Philosophy undergraduate modules

The Philosophy course at Sheffield is made up of modules, each of which considers a particular area or topic in philosophy.

Scales and a hammer represent criminal justice

Our course has been designed so that there are no core (compulsory) modules. Instead, you will gain a solid understanding of the ideas and theories that are the foundation of the discipline, across the full range of our modules. You will therefore have the flexibility to construct your own pathway through the degree, in line with their particular interests. Your lecturers will help you do this.

The philosophy course also allows you to study a small number of modules from other departments. We encourage you to take advantage of this opportunity to broaden your university education.

Dual honours students – those studying philosophy with another subject – take around half their modules in philosophy, and the others with their partner department.

Our degree courses

We are constantly developing our courses so it is possible that the modules running during your time at Sheffield may differ slightly from those currently available. What follows is a typical list of the first, second and third year modules we offer.

How our research informs our module teaching


Modules by year

You must take 120 credits in total during your first year.

Single honours students must take at least 60 credits in Philosophy, including at least 20 credits from Group A, and at least 20 credits from Group B.

Dual honours students can select any modules from group A and/or B and normally choose a minimum of 40 credits in Philosophy. Depending on the credit requirements of your other subject, you may also be able to take optional modules outside of these subjects.

Here is a typical list of options. Click on the module titles to read a description.

Group A modules

Elementary Logic. 10 Credits.

The course will provide students with knowledge of the fundamental parts of formal logic. It will also teach them a range of associated formal techniques with which they can then analyse and assess arguments. In particular, they will learn the languages of propositional and first-order logic, and they will learn how to use those languages in providing formal representations of everyday claims. They will also learn how to use truth-tables and truth-trees.

History of Philosophical Ideas. 10 credits.

The history of philosophy is made up of a series of debates between competing philosophical traditions and schools: for example, idealists argue with realists, rationalists with empiricists. And at different times, distinctive philosophical movements have dominated the discussion, such as pragmatism, existentialism, phenomenology, analytic philosophy, and critical theory. This module will introduce you to some of these central movements and traditions in the history of philosophy from Plato onwards, and the key philosophical concepts and issues that they have brought in to western thought.

Knowledge, Justification and Doubt. 10 Credits.

In our age of "post-truth" politics and "fake news", this course aims to introduce students to philosophy by investigating some basic problems in epistemology (i.e. the philosophical study of knowledge). We will address questions such as: what knowledge is and why it is important; what truth is; what kinds of things can be known and how; if and how perceptual experience gives us knowledge of an “external” world; whether all knowledge has to be grounded in experience; whether knowledge is socially constructed (and if so whether that is necessarily problematic); what role justice plays in our epistemic practices.

Mind, Brain and Personal Identity. 20 Credits.

What is it to have a mind? Is your mind a physical thing, such as your brain? Or is it a non-physical soul attached, somehow, to a physical body? Do human beings have free will-the ability to freely choose their own actions-and, if so, how? What makes me, now, the same person as I was when I was a young child? Or am I perhaps not really the same person at all? How is personal identity like identity for things other than persons-what makes a ship at one time identical to a ship at another time? Do non-human animals have minds? Could computers or robots have artificially created minds? If animals or computers had minds would they have souls? Could they have free will? This course will examine these issues and some historical and contemporary attempts to understand them.

Philosophy of Science. 10 credits.

The aim of this module is to introduce some of the philosophical issues that arise in science and through reflecting on science: how we should represent scientific theories, what counts as evidence for these theories, how scientific explanations work, and how far we can treat science as revealing to us the truth about the underlying nature of reality? 

Reason and Argument. 10 Credits.

Arguments are everywhere - in our newspapers, on our television screens and radios, in books and academic papers, on blogs and other websites. The ability to recognise, evaluate and produce arguments is therefore immeasurably valuable in every aspect of life. This course will teach you how to recognise an argument, how to understand it, how to evaluate and criticise it, and how to produce your own. Students in this module will learn how to extract an argument from a complex text, how to uncover hidden assumptions, and how to recognise and critique bad reasoning.

Writing Philosophy. 20 credits. 

Philosophical writing is a skill that you, the student, must hone early on in order to succeed in your degree. It is also a transferable skill that will serve you in your post-academic career. Philosophical writing combines the general virtues of clarity, organization, focus and style found in other academic writing with particular philosophical virtues, namely, the ability to expose the implicit assumptions of analysed texts and to make explicit the logical structure of one's own and other people's arguments. A precondition for philosophical writing is a unique form of textual analysis that pays particular attention to its argumentative structure. In this module you will learn and practice philosophical writing. You will learn how to read in preparation for philosophical writing, learn how to plan an essay, learn how to rework your drafts and learn how to use feedback constructively. You will write five drafts and five essays and will have one on one tutorial on each essay you write. The lectures in the course will be split between lectures on the art of writing and lectures on philosophical topics in the domain of fact and value. Essay topics will be based on the topical lectures and their associated readings.

