PG Certificate Medical Education course structure information

The University of Sheffield Medical School building

The course consists of three 20 credit modules. Each module includes two study days.  During the two study days, the core elements of the module will be explored, with examples from practice being used to illustrate key components.  Each participant will be expected to participate in approximately 8 weeks of online activity.

Study dates

2020 study dates

All dates are subject to change

Module

Study Dates

Online Activity

Submission Timeline

Induction Day

Wed 02 Sep 20  (14:00 - 18:00)

   
 

(MDE6001)   Module 1 - Effective Learning & Teaching

Wed 09 Sep 20

Wed 16 Sep 20

Mon 21  Sep 2020
to
Fri 30 Oct 20

Blackboard Opens - Mon 19 Oct 2020 @ 09:00
Submission DL - Fri 30 Oct 2020 @ 17:00
Feedback Released - Mon 23 Nov 2020 @ 17:00 

(MDE61003)   Module 2 - Work Based Learning & Teaching

Tue 05 Jan 21

Tue 12 Jan 21

Mon 18 Jan 21
to
Fri 26 Mar 21

Blackboard Opens - Mon 15 Feb 2021 @ 09:00
Submission DL - Fri 26 Feb 2021 @ 17:00
Feedback Released - Mon 22 Mar 2021@ 17:00

 

(MDE6002)   Module 3 - Programme Design

Thu 29 Apr 21

Thu 06 May 21

Mon 10 May 21
to
Fri 18 Jun 21

Blackboard Opens - Mon 07 Jun 2021 @ 09:00
Submission DL - Fri 18 Jun 2021 @ 17:00
Feedback Released - Mon 12 Jul 2021 @ 17:00

Module 1 (MDE61001) - Effective Learning & Teaching

This module is designed to engage participants in the ways that learning happens and is currently understood. It links these understandings to the way knowledge is created and verified through processes of evaluation and assessment. It also requires participants to adopt a scholarly/theoretically informed approach to planning and delivering teaching and learning activities rather than being driven by situational factors. It will draw on particular models such as constructive alignment and learning taxonomies to ensure that there are sound principles to accompany selected theoretical frameworks.

Module Aims:

MA1 Develop a scholarly approach to planning and delivering teaching and learning activities
MA2 Base teaching practice on sound theoretical principles
MA3 Develop as reflective teaching practitioners

Module Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the module, a student will be able to:

LO1 describe clear learning outcomes with reference to established learning taxonomies and theories
LO2 apply the principle of constructive alignment in order to choose teaching and learning activities appropriate to the desired learning outcomes
LO3 plan and execute teaching and learning practices informed by the principles above
LO4 critically evaluate their peers teaching and learning practices by applying the principles above
LO5 Reflect on their own teaching in the light of their chosen approach

Indicative Content:

The overall delivery of the module will be through a blended approach, combining face-to-face workshops and on-line activities and tasks. Such delivery will be based on broadly constructivist and adult learning principles with knowledge being ‘made’ and shared in the room with some negotiation of the methods used being handed to the learners. The processes will therefore be inherently student-led in terms of scope and pace consistent with engagement with the module learning outcomes.  The face-to-face workshops will be structured around an experiential learning cycle.  Our learners will start with their prior experience(s) of planning and delivering learning activities and will exit the cycle after one full circuit. The module will be structured in such a way as to help them make the most of the journey around the cycle. The module has two whole-day study encounters which are supported by online activity before, between and after.  Before the first study day, students will engage with a handful of texts concerning educational approaches as they connect to planning and delivering teaching sessions.  These will be supported by video.  This will allow a degree of familiarity with some of the language and concepts of teaching and learning ahead of the first study.

Study Day 1

Students will engage in reflective discussions of their experience of planned learning and teaching. Teaching staff will facilitate these discussions in order to draw out key themes relating to LO1 and LO2. We anticipate questions about:  Epistemology – what learning is, and what kinds of learning are there?  Roles – what are the respective contributions of teacher and learner, and are there different kinds of teacher and learner?  Practices – what kinds of teaching and learning activities are there, and how does a teacher select from them appropriately? We will lead from these discussions into specific educational theories and associated practices, specifically:

  • behaviourism, cognitivism, reflective learning, constructivism, andragogy.
  • Learning taxonomies: Biggs SOLO taxonomy, Bloom’s taxonomies.
  • The roles of teachers and learners with regards to different knowledge types and contexts eg Biggs’ three levels, Harden and Rosby 12 roles, Fox’s 4 roles.
  • Practices: learning outcome description, constructive alignment, activation practices. Independent Study: Students will then prepare a microteaching session ahead of the second study day.

Guidance will be given and supported with online material. They will use the concepts and practices they find relevant to their session to do this.

Study Day 2

Students undertake microteaching sessions, in groups of around 6. These sessions will form the basis for peer evaluation and reflection.

Online Study

Following study day 2 students will be supported to reflect on their microteaching sessions through online discussion and also to consider and develop their evaluations of their peers’ teaching sessions.

