Postgraduate course modules

Sheffield is an exciting and versatile place to study music at postgraduate level. We offer excellent opportunity for specialisation and allow you to gain experience with a broad range of research areas, skills and methods by providing opportunities for crossover between specialisms.

MA Composition

Core modules (150 credits total)

MUS6000: Research Techniques (15 credits)

Research Techniques is a general introduction to research methods in music, with particular reference to: (1) bibliographical methods, library resources, on-line and hard-copy abstracts and indices; (2) manuscript sources, discographies, specialist sound/music libraries and other resources; (3) developing a research area; exploring references, following leads and evaluating sources; (4) music processing; (5) presentation skills; (6) current methods in survey/questionnaire/interview techniques; (7) careers skills; (8) professional development; (9) giving and receiving feedback; (10) reflective skills.

MUS666: Interdisciplinary Music Studies (15 credits)

Taking advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment, this module introduces key concepts and debates within composition, ethnomusicology, musicology and performance through discursive critical engagement with key texts in a reading group context. Discussing core topics in the cultural, social and aesthetic study of music in a friendly but rigorous setting, you will learn about the history and morphology of music studies, and gain skills in the critical analysis of academic literature.

MUS627: Collaborative Project (Composition MA) (30 credits)

This module aims to facilitate student-led collaborative projects. Collaborations may be with a performer or ensemble from within or outside the Department of Music, or a practitioner from another artistic discipline, including visual arts, writing, choreography, film-making, etc., who may be from within or outside the University. You will be guided in the planning and execution of your project and will report and reflect on the process throughout the module. Work generated through the collaboration will be presented at the end of the module in a performance, installation, or other format as appropriate.

MUS6018: Composition Portfolio (60 credits)

Creative Portfolio invites the candidate to collate a diverse body of work, including a number of projects of varying sizes. The nature of the projects themselves will determine their length. Projects may include musical compositions, works of sonic art, audio-visual pieces, sound installations, web based media/events, live-electronic performances, interactive media.

MUS624: Composition Dissertation (30 credits)

This module requires you to produce a short dissertation. Students propose a topic for their dissertation; this should normally relate to one or more of the various topics covered during previous modules and must be approved by the module teaching team. Following this, an appropriate supervisor will be allocated and you will be offered a series of regular tutorials that are supported by research seminars. During the course of the module, you will assess, evaluate, analyse, criticise and/or synthesise existing knowledge and produce a coherent and sustained argument that offers advanced insights into your chosen topic.

Optional modules (30 credits total)

MUS643: Electroacoustic Techniques (30 credits)

Electroacoustic Techniques invites you to collate a small portfolio of diverse work that will prepare you for the larger scale projects demanded in Composition Portfolio. Projects may include sonic art work, audio-visual works, installations, web based events etc. You will also contextualise your work within broader concepts; examine media politics, gender issues, the media industry and other aspects of artistic consumption where technology has become both necessary and transparent.

MUS628: Instrumental Techniques (30 credits)

This module will deal with the techniques and methods of instrumental composition relevant to the contemporary composer through a combination of compositional tasks modelled on the practice of a wide range of 20th and 21st Century composers.

MA Music Management

Core modules (105 credits total)

MUS636 Strategic planning for music business clients (15 credits)

Strategic planning for music business clients is practice based as students learn the skills necessary to work in the real world of music management. Students will research an issue faced by a professional music client, drawing conclusions from their research and providing recommendations on how to move forward.

MUS638 Principles of Music Management (30 credits)

Principles of Music Management consists of weekly lectures and seminars, each of which is devoted to exploring key principles underpinning successful music management practice. Thus for example seminars will focus upon audience research and engagement, communication principles for music management and identifying and utilising digital tools and platforms.

MUS629: Dissertation (Music Management) (60 credits)

The dissertation provides the final element in the MA in Music Management. It comprises a dissertation of c.15,000 words requiring original investigation and research by the student on a topic within the area of music management approved by the unit tutor. Learning is supported by on-going individual tutorials.

