Dr Anne Macgregor

Profile Picture of Anne MacgregorDepartment of Music
The University of Sheffield
Jessop Building
34 Leavygreave Road
Sheffield
S3 7RD

Email: a.e.macgregor@sheffield.ac.uk


Biography

I studied piano at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland under Fali Pavri and Philip Jenkins, where I won prizes for both performance and academic work, developed a specialism in vocal accompaniment, and established a piano duo partnership with Silviya Mihaylova. It was also during my time in Glasgow that I first encountered the richness and beauty of Nordic art-song, and after several years of freelancing, I undertook my doctoral studies at the University of Nottingham in order to explore this rarely-heard repertoire.

My doctoral research (funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council) considered the songs of the Swedish composer Ture Rangström (1884-1947) as expressions of identity. My work is the first English-language scholarship on Rangström, and opens a window into the cultural, social and political context of early-twentieth-century Sweden. It focuses particularly on the ways in which national identity can be constructed and expressed through music and its reception, and highlights the centrality of landscape in Rangström’s life, music, and identity.

Research Interests

  • Nordic art-song
  • music and identity
  • music and nationalism
  • reception histories

Selected Publications

  • ‘Ture Rangström: Symphonie Nr. 2 D-moll “Mitt land”’, preface to the score. Munich: Musikproduktion Höflich, 2018.
  • ‘“He is a piece of granite.” Landscape and national identity in early twentieth-century Sweden’ (forthcoming in ‘Geography, Music, Space’, Musicology Research, Autumn 2018).
  • ‘Liszt and his contemporaries’ (forthcoming in Liszt in Context, ed. Joanne Cormac, Cambridge University Press).
  • ‘Searching for the “genuinely national” in the songs of Ture Rangström’. Society for Music Analysis, University of Surrey, September 2017.
  • ‘The half-truths of Ture Rangström’s Tristans död’. TORCH Nordic Network, University of Oxford, June 2017.
  • ‘Ture Rangström as “living propaganda”: the transplantation of speech-melody and the power of the invisible’. Border Crossings, University of Stirling, June 2016.
  • ‘“Ducking under the edge of history’s mirror”: national identity and regional diversity in early twentieth-century Sweden’. Historical Perspectives: Hidden Histories, University of Edinburgh, June 2016.
  • ‘Setting the “unsingable”: the contexts and challenges of Ture Rangström’s språkmelodi’. Languages, Texts and Society, University of Nottingham, April 2016.
  • ‘Song for a shieldmaiden? Portrayals of identity in Ture Rangström’s Sköldmön’. Music and the Nordic Breakthrough, University of Oxford, September 2015.