MA Psychology of Music


Duration

One year (full-time) or two years (part-time).

Semesters

The teaching component of the programme is based on Autumn and Spring semesters. Over the summer you will complete your dissertation in consultation with an academic supervisor.

Qualification

This programme is offered as a MA (180 credits).

Assessment

The taught programme is continuously assessed. The continuous assessment takes a variety of forms such as reports and essays. They are usually individual assessments, even if they concern the processes and outcomes of group work. For further information, please visit the online prospectus.

This is the module outline for 2018/19 Entry and is subject to change for 2019/20

Modules

All students will take

  • MUS6000: Research Techniques (15 credits)
    MUS6000: Research Techniques introduces research methods in music, with particular reference to : (1) bibliographical methods, library resources, on-line and hard-copy abstracts and indices; (2) manuscript sources, discographies, specialist sound/music libraries and other resources; (3) developing a research area; exploring references, following leads and evaluating sources; (4) music processing; (5) presentation skills; (6) current methods in survey/questionnaire/interview techniques; (7) careers skills; (8) professional development; (9) giving and receiving feedback; (10) reflective skills.
  • MUS6070 Research Design (15 credits)
    Research Design introduces you to the process of finding and refining a topic of research for a Masters dissertation. A preliminary dissertation proposal is submitted in the first semester after which a dissertation tutor is assigned. A more detailed proposal, forming the assessment, is submitted in semester 2, presenting a summary of the scope of research with reference to existing literature, methods to be employed and a detailed time-scale for completion of the research.
  • MUS6020 Dissertation (60 credits)
    The dissertation provides the final element in the MA Psychology of Music course. It requires original investigation and research on a topic within the area of music psychology approved by the unit tutor. Learning is supported by ongoing tutorials.

 

A student will take units to the value of 30 credits from 2A and 2B below

Group 2A - students will take a minimum of 15 and a maximum of 30 credits from this group

  • MUS615: Topics in Music Psychology (30 credits)
    MUS615: Topics in Music Psychology provides an introduction to the core topics in the psychology of music, including psychoacoustics and perception, cognition of musical structure, emotion and meaning in music, development psychology of music, psychological approaches to performance, and social and applied music psychology, including music therapy and music education.
  • MUS617: Selected Topics in Music Psychology (15 credits)
    Topics in Music Psychology provides an introduction to the core topics in the psychology of music, including psychoacoustics and perception, cognition of musical structure, emotion and meaning in music, development psychology of music, psychological approaches to performance, and social and applied music psychology, including music therapy and music education.

 

Group 2B - students will take up to 15 credits from this group

  • IPA650: Language in Use: an introduction to corpus-based linguistics (15 credits)
    This module is no longer available
  • PSY6305: Fundamentals of Cognitive Neuroscience (15 credits)
    Fundamentals of Cognitive Neuroscience provides an overview of the fundamental issues in cognitive neuroscience and its contributory disciplines. The approach taken is in terms of its development over the past 50 years, providing an overview of the key concepts in the information processing approach and in cognitive science, followed by an analysis of the advances that have been made recently using cognitive neuroscience techniques. Topics include: fundamental issues in cognition (memory, attention, learning, language). Theoretical approaches including cognitive neuropsychology, symbolic and sub-symbolic modelling, and methodological issues.

A student will take units to the value of 60 credits from 3A and 3B below

Group 3A - students will take a minimum of 45 and a maximum of 60 credits from this group

  • MUS613: Quantitative Research Techniques (30 credits)
  • This module provides training in quantitative research techniques relevant to the study of musical behaviour. The module consists of teaching and learning of statistical techniques in a computer-lab setting, plus a group project in which an empirical study is partially designed and fully executed and analysed.
  • MUS614: Qualitative Research Techniques (30 credits)
    Assessed by a group research project involving qualitative research techniques and analysis.
  • MUS618: Qualitative Data Collection (15 credits)
    Qualitative Data Collection provides a research training in qualitative research data collection relevant to the study of musical behaviour. The module consists of teaching and learning of qualitative research design techniques, including ethical consideration and evaluation of methods through pilot studies and critique of existing research. The module is assessed through a portfolio of qualitative data collection tools, including questionnaires and interview schedules, which the student has designed, piloted and evaluated.
  • MUS619: Statistics in Music Psychology (15 credits)
    Statistics in Music Psychology provides a research training in quantitative research techniques relevant to the study of musical behaviour. The module consists of teaching and learning of statistical techniques in a computer-lab setting.

If a student takes MUS613 they may not also take MUS619.
If a student takes MUS614 they may not also take MUS618.

Group 3B - students will take a maximum of 15 credits from this group

  • PSY6316: Current Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience (15 credits)
    This module is no longer available for the 2018/19 academic year.
  • MUS639: Communicating about music and music research (15 credits)
    This exciting new module is delivered in collaboration with the English Language teaching Centre, and is directed at all students who with to work on English communication skills - written and oral, in order to reach a variety of audiences interested in music and music research. Assessments for this module provide opportunities to improve academic writing skill,s which can benefit performance in other modules. They also offer the opportunity to engage with a broad spectrum of written and oral communication, useful for academic and professional contexts./div>

The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it is current and relevant. Individual modules may be updated or withdrawn in response to discoveries through our world-leading research, funding changes, professional accreditation requirements, student or employer feedback, curriculum review, staff availability, and variations in student numbers. In the event of a material change the University will inform students in good time and will take reasonable steps to minimise disruption.