Optional modules 1 (15 credits total)

MUS6000: Research Techniques (15 credits)

Research Techniques provides a general introduction to research methods in music, with particular reference to : (1) bibliographical methods, library resources, on-line and hard-copy abstracts and indices; (2) manuscript sources, discographies, specialist sound/music libraries and other resources; (3) developing a research area; exploring references, following leads and evaluating sources; (4) music processing; (5) presentation skills; (6) current methods in survey/questionnaire/interview techniques; (7) careers skills; (8) professional development; (9) giving and receiving feedback; (10) reflective skills.

Optional modules 2 (30 credits total)

MGT6043: Accounting and Financial Management (15 credits)

Whether you’re contemplating self-employment or any career in the field of management, an ability to interpret accounting reports and exercise financial judgement is essential. The aim of this module is to equip non-financial students with an appropriate level of financial competence – and confidence – and hence views finance from the perspective of general management: that is, as users of financial information. This means that learning does not take the form of a series of technical exercises but grasping concepts and applying them to the real world, as demonstrated by the module tutors. The accounting element of the module is concerned primarily with the uses and limitations of published financial statements and internal accounting reports and controls. The financial management element of the module examines the role of accounting and market data to support decisions on funding, investment, organisational control and performance monitoring.

MGT6124: Critical Theories and Concepts in the Cultural and Creative Industries (15 credits)

This module aims to provide an overview of the theories, concepts and analytical approaches deployed in research on the cultural and creative industries. It will demonstrate the application of theories and concepts, drawing upon examples of case studies on the cultural and creative industries and will critically assess the relevance of existing theories and concepts to the study of the CCIs in contemporary societies.

MGT6125: Cultural Marketing (15 credits)

Cultural Marketing aims to develop students’ understanding, knowledge and analytical skills in relation to marketing and consumption practices within the Creative and Cultural Industries (CCIs), and specifically in relation to the CCI business context, types of CCI organisations and marketing management practices, as well as aspects of fan, audience and consumer behaviour. The module content includes theoretical approaches to marketing and consumption practices in a range of CCI sectors, for example, film, fine art, music, literature, fashion, performing arts and heritage.

Optional modules 3 (30 credits total)

MGT6121: Managing Festivals, Events and Creative Performances (15 credits)

Managing Festivals, Events and Creative Performances explores the growth development, characteristics, issues and influences relevant to international art fairs, festivals, expos and events and their impact on localities in terms of income generation, providing added value to tourist spaces, and their role in showcasing cultures and cultural products and places. It is primarily concerned with those art fairs, exhibitions and events that either showcase cultures or are located within the broad field of Creative and Cultural Industries, providing access to cultural products and cultural capital.

MGT6123: Fundraising management: sponsorship, philanthropy and the state (15 credits)

This module provides students with an understanding of the various income-generating sources available to the creative and cultural industries. It focuses on how the private sector, business and individuals, has financed the CCIs, and their advantages and disadvantages as funding mechanisms. The module will also explore the changing role of public, government funding as well as assessing the strengths of cultural policy in supporting the financial viability of the sector. The module will be delivered through lectures and group discussion of case studies during seminar sessions.

MGT6126: Managing Creative Brands (15 credits)

Managing Creative Brands aims to develop students’ understanding, knowledge and analytical skills in relation to the management of creative brands within the Creative and Cultural Industries (CCI) context, and specifically in relation to artist(e), group, organisational and other types of brands. The module content includes theoretical approaches to brand management in a range of CCI sectors, for example, film, fine art, music, literature, performing arts and heritage.

Culture and Creative Entrepreneurship, (15 credits)

Entrepreneurship is vital to a flourishing cultural and creative sector. This module bridges the gap between creativity, culture, and business by enabling learners to develop techniques that move their creative and critical thinking to entrepreneurial thinking. The module equips those who have previously studied or engaged with an area of creative or cultural practice, such as music, media, theatre and performance, heritage, craft, design, or digital games, to start a new business arising from existing or new creative and cultural practices, to manage a portfolio of loosely connected projects in the cultural and creative industries, and to develop entrepreneurial skills for innovation in existing organisations in the cultural and creative industries. It enhances learners’ skills as creative leaders who can respond to emerging trends and opportunities to realise value in the creative economy.