Module 1 Assessment:

An account of their own taught session including their LOs, chosen approach and intentions, with a reflective commentary. (2,400 words) 60%
Evaluations of peer teaching sessions as a sample of critical application of theory to practice. (1,600 words) 40%

Module 2 (MDE61003) - Work Based Learning & Teaching

This module focuses on teaching and learning activities in the clinical workplace and takes account of the challenges and opportunities inherent in such workspaces - particularly patient safety. The module will explore how clinical workplaces can be developed as sites for learning as well as the delivery of health services including the involvement of real patients receiving real services such as clinical assessments in ambulatory care including Emergency Department, AMU, Pre-operative assessment clinics, handovers, ward-rounds, ward tasks, operating and procedural lists, outpatient clinics and general practice clinics. The module will draw upon relevant theory and concepts such as ‘participation’ and ‘supported participation’ to emphasise how learner agency as well as situational factors shape the learning experience. The module will also highlight how becoming a doctor, dentist or other health professional is a process of identity formation as well as knowledge/skill acquisition/increasing employability.

Module Aims:

MA1 To provide a theoretical framework for the development of informed teacher and learner roles and strategies in clinical environments
MA2 To explore the distinctive features of clinical workplaces and how these are crucial to identity formation as well as knowledge and skill acquisition
MA3 To develop participants as scholarly and reflective practitioners

Module Learning Outcomes:

LO1 Identify learning affordances particular to their own clinical contexts drawing on appropriate taxonomies to include extra-cognitive learning outcomes
LO2 Apply the principle of constructive alignment in order to describe how they could enhance the learning identified above
LO3

Describe how they could make use of readily-available resources to make the learning safe, effective and sustainable in a clinical environment

LO4 Demonstrate theoretically-informed feedback practice and reflect critically on their own Practice

Indicative Content:

The overall delivery of the module will be through a blended approach, combining face-to-face workshops and online activities and tasks. Such delivery will be based on broadly constructivist and adult learning principles with knowledge being ‘made’ and shared in the room with some negotiation of the methods used being handed to the learners. The processes will therefore be inherently student-led in terms of scope and pace consistent with engagement with the module learning outcomes. Since most of the learners on the PG Cert will have some experience of planning and delivering workplace learning, we will structure the module around a simple experiential learning cycle. Our learners will start with their prior experience(s) of workplace learning, will exit the teaching days at the planning stage, and will complete the cycle through the assessment process. The module will be structured in such a way as to help them make the most of the journey around the cycle. These approaches and methods are set out indicatively below:

Study Day 1

Learners will bring a brief account of a recent workplace learning experience – ideally as ‘teacher’ but, if necessary, as ‘learner’. Reflection exercise (LOs 2-4) Learners will be facilitated (part-time) in groups of 6 to discuss their feelings about, and perceptions of workplace learning, and to crystallise questions about teaching and learning based on their discussions. Facilitators will gather the questions and work with the group to make the questions as specific and ‘answerable’ as possible.

Likely themes/questions: Learning taxonomy – how do the module 1 learning taxonomies apply in the workplace? Roles – how are the roles of teacher and learner different in the workplace, and what other ‘teachers’ and ‘learners’ are available in the workplace? Practices – what kinds of workplace learning practices are there, and how does a teacher select from them appropriately? Introducing and discussing relevant theory (LO1) Learning theories – how do behaviourist, constructivist, social constructivist, cognitivist, and reflective learning theories apply in the workplace? Learning taxonomies – How do the cognitive and extra-cognitive taxonomies apply to workplace learning? Roles – Which theories help us think about the learner’s role and the teacher’s role in the workplace? (communities of practice, Lave and Wenger; zone of proximal development & supported participation, Vygotsky / Dornan; identity development) Practices – Observation, simulation, participation, supervision, judgement and assessment, feedback & debrief. Planning workplace learning modifications (LO1)

Study Day 2

Morning Session - Six x 20-minutes slots including 5-minute presentation, 10 minutes debrief, and 5-minute changeover / preparation (part-time facilitated as we rotate through the groups) Peer evaluation of presentations Using a proforma, 5-minute changeover / preparation time. The debrief discussions to evaluate and teach about feedback practice (LO3)

Afternoon session - The focus will be on teaching in clinical practice, the role of the clinical or educational supervisor, feedback, patients as partners in undergraduate medical education and modalities of teaching in clinical areas including useful tips for teaching undergraduate medical students in the clinical environment. What are the drivers for clinical teachers? What are the potential barriers to teaching in the clinical environment?

Online Activity

The on-line environment will be used to anticipate and consolidate learning in the two workshops. Essential reading will be signposted pre- and post the face sessions with a series of activities and tasks designed to promote peer-to peer learning and critical self-reflection.

Week 1 – pre-reading and prior identification of clinical teaching & learning experiences

Week 2 -3 – workshops and contemporaneous reading

Week 4- 7 – reading and structured activities and tasks (including peer review)

Week 8 – review by tutors

Module 2 Assessment:

A plan identifying the modifications to own workplace with peer and own reflections based on presentation feedback 60%
A reflective critique of a colleague’s plans applying relevant theory to practice 40%

Module 3 (MDE61002) - Programme Design

This module is designed to engage participants in the principles and practices of short course/basic curriculum design in the context of their own practice. Participants will be required to apply learning from earlier modules to consider the design of a short programme which is located within a broader curriculum context. A particular emphasis will be placed on designing processes of evaluation and assessment that will improve learner progress and development.

