Climate change has long-term impact on species adaptability

  • Research on the alpine marmot has shown historic climate change has lasting impact on genetic diversity
  • Experts found that the large rodent lost its genetic diversity during the last ice age as a consequence of multiple climate related adaptations
  • Despite large population sizes, the lack of genetic variation means marmots could struggle to survive or adapt to new environmental conditions, putting them at risk of extinction
  • The findings could help us re-evaluate how we assess a species' extinction risk and help us to develop new, more effective conservation efforts.

A family of marmots

Historic climate change events can have a lasting impact on the genetic diversity of a species, a new study by the University of Sheffield - which analysed the genome of the alpine marmot - has revealed.

An iconic animal known to tourists and mountaineers, the alpine marmot is a large rodent exquisitely adapted to cold climates. Since the disappearance of its ice-age habitat, the alpine marmot has resided in high-altitude meadows in the Alps.

In this new study published in the journal Current Biology and co-led by the Francis Crick Institute, an international team of scientists sequenced the genomes of alpine marmots living in three sites in the French and Italian Alps. The team found that the animal’s genetic diversity is among the lowest of wild mammals. By reconstructing the marmot’s genetic past with the help of fossil records, they discovered that it lost its genetic diversity during the last ice age as a consequence of multiple climate related adaptations.

Toni Gossmann, first-author of the paper and researcher at the University of Sheffield and Bielefeld University in Germany, said: "We would not have expected the genetic diversity of alpine marmots to be so low.

"They have a large population size, and we found little genetic evidence of inbreeding. But ironically, the very adaptations that helped them survive have trapped them in a state of low genetic diversity."

Marmots have a large population size, and we found little genetic evidence of inbreeding. But ironically, the very adaptations that helped them survive have trapped them in a state of low genetic diversity."

Toni Gossmann, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences at the University of Sheffield

A slow metabolism was advantageous to marmots during the ice age, enabling them to build up large fat reserves that could help them survive through hibernation. Similarly, marmots that invested in a small number of ‘high quality’ offspring, rather than having lots of offspring who wouldn't survive the harsh conditions, passed their genes onto the next generation. Over time, a slower breeding cycle and lower mutation rate caused the gene pool to shrink.

As the ice-age ended around 12,000 years ago, the animals were forced to retreat to the high Alps to escape the warming climate. This lead to a bottleneck effect and meant that the surviving marmots were even more genetically similar. Surprisingly, they have not recovered from this bottleneck over time.

Even though alpine marmots are abundant in number, being genetically similar to each other means that they could struggle to adapt to and survive new environmental conditions such as the introduction of a new disease, or further changes in climate.

"If genetic variation is important for future adaptation, then it’s not enough to consider current population size, you need to consider life history to get the full picture," said John Welch, Lecturer in Genetics at the University of Cambridge, and co-author of the study.

Markus Ralser, Crick senior group leader and head of the Charité Institute of Biochemistry, who led the study, added: "We should take the results of the study seriously, as we can see similar warnings from the past. In the 19th century, the passenger pigeon was one of the most abundant land birds in the Northern Hemisphere, yet in spite of its high numbers, it was completely wiped out within a few years. A large population isn’t necessarily safe from extinction in the face of climate change."

A next step for the research would be to investigate more closely other animals that survived the ice age. This could reveal other species trapped in a state of low genetic diversity, that would be more vulnerable to climate change and other environmental changes.

It is hoped that improved understanding of how species adapt to changing environments could help us re-evaluate how we assess a species' extinction risk, in turn helping us to develop new, more effective conservation efforts.

Additional information

The research was funded by the Francis Crick Institute, which receives its core funding from Cancer Research UK, the UK Medical Research Council and the Wellcome Trust, in addition to individual researcher funding.

The Francis Crick Institute is a biomedical discovery institute dedicated to understanding the fundamental biology underlying health and disease. Its work is helping to understand why disease develops and to translate discoveries into new ways to prevent, diagnose and treat illnesses such as cancer, heart disease, stroke, infections, and neurodegenerative diseases. An independent organisation, its founding partners are the Medical Research Council (MRC), Cancer Research UK, Wellcome, UCL (University College London), Imperial College London and King’s College London. The Crick was formed in 2015, and in 2016 it moved into a brand new state-of-the-art building in central London which brings together 1500 scientists and support staff working collaboratively across disciplines, making it the biggest biomedical research facility under a single roof in Europe.

The University of Sheffield
With almost 29,000 of the brightest students from over 140 countries, learning alongside over 1,200 of the best academics from across the globe, the University of Sheffield is one of the world’s leading universities.

A member of the UK’s prestigious Russell Group of leading research-led institutions, Sheffield offers world-class teaching and research excellence across a wide range of disciplines.

Unified by the power of discovery and understanding, staff and students at the university are committed to finding new ways to transform the world we live in.

Sheffield is the only university to feature in The Sunday Times 100 Best Not-For-Profit Organisations to Work For 2018 and for the last eight years has been ranked in the top five UK universities for Student Satisfaction by Times Higher Education.

Sheffield has six Nobel Prize winners among former staff and students and its alumni go on to hold positions of great responsibility and influence all over the world, making significant contributions in their chosen fields.
Global research partners and clients include Boeing, Rolls-Royce, Unilever, AstraZeneca, Glaxo SmithKline, Siemens and Airbus, as well as many UK and overseas government agencies and charitable foundations.

Contact

For further information, please contact:

Shemina Davis
Media Relations Manager
The University of Sheffield
0114 222 5339
shemina.davis@sheffield.ac.uk