MUS637 Staging Music in Theory and Practice (15 credits)

Staging Music in Theory and Practice is practice based as students develop and run a one day music related event within the local community. There will be theoretical input at the start of the course on the nature and impacts of, and planning for, art oriented festivals and events including marketing and the practical application of legal and health and safety principles. 

MA Musicology

Core modules (150 credits total)

MUS6000: Research Techniques (15 credits)

Research Techniques introduces a range of music-related research techniques including defining and designing a research topic, collecting and analysing data, access to unusual research materials from libraries or internet sites, compiling and laying out literature reviews and empirical studies, becoming acquainted with basics of music processing. The unit is delivered via the Department’s Graduate Study Days, which musicology students will attend alongside students from other disciplines in the Department.

MUS6029: Critical Musicology (30 credits)

Critical Musicology acts as an introduction to key trends and figures in musicology from the mid-twentieth century to the present day. You will learn techniques and skills related to the literature in the field, and will employ them in an essay on a topic of your own choice.

MUS6032: Topics in Musicology (30 credits)

Topics in Musicology gives you the opportunity to develop skills and knowledge in a focused area of musicology. You will explore the literature related to a specific topic in depth, and will write an essay that responds to the current state of the literature in this area.

MUS666: Interdisciplinary Music Studies (15 credits)

Taking advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment, this module introduces key concepts and debates within composition, ethnomusicology, musicology and performance through discursive critical engagement with key texts in a reading group context. Discussing core topics in the cultural, social and aesthetic study of music in a friendly but rigorous setting, students will learn about the history and morphology of music studies, and gain skills in the critical analysis of academic literature.

MUS626: Dissertation in Musicology (60 credits)

The Dissertation module gives you the opportunity to design and complete an extended piece of independent research in musicology. Your project could take the form of a written dissertation, a critical edition with commentary, or another closely equivalent format. There is an emphasis on originality, and the module is heavily weighted in anticipation of the especially intensive effort required in achieving this pre-doctoral standard (for example, through archival research). You will be supported through group seminars in which key techniques will be explored; you will then undertake the research under the guidance of a supervisor in tutorial format.

Optional modules (30 credits total)

MUS615: Topics in Music Psychology (30 credits)

Topics in Music Psychology provides an introduction to the core topics in the psychology of music, including psychoacoustics and perception, cognition of musical structure, emotion and meaning in music, development psychology of music, psychological approaches to performance, and social and applied music psychology, including music therapy and music education.

MUS617: Selected Topics in Music Psychology (15 credits)

Topics in Music Psychology provides an introduction to the core topics in the psychology of music, including psychoacoustics and perception, cognition of musical structure, emotion and meaning in music, development psychology of music, psychological approaches to performance, and social and applied music psychology, including music therapy and music education.

MUS618: Qualitative Data Collection (15 credits)

Qualitative Data Collection provides a research training in qualitative research data collection relevant to the study of musical behaviour. The module consists of teaching and learning of qualitative research design techniques, including ethical consideration and evaluation of methods through pilot studies and critique of existing research. The module is assessed through a portfolio of qualitative data collection tools, including questionnaires and interview schedules, which the student has designed, piloted and evaluated.

MUS633: Performing World Music (30 credits)

Performing World Music provides an opportunity to integrate musical practice into the MA in Ethnomusicology. The unit will focus on the music of one tradition hitherto unfamiliar to the class in question, requiring them to learn vocal or instrumental performance in that style. You will back up your practice-based understanding of a world music tradition with a learning diary and theoretical knowledge derived from the ethnomusicological literature. Your learning will lead to a performance examination with an oral component dealing with historical, organological or cultural aspects of the same musical tradition.

MUS635: Special Study in Performance (30 credits)

Special Study in Performance will introduce students to a specialist area of study in performance studies, such as historical performance practice. By engaging in written research and in practical demonstration, students will be introduced to performance as a research-informed discipline. The module will include a mixture of lecture-based demonstrations and workshop-led learning, and will culminate in a small topic of the student's own choice, related to the general theme of the module.

MUS636: Strategic Planning for Music Business Clients (15 credits)

Strategic planning for music business clients is practice based as students learn the skills necessary to work in the real world of music management. Students will research an issue faced by a professional music client, drawing conclusions from their research and providing recommendations on how to move forward.