Module Aims:

MA1 Demonstrate the complex and constructed nature of a curriculum or short course
MA2 Explore the importance of embedding good practice in learning and assessment during curriculum and short course development
MA3 Demonstrate a critical understanding of the key stages of a curriculum development cycle and how different curriculum models can support this
MA4 Critically examine the contested and challenging role of assessment in the curriculum and short course design

Module Learning Outcomes:

LO1 Critically evaluate part of an established curriculum including the programme of assessment
LO2 Demonstrate a critical understanding of how own current educational practice fits within the context of a wider curriculum or short course.
LO3 Critically apply principles of curriculum or short course development to their own context taking account of broader learning theories and effective practice in assessment.
LO4 Demonstrate how relevant policy, both locally and nationally, influences curriculum and programme development

Indicative Content:

The overall delivery of the module will be through a blended approach, combining face-to-face workshops and online activities and tasks. Such delivery will be based on broadly constructivist and adult learning principles with knowledge being ‘made’ and shared in the room with some negotiation of the methods used being handed to the learners. The processes will therefore be inherently student-led in terms of scope and pace consistent with engagement with the module learning outcomes. Since most learners will have little direct experience of curriculum or short course development, an emphasis will be placed on the practical application of design theory and principles to learners’ own context and past experience. Learners will have the opportunity through small group work to share and learn from those with both similar and contrasting experience as well as those from cognate and differing disciplines/specialties. Techniques such as ‘cross-over’ groups will be used to facilitate this. These activities will be mixed with mini-presentations and masterclasses so that curriculum knowledge is both derived from as well as shared with the group. An indicative programme follow:

Study Day 1

Morning - Examples of curriculum development theories and good practice including constructive alignment; offer examples and for students to share curriculum development within the confines of their own experience as well as at the broader programme level and beyond.

Afternoon - The roles of assessment within curricula and how different forms of assessment might contribute to the ‘delivery’ of the curriculum - cross-over’ groups working with the following themes:

  • The purposes of assessment
  • Alignment of assessment approaches with LO
  • Quality assurance – How to recognize a good question, Blue printing, and Standard Setting
  • Meaningfully assessment of challenging curriculum areas by applying the principles of programmatic assessment

Study Day 2

Morning - One hour mini-presentations/masterclasses as follows:

  • Admissions and the socio-political influences on admission process
  • International perspectives in curriculum development
  • The Hidden Curriculum

Afternoon - Opportunities to apply the learning through critique and reflection of good practice in curriculum development including the role of assessment in curriculum development. This can be approached through the following activities

  1. Critique/evaluate parts of an established curriculum (this may be centred around assessment)
  2. Addressing a curriculum development problem in their own area
  3. Developing or revising a session/module in their own context
  4. Reflecting on personal assessment experiences in a critical manner evidenced from the literature/policy. Key questions for students to challenge themselves with  Why choose this particular content/learning approach or assessment?
  • How does your learning on PGCert support your approach?
  • How does your focus fit within the bigger picture of your vision for your graduates/learners?
  • Consider an assessment with characteristics that are consistent with its purpose
  • Consider an assessment that is likely to measure the learning in which you are interested

Curriculum terms, Subject & learner-centred curricula, the integrated curriculum, the Tyler Model, curriculum development cycle, designing in assessment for learning, approaches to teaching.

Module 3 Assessment:

Portfolio of assessment materials consisting of 3500-4000 words to evidence and mapped to, each of the module learning outcomes.  These could include:  

  • Poster
  • Mind Map
  • Flow Chart
  • Session outline (providing it demonstrates how it integrates with the wider curricula/programme) short piece of writing demonstrating an understanding of the nature of curriculum as the candidate has synthesized from wider reading of educational literature
  • Key stages of curriculum development demonstrating an appreciation of the practical challenges of implementing these stages, with reference to their own practice

Each piece of evidence must be accompanied by a critical narrative illustrating candidate’s understanding of good practice in developing curriculum including assessment (i.e., why did I do what I did, what should be different)

100%

Reflective Portfolio

One of the key aims of the course is that you should critically reflect on all aspects of learning and teaching included within this course to demonstrate your own professional development as a medical educator. Therefore, we believe that you should have the opportunity throughout the course to reflect on aspects of learning and teaching that are relevant to your personal interests and professional practice. Portfolios consist of a body of work, which can include a number of entries, rather than a single piece of writing and allow a degree of choice in what to include, demonstrating that the relevant assessment criteria have been achieved. Portfolios offer a degree of flexibility for courses where participants are from a range of backgrounds, utilising a variety of teaching methods.


See full course information on our Prospectus

The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it is up-to-date and relevant. Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research, funding changes, professional accreditation requirements, student or employer feedback, outcomes of reviews, and variations in staff or student numbers. In the event of any change we'll consult and inform students in good time and take reasonable steps to minimise disruption.

Information last updated: 19 May 2020


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