges in surgical training has produced a surge in the different types of simulation techniques to equip the trainees with the most appropriate skills to practice safe medicine. Traditional teaching is supported by a variety of learning environments like dry lab, wet lab, cadaveric lab and software-based laparoscopic and robotic surgery models. More recently virtual reality and augmented reality simulators have entered the realm of surgical training that have introduced a completely new dimension to the surgical learning experience.
The aims of this project are to:

  1. conduct a systematic review of the different simulation frameworks and platforms used in general surgery and colorectal surgery training, and
  2. perform an analysis of the current surgical simulation environment in South Yorkshire.

Research Methodology

Stage One: Learn methodology of conducting systematic review.

Stage Two: Conduct systematic review of the different simulation models used in general and colorectal surgery. This will involve detailed literature search on the topic that is followed by data consolidation and analysis. The candidate is expected to write and submit the systematic review for publication to a peer-reviewed journal. This review will form the first part of the dissertation submitted for the BSc intercalated degree.

Stage Three: Learn methodology of conducting data collection and comparative analysis. The candidate will gain knowledge of basic and advanced statistical knowledge required for the project.

Stage Four: The Sheffield Academy of Surgical Skills and Simulation conducts different courses and workshops encompassing various types of simulation models including dry lab, wet lab, laparoscopic skills lab and cadaveric courses. The candidate will collate and analyse the excepted learning outcomes and skill set development from each type of training episode. This will involve data collection, data analysis, statistical computing and discussion of results. This exercise should generate at least one publication and several abstracts, posters and presentations in regional, national and international meetings. The core data analysis from this stage will contribute to the second part of the dissertation.

It is expected that the stages mentioned above will merge to complement each other during the BSc project.

Expected Outcome

  1. The project will generate at least two peer-reviewed publications as mentioned above.
  2. The project will also yield several posters and presentations in regional, national and international meetings.
  3. The project will enable the candidate to submit a dissertation to the university as a requirement for the BSc degree.
  4. The candidate will gain knowledge of key academic assets that is required for any medical practitioner e.g., systematic review and data analysis.

Type of Project

Qualitative Project/non-lab based - primarily using qualitative methods

Additional Training

  1. The student will learn research and statistical methodology of conducting and writing a systematic review.
  2. The student will be taught clinical and demographic data collection and analyses.
  3. The candidate will understand the different simulation models and platforms used for surgical training and get a first hand knowledge of benchmarking the simulation courses.

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