MUS637: Staging Music in Theory and Practice (15 credits)

Staging Music in Theory and Practice is practice based as students develop and run a one day music related event within the local community. There will be theoretical input at the start of the course on the nature and impacts of, and planning for, art oriented festivals and events including marketing and the practical application of legal and health and safety principles.

MUS639: Communicating about music and music research (15 credits)

This exciting new module is delivered in collaboration with the English Language Teaching Centre, and is directed at all students who wish to work on English communication skills - written and oral, in order to reach a variety of audiences interested in music and music research. Assessments for this module provide opportunities to improve academic writing skills, which can benefit performance in other modules. They also offer the opportunity to engage with a broad spectrum of written and oral communication, useful for academic and professional contexts.

MUS627: Collaborative Project (Composition MA) (30 credits)

This module aims to facilitate student-led collaborative projects. Collaborations may be with a performer or ensemble from within or outside the Department of Music, or a practitioner from another artistic discipline, including visual arts, writing, choreography, film-making, etc., who may be from within or outside the University. You will be guided in the planning and execution of your project and will report and reflect on the process throughout the module. Work generated through the collaboration will be presented at the end of the module in a performance, installation, or other format as appropriate.

MA Music Performance Studies

Core modules (90 credits total)

MUS6000: Research Techniques (15 credits)

Research Techniques is a general introduction to research methods in music, with particular reference to: (1) bibliographical methods, library resources, on-line and hard-copy abstracts and indices; (2) manuscript sources, discographies, specialist sound/music libraries and other resources; (3) developing a research area; exploring references, following leads and evaluating sources; (4) music processing; (5) presentation skills; (6) current methods in survey/questionnaire/interview techniques; (7) careers skills; (8) professional development; (9) giving and receiving feedback; (10) reflective skills.

MUS640: Advanced Ensemble Performance Skills (30 credits)

Advanced Ensemble Performance Skills aims to develop students’ ensemble performance skills to an advanced level by taking a critical and reflective perspective on one’s performance in an ensemble context, considering the role of musicians in accompaniment and chamber music settings, and by researching relevant aspects of ensemble performance related to repertoire, musical communication, and performance expression. This module has an extensive practical component with students working with other MA and UG students towards a 15-minute recital examination. There is also a 2000-word portfolio including a critical reflection on musical communication, the rehearsal process and the repertoire choices with reference to existing performances.

MUS634: Recital (60 credits)

Your Recital work will be supported and supplemented by individual instrumental tuition. The module culminates in a 45-minute public recital demonstrating keen stylistic awareness, accomplished technical control, imaginative use of colour and texture. You will engage with the audience in expressing their interpretations of chosen repertoire at a professional standard.

Optional modules 1 (45 credits total)

MUS635: Special Study in Performance (30 credits)

Special Study in Performance will introduce students to a specialist area of study in performance studies, such as historical performance practice. By engaging in written research and in practical demonstration, students will be introduced to performance as a research-informed discipline. The module will include a mixture of lecture-based demonstrations and workshop-led learning, and will culminate in a small topic of the student's own choice, related to the general theme of the module.

MUS627: Collaborative Project (Composition MA) (30 credits)

The Collaborative Project aims to facilitate student-led collaborative projects. Collaborations may be with a performer or ensemble from within or outside the Department of Music, or a practitioner from another artistic discipline, including visual arts, writing, choreography, film-making, etc., who may be from within or outside the University. You will be guided in the planning and execution of your project and will report and reflect on the process throughout the module. Work generated through the collaboration will be presented at the end of the module in a performance, installation, or other format as appropriate.

MUS666: Interdisciplinary Music Studies (15 credits)

Taking advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment, this module introduces key concepts and debates within composition, ethnomusicology, musicology and performance through discursive critical engagement with key texts in a reading group context. Discussing core topics in the cultural, social and aesthetic study of music in a friendly but rigorous setting, students will learn about the history and morphology of music studies, and gain skills in the critical analysis of academic literature.

MUS639: Communicating about music and music research (15 credits)

This exciting new module is delivered in collaboration with the English Language Teaching Centre, and is directed at all students who wish to work on English communication skills - written and oral, in order to reach a variety of audiences interested in music and music research. Assessments for this module provide opportunities to improve academic writing skills, which can benefit performance in other modules. They also offer the opportunity to engage with a broad spectrum of written and oral communication, useful for academic and professional contexts.