Group B modules

Death. 10 Credits.

This module is mainly about death itself (whereas ‘Matters of Life and Death’ is mainly about killing).  What is death?  What happens to us when we die?  Could there be an afterlife?  Would it be a good thing if there were?  What is it about death that we dislike so much, or that makes it bad?  Is it rational, or even possible, to fear death?  What is the right attitude towards our own death?  Do we have moral duties towards the dead?  The course will clarify these questions and attempt to answer them.  Readings will be taken from both historical and contemporary sources.

Film and Philosophy. 10 Credits.

This module introduces central themes in philosophy through the medium of films. Many films have clear philosophical themes and resonance, and we would choose a selection to cover a range of philosophical topics. For example: free will (The Matrix), death (The Seventh Seal), mind (Her), time travel (Back to the Future), technology (I, Robot), hope (The Road), evil (The Dark Knight). (The exact films shown will change from year to year.)

History of Ethics. 10 Credits.

This module offers a critical introduction to the history of ethical thought in the West, examining some of the key ideas of Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Bentham, Mill, Nietzsche, Rawls and Gilligan.  It thus provides a textual introduction to some of the main types of ethical theory:  the ethics of flourishing and virtue; deontology; utiliarianism; contractualism.  The close interconnections between ethics and other branches of philosophy (e.g. metaphyiscs, epistemology, aesthetics) will be highlighted, as will the connections between ethics and other disciplines (e.g. psychology, anthropology).

Matters of Life and Death. 20 Credits.

What is so bad about death? Is life always as good? Is it always wrong for someone to take their own life? Would it be wrong to help someone to die painlessly who was already dying of a painful illness? Is abortion ever, or always, morally permissible? Do animals have rights which we infringe by killing them or making them suffer? What, if anything, do we owe to the starving of the world? This course is designed to encourage students to think carefully and constructively about range of life-and-death moral dilemmas, developing skills of analysis and critical reasoning. Topics discussed are likely to include: death; suicide; euthanasia; abortion; animals; and famine relief.

Philosophy of Religion. 10 Credits.

This course will pose and try to answer philosophical questions about religion.  These include questions about the nature of religion, and whether religious faith compatible with adherence to the scientific method.  Other questions that the course will cover include questions about the theistic notion of God, such as does the idea of an all-powerful being make sense?   Further questions concern God and morality.  Is it true that if there is no God, then there is no right and wrong?  The course will examine philosophical arguments for the existence of God, and question whether these arguments are sound.

Philosophy of Sex. 10 Credits.

Sex is one of the most basic human motivators, of fundamental importance in many people’s lives, and a topic of enormous moral, religious, and political contention.  No surprise, then, that it turns out to be of great philosophical interest.  We will discuss moral issues related to sex— asking when we might be right to judge a particular sex act to be morally problematic; and what political significance (if any) sex has. We will also discuss metaphysical issues, such as the surprisingly difficult questions of what exactly sex is and what a sexual orientation is.  Throughout our study, we will draw both on philosophical sources and on up-to-date contemporary information.

Self and Society. 20 credits.

This module is an introduction to some of the central questions in political philosophy. Is democracy the best form of government? What is a just society? Does justice require the redistribution of wealth from rich to poor in order to create a more equal – or even socialist - society? Or does the realisation of an egalitarian society require unjust interference with individual freedom and property rights? Do states have the right to impose whichever immigration controls they choose? Should states pay reparations for wrongs – such as colonialism – committed in the distant past? We will think about some of the different answers to these questions and try to work out which answers are the most plausible.

For your remaining credits, you can choose from the selection above, or you can choose modules from other departments. 


You will take 120 credits in total during your second year. Single honours students typically take at least 100 credits in Philosophy, while most dual honours students typically take 60.

All second year Philosophy modules are 20 credits. Here is a typical list of options. Click on the module titles to read a description.

Ethics

This module will consider fundamental questions in ethics through focusing on Kant’s Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals. We will consider the text in some detail, and discuss the questions it raises. For example, does it make sense to think that ethics has one ‘supreme principle’, and does Kant succeed in identifying it? Is the best moral agent the one who acts from duty, rather than from inclination? We will compare Kant’s approach to other options, including utilitarianism and virtue theory.

Feminism

This module introduces students to central issues in feminist philosophy.  A key theme running through the module will be the way that issues not traditionally considered to be political turn out to be political when we consider them through a feminist lens.  This module will involve much more engagement with applied contemporary issues than most philosophy modules, and students on it will learn how to write essays integrating more theoretical with contemporary factual content. Please note that this module can be taken at either Level 2 or Level 3, but not both.

