Reproduction

RD1

Our research on Reproductive and Developmental Medicine spans the spectrum of gamete development, through fertilization and human pregnancy and birth. We specialise in research into reproductive failure and infertility as well as fetal/obstetric imaging to diagnose problems during pregnancy and the management of pre-term birth.

Dilly Anumba

Professor Dilly Anumba

Email: d.o.c.anumba@sheffield.ac.uk

I investigate the physiology of human parturition, particularly the role of immunity and inflammation in term/preterm labour and pregnancy complications such as hypertension, fetal growth restriction and stillbirth. I am also investigating new techniques to predict preterm birth by the detection of cervical remodelling changes as well as changes in the vaginal microbiome and metabolome. I run specialist clinics in Prenatal Diagnosis and Fetal Therapy, Prematurity Prevention, and High-Risk Pregnancy, all of which have research spin-offs.

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Neil Chapman

Dr Neil Chapman

Email: n.r.chapman@sheffield.ac.uk

Research focuses on learning how the womb reads its genome book when such inflammatory chemicals are present. Also, interest in finding out which parts of the book (i.e. which genes) the womb cells use before labour starts, when there is very little inflammation around, because understanding this change may allow us to understand how the womb muscle cells start contracting too early in some women who then go into labour prematurely.

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Alireza Fazeli

Professor Alireza Fazeli

Email: a.fazeli@sheffield.ac.uk

I am interested in the cross-talk between gametes and embryos, and the maternal tract. Since the innate immune system plays a major role in this communication I am keen to understand how the innate immunity is involved in this maternal communication.

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Mark Fenwick

Dr Mark Fenwick

Email: m.a.fenwick@sheffield.ac.uk

The ovary is an incredibly dynamic organ that is constantly producing and responding to internal molecular ‘cues’.   Both environmental and genetic factors can exert influences on these internal signals, leading to dysregulation or failure of oocytes to develop. We are interested in understanding how these cues (i) coordinate the development of oocytes for ovulation and (ii) produce steroid hormones for other reproductive processes.

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Allan Pacey

Professor Allan Pacey

Email: a.pacey@sheffield.ac.uk

The biology of human spermatozoa and aspects of semen quality and fertility in males.

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Elspeth Whitby

Dr Elspeth Whitby

Email: e.whitby@sheffield.ac.uk

Imaging of the neonate with MR and imaging of the post-mortem fetus and neonate with MR in both the research and clinical settings.

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