Optional modules 2 (30 credits total)

MUS6029: Critical Musicology (30 credits)

Critical Musicology acts as an introduction to key trends and figures in musicology from the mid-twentieth century to the present day. You will learn techniques and skills related to the literature in the field, and will employ them in an essay on a topic of your own choice.

MUS6032: Topics in Musicology (30 credits)

Topics in Musicology gives you the opportunity to develop skills and knowledge in a focused area of musicology. You will explore the literature related to a specific topic in depth, and will write an essay that responds to the current state of the literature in this area.

MUS615: Topics in Music Psychology (30 credits)

Topics in Music Psychology provides an introduction to the core topics in the psychology of music, including psychoacoustics and perception, cognition of musical structure, emotion and meaning in music, development psychology of music, psychological approaches to performance, and social and applied music psychology, including music therapy and music education.

MUS617: Selected Topics in Music Psychology (15 credits)

Topics in Music Psychology provides an introduction to the core topics in the psychology of music, including psychoacoustics and perception, cognition of musical structure, emotion and meaning in music, development psychology of music, psychological approaches to performance, and social and applied music psychology, including music therapy and music education.

MUS618: Qualitative Data Collection (15 credits)

Qualitative Data Collection provides a research training in qualitative research data collection relevant to the study of musical behaviour. The module consists of teaching and learning of qualitative research design techniques, including ethical consideration and evaluation of methods through pilot studies and critique of existing research. The module is assessed through a portfolio of qualitative data collection tools, including questionnaires and interview schedules, which the student has designed, piloted and evaluated.

MUS633: Performing World Music (30 credits)

Performing World Music provides an opportunity to integrate musical practice into the MA in Ethnomusicology. The unit will focus on the music of one tradition hitherto unfamiliar to the class in question, requiring them to learn vocal or instrumental performance in that style. You will back up your practice-based understanding of a world music tradition with a learning diary and theoretical knowledge derived from the ethnomusicological literature. Your learning will lead to a performance examination with an oral component dealing with historical, organological or cultural aspects of the same musical tradition.

MUS636: Strategic planning for music business clients (15 credits)

Strategic planning for music business clients is practice based as students learn the skills necessary to work in the real world of music management. Students will research an issue faced by a professional music client, drawing conclusions from their research and providing recommendations on how to move forward.

MUS637: Staging Music in Theory and Practice (15 credits)

Staging Music in Theory and Practice is practice based as students develop and run a one day music related event within the local community. There will be theoretical input at the start of the course on the nature and impacts of, and planning for, art oriented festivals and events including marketing and the practical application of legal and health and safety principles.

MUS639: Communicating about music and music research (15 credits)

This exciting new module is delivered in collaboration with the English Language Teaching Centre, and is directed at all students who wish to work on English communication skills - written and oral, in order to reach a variety of audiences interested in music and music research. Assessments for this module provide opportunities to improve academic writing skills, which can benefit performance in other modules. They also offer the opportunity to engage with a broad spectrum of written and oral communication, useful for academic and professional contexts.

MUS666: Interdisciplinary Music Studies (15 credits)

Taking advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment, this module introduces key concepts and debates within composition, ethnomusicology, musicology and performance through discursive critical engagement with key texts in a reading group context. Discussing core topics in the cultural, social and aesthetic study of music in a friendly but rigorous setting, students will learn about the history and morphology of music studies, and gain skills in the critical analysis of academic literature.

MA Psychology of Music

Core modules (90 credits total)

MUS6000: Research Techniques (15 credits)

MUS6000: Research Techniques introduces research methods in music, with particular reference to : (1) bibliographical methods, library resources, on-line and hard-copy abstracts and indices; (2) manuscript sources, discographies, specialist sound/music libraries and other resources; (3) developing a research area; exploring references, following leads and evaluating sources; (4) music processing; (5) presentation skills; (6) current methods in survey/questionnaire/interview techniques; (7) careers skills; (8) professional development; (9) giving and receiving feedback; (10) reflective skills.