Formal logic

The course will start by introducing some logical concepts, proving some fundamental results concerning set theory along the way. We will then explore propositional logic in some depth, proving 'soundness' and 'completeness' theorems for the use of trees for propositional logic. Following on from that, we will examine first-order logic. It will also show how we may prove a range of fundamental results about the use of trees within those logics, using certain ways of assigning meanings to the sentences of the languages which those logics employ.

Metaphysics

The course will focus on metaphysical themes of perennial interest such as parts and wholes, the nature of people, and the passage of time. Readings will be drawn mainly from recent and contemporary sources. This module can be taken at either Level 2 or Level 3, but not both.

Philosophy of Education

This course has two major components: (1) a theoretical exploration of some of the philosophical issues surrounding school education; and (2) a more practical element focusing on how philosophy can be taught in secondary schools. Students will thus be required to plan and deliver lessons to secondary school pupils during a three-day conference after the end of the examination period. The assessment will weigh the two components equally. The theoretical exploration will be taught in a similar way to other philosophy modules through a weekly lecture and seminar, with a coursework essay to assess this component. The practical element will be taught through workshops, observations at a secondary school, and experience of running seminars with Y10 pupils at the University.

Philosophy of Mind

This module provides a survey of philosophical theories of the mind. One of the reasons why mental phenomena have been particularly interesting to philosophers is that they seem so unlike anything else there is in the world. Unlike gravity, or oxidation, or cell division, there is something that it is like to think and perceive, and thoughts and experiences have content or are about things outside of the individual having those thoughts. Are experiences and thoughts simply neurological states and processes? If not, what else could they be?

Philosophy of Science

What is science? What are the criteria that demarcate science from non-science? For example, what is the difference between science and religion? Second, how does science work? What are the methods and explanatory strategies that make it so successful? Is there such a thing as the scientific method, and what counts as a scientific explanation? Third, is science objective? That is, is science a form of rational and unbiased inquiry, or does it reflect ethical, political, and social factors? Finally, is science the fundamental source of knowledge about the world? Does science tell us how things really are?

Philosophy of the Arts

This module introduces students to a broad range of issues in the philosophy of art. The first half asks ‘What is art?’. It examines three approaches: expression theories, institutional accounts, and the cluster account. This is followed by two critiques focusing on the lack of women in the canon and problems surrounding ‘primitive’ art. The evolutionary approach to art is discussed, and two borderline cases: craft and pornography. The second half examines four issues: cultural appropriation of art, pictorial representation, aesthetic experience and the everyday, and the supposed link between artistic creativity and madness.

Plato

The philosopher and mathematician A N Whitehead once characterised western thought as a "series of footnotes to Plato". The thought of Plato and his teacher Socrates, who both lived in Greece around 400 years before the start of the Christian era, set the agenda for much subsequent philosophy and did much to define out ideas of what philosophy is. This course will introduce students to the study of the philosophy of Plato through a close and critical study of one or more of his dialogues in English translation.

Political Philosophy

We are citizens in a democratic capitalist society, we vote and choose our representatives and our government, our representatives make laws that we must then follow. We do not obey the laws only for fear of being punished; we believe that our system of government is just, and that it is just for us to obey the laws. We believe that – by and large – we live in a just society. Do we? What justifies our system of government? Are there alternative forms of government, alternative ways of organizing a society? Is ours the only just one? We will look at the history of political philosophy and explore various systems of citizenship, government and economic arrangements.

The Empiricists

This module will provide an introduction to the key ideas of the principal early-modern empiricists: Locke, Berkeley and Hume. We will consider what makes their positions distinctive, and whether they should indeed be grouped together as a ‘school’. We will primarily focus on their contributions to epistemology and metaphysics, and thus consider what it really means to be ‘an empiricist’, and how this contrasts to ‘rationalism’.

Reference and Truth

This module is an introductory course in the Philosophy of Language. The overall focus of the course will be on the notion of meaning. Different ways of trying to shed light on this crucial notion will be considered, for example by focusing on the way that names work, and also linguistic conventions. Finally, we will consider the way that the meaning of many/most expressions is vague, asking how to understand and deal with this vagueness and how to answer the associated paradox of the heap.

Religion and the Good Life

What, if anything, does religion have to do with a well-lived life? For example, does living well require obeying God’s commands? Does it require atheism? Are the possibilities for a good life enhanced or only diminished if there is a God, or if Karma is true? Does living well take distinctive virtues like faith, mindfulness, or humility as these have been understood within religious traditions? In this module, we will examine recent philosophical work on questions like these while engaging with a variety of religions, such as Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Daoism, Islam, and Judaism.

Theory of Knowledge

The aim of the course is to provide an introduction to philosophical issues surrounding the knowledge. We will be concerned with the nature and extent of knowledge. How must a believer be related to the world in order to know that something is the case? Can knowledge be analysed in terms of more basic notions? Must our beliefs be structured in a certain way if they are to be knowledge? In considering these questions we will look at various sceptical arguments that suggest that the extent of knowledge is much less than we suppose. And we will look at the four various faculties of knowledge: perception, memory, introspection, and testimony.

Philosophy and Revolution

This course will look at the intense philosophical debate that followed the upheaval of the French Revolution. The main texts studied will be Edmund Burke’s Reflection on the Revolution in France attacking the Revolution and Thomas Paine’s reply defending it, The Rights of Man. Burke and Paine will be the main texts studied, but we may also look at the writings of other such as William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft, Joseph de Maistre, and Benjamin Constant and Germaine de Staël. This module can be taken at either Level 2 or Level 3, but not both.


You will take 120 credits in total during your third year. Single honours students typically take at least 100 credits in Philosophy, while most dual honours students take 60.

All third year Philosophy modules are 20 credits. Here is a typical list of options. Click on the module titles to read a description.

Advanced logic

This module will build upon Level 2 Formal Logic. It will examine some philosophically important areas of formal logic, and it will also consider some philosophical debates concerning foundational aspects of logic.

Aristotle

This module will consider Aristotle’s Ethics, one of the key texts of Western philosophy, and still influential on philosophical thinking today. Through close engagement with the work, it will reveal the central arguments in Aristotle’s thinking.

Classical Chinese Philosophy

This module will consider the philosophical ideas to be found in classical Chinese thought from the pre-Qin Dynasty, including Confucius. It will put the ideas in historical and intellectual context, and consider how they should best be understood.

Feminism

This module introduces students to central issues in feminist philosophy.  A key theme running through the module will be the way that issues not traditionally considered to be political turn out to be political when we consider them through a feminist lens.  This module will involve much more engagement with applied contemporary issues than most philosophy modules, and students on it will learn how to write essays integrating more theoretical with contemporary factual content. Please note that this module can be taken at either Level 2 or Level 3, but not both.

For the Love of Knowledge: Topics in Analytic and Social Epistemology

This module explores the social dimension of knowledge. For example, we often depend on others to know things, and some knowledge is collective not just individual, while failure to recognise someone as a knower can be a matter of injustice. 

Free Will and Religion

This module focuses on philosophical questions about the relationship between free will and religion. Historically, theistic religions have been dogged by questions concerning the nature of human agency, for instance on account of the traditional conception of God as omniscient and hence as having full foreknowledge. The module will examine philosophical conceptions of the relationship between religious states of affairs and positions regarding the status of human action, by considering relevant historical developments within theology and philosophy.

Gender and Religion

This module will examine constructions of gender and sexuality in diverse religious traditions from different cultures around the world. The module will apply feminist theory, gender critical perspectives and queer theory in the close reading of religious traditions. The module features case studies of different religious traditions, including examples of Christianity, Judaism and Islam, in different global contexts, as well as traditions which are less represented in our current religion curriculum, such as Buddhism, and Hinduism, or Chinese and Japanese cultural traditions.

Global justice

What are the demands of justice at the global level? In this course we will start by looking at debates about the nature of global justice, such as that concerning whether there exist any principles of egalitarian justice with global scope. We will then turn to various questions of justice that arise at the global level, potentially including: how jurisdiction over territory might be justified; whether states have a right to exclude would-be immigrants; how to understand the wrong of colonialism; whether reparations are owed for past international injustices; and how to identify responsibilities for combating global injustice.

Hegel and the Phenomenology of Spirit

This module will focus on Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit, one of the major works of nineteenth century German philosophy, which has influenced a range of subsequent philosophers, from Marx to Sartre. The course sets out to clarify the key ideas and arguments that Hegel is aiming to defend.

Metaphysics

The course will focus on metaphysical themes of perennial interest such as parts and wholes, the nature of people, and the passage of time. Readings will be drawn mainly from recent and contemporary sources. Please note that this module can be taken at either Level 2 or Level 3, but not both

Moral theory and moral psychology

The aim of this module is to examine the relationship between moral theory and moral psychology. It will discuss the nature of self-interest, altruism, the will, and moral intuitions, and psychological arguments for and against various moral theories.

Pain, Pleasure and Emotions

Affective states have a profound bearing on the quality of our lives. Chronic pain can be disabling while insensitivity to pain can be fatal; a life without pleasure looks like a life of boredom, but excessive pleasure seeking can disrupt decision-making. In the last decades, philosophers and cognitive scientists have made fascinating discoveries about pain, pleasure and emotions. In this module, we explore these recent advances. These are some of the problems that we will discuss; why does pain feel bad? Are emotions cognitive states? What is the relation between pleasure and happiness? Are moral judgements based on emotions?

Phenomenology

A text-based introduction to the work of thinkers within the Phenomenological Movement, such as Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone De Beauvoir, and Frantz Fanon. We will consider what