MUS641 Advanced issues in Psychology of Music (15 credits)

Advanced issues in Psychology of Music provides the opportunity to consider, in-depth, an advanced topic within Psychology of Music through studying a relevant body of recent research literature, analyse and reflect on the research methodologies used to investigate the topic, and explore how research and its findings may be disseminated and be of interest to audiences beyond academia.

MUS6020 Dissertation (60 credits)

The dissertation provides the final element in the MA Psychology of Music course. It requires original investigation and research on a topic within the area of music psychology approved by the unit tutor. Learning is supported by ongoing tutorials.

Optional modules 1 (minimum 15 credits, maximum 30 credits)

MUS615: Topics in Music Psychology (30 credits)

MUS615: Topics in Music Psychology provides an introduction to the core topics in the psychology of music, including psychoacoustics and perception, cognition of musical structure, emotion and meaning in music, development psychology of music, psychological approaches to performance, and social and applied music psychology, including music therapy and music education.

MUS617: Selected Topics in Music Psychology (15 credits)

Topics in Music Psychology provides an introduction to the core topics in the psychology of music, including psychoacoustics and perception, cognition of musical structure, emotion and meaning in music, development psychology of music, psychological approaches to performance, and social and applied music psychology, including music therapy and music education.

Optional modules 2 (minimum 45 credits, maximum 60 credits)

MUS613: Quantitative Research Techniques (30 credits)

This module provides training in quantitative research techniques relevant to the study of musical behaviour. The module consists of teaching and learning of statistical techniques in a computer-lab setting, plus a group project in which an empirical study is partially designed and fully executed and analysed.

MUS614: Qualitative Research Techniques (30 credits)

Assessed by a group research project involving qualitative research techniques and analysis.

MUS618: Qualitative Data Collection (15 credits)

Qualitative Data Collection provides a research training in qualitative research data collection relevant to the study of musical behaviour. The module consists of teaching and learning of qualitative research design techniques, including ethical consideration and evaluation of methods through pilot studies and critique of existing research. The module is assessed through a portfolio of qualitative data collection tools, including questionnaires and interview schedules, which the student has designed, piloted and evaluated.

MUS619: Statistics in Music Psychology (15 credits)

Statistics in Music Psychology provides a research training in quantitative research techniques relevant to the study of musical behaviour. The module consists of teaching and learning of statistical techniques in a computer-lab setting.

If a student takes MUS613, they may not also take MUS619. If a student takes MUS614, they may not also take MUS618.

Optional modules 3 (30 credits total)

Students may take up to 30 credits from any MA level module within the university, subject to the agreement of the MA course director.

MA/PG Cert Music Psychology in Education, Performance and Wellbeing (distance learning)

MA Year 1 modules (90 credits total)

MUS6080: Musical Development (30 credits)

MUS6080: Musical Development helps you develop an understanding of the psychological and biological processes that affect musical development in the first fourteen years of life. Emphasis is also placed on applying this understanding to music teaching and learning contexts, evaluating existing research and developmental themes.

MUS6090: The Psychology of Performance (30 credits)

MUS6090: The Psychology of Performance provides an understanding of the psychological processes involved in playing music, exploring the existing research literature and methodology. Students explore how this understanding can be applied to the experience of listening to and performing music.

MUS6025: Researching Music in Everyday Life and Wellbeing (30 credits)

This module considers the applications of psychological research to everyday musical behaviour and events. Topics covered include emotional responses to music; listening in the home, car and workplace; music in commercial and public settings; musical participation; music therapy and special education. You are encouraged to analyse your own everyday experiences of music in relation to the psychology of music literature, and to consider the methodological and ethical challenges of researching in real world settings.

MA Year 2 modules (90 credits total)

MUS642: Psychological Research Methods (30 credits)

Awaiting module description.

MUS6026: Dissertation in Music Psychology (60 credits)

Your dissertation allows you to investigate a research question in the psychology of music, which may be empirical or theoretical. You are required to submit a dissertation which shows an awareness of established literature in the field, of appropriate data collection and analysis, and of interpretation of results or theories.

PG Cert modules (60 credits total)

MUS6080: Musical Development (30 credits)

MUS6080: Musical Development helps you develop an understanding of the psychological and biological processes that affect musical development in the first fourteen years of life. Emphasis is also placed on applying this understanding to music teaching and learning contexts, evaluating existing research and developmental themes.

MUS6090: The Psychology of Performance (30 credits)

MUS6090: The Psychology of Performance provides an understanding of the psychological processes involved in playing music, exploring the existing research literature and methodology. Students explore how this understanding can be applied to the experience of listening to and performing music.

MUS6025: Researching Music in Everyday Life and Wellbeing (30 credits)

This module considers the applications of psychological research to everyday musical behaviour and events. Topics covered include emotional responses to music; listening in the home, car and workplace; music in commercial and public settings; musical participation; music therapy and special education. You are encouraged to analyse your own everyday experiences of music in relation to the psychology of music literature, and to consider the methodological and ethical challenges of researching in real world settings.

MA Traditional and World Music (distance learning)

Year 1 - Autumn semester (45 credits total)

MUS6002: Research Skills (15 credits)

MUS6002: Research Skills provides essential research and study skills necessary for successful completion of the MA in World Music Studies as a whole (bibliographic skills and accessing web resources; editing and revision skills; style sheets; music processing; note-taking and essay planning). It begins at the residential with practical instruction in lectures, seminars and demonstration in several skills, covering both effective music research and efficient distance learning. A series of e-tutorials accompanied by skill-based work-sheets follows on from the work done at the residential.

and one of the following:

MUS6003: Music of the World (30 credits)

MUS6003: Music of the World provides a foundation in the study of music from each continent. The module begins at the residential, which includes practical workshops in several musical studies, lectures and seminars, plus a series of e-tutorials. The remainder of the unit is taught through listening and reading-based self-study.

MUS6035: Traditional Music of the British Isles (30 credits)

MUS6035: Traditional Music of the British Isles provides a foundation in the study of significant musical traditions from across the British Isles. It begins with one residential, which includes practical workshops in several musical styles, lectures and seminars, plus a series of e-tutorials. The remainder of the unit is taught through listening- and reading-based self study, leading to an essay on one musical tradition, a sample transcription and analysis with commentary and an annotated bibliography of sources for further research.

Year 1 - Spring semester (45 credits total)

MUS6005: Case Studies in Ethnomusicology (15 credits)

This module focuses on analysis of selected key texts in ethnomusicology. Examples of these include: How Musical is Man? (Blacking), Sardinian Chronicles (Lortat-Jacob), Soul of Mbira (Berliner). Lectures during the residential will introduce the history of ethnomusicology as a discipline. Study of the three books will be supported by guidance sheets keyed to each chapter and e-tutorials.

MUS6004: Approaches to Fieldwork (30 credits)

Introduction to designing an independent field project consisting of supervised fieldwork exercises (held in Sheffield during the residential) and subsequent self-study (supported by e-tutorials) and a programme of assisted readings. Instruction will cover project design, participant observation methodology, ethical issues and use of recording technology.

Year 2 - Autumn semester (30 credits total)

MUS6038: Teaching and Transmission (30 credits)

This module enables students to explore, from a global perspective, issues relating to the ways in which music is taught and learned. Lectures during the second residential provide intellectual frameworks for the wide range of possible topics that this broad category of musical behaviour encompasses (e.g. formal education in vernacular musics; the impacts of oral/written transmissive media; teaching world music(s) in the classroom, etc.). After the residential, the student selects one topic for independent study and undertakes research supported by guided reading, online discussion and e-tutorials. A variety of assessment formats are provided for each project, with students selecting either an essay, folio with commentary or sample radio programme/podcast.

Year 2 - Spring semester (60 credits total)

MUS6007: Dissertation (60 credits)

The dissertation provides the final element in the MA in World Music Studies. It comprises a library or fieldwork-based dissertation or folio requiring original investigation and research by the student on a topic within the area of world music approved by the unit tutor. Original field materials may be submitted as appendices to the dissertation.

The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it is up-to-date and relevant. Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research, funding changes, professional accreditation requirements, student or employer feedback, outcomes of reviews, and variations in staff or student numbers. In the event of any change we'll consult and inform students in good time and take reasonable steps to minimise disruption.

Information last updated: 6 November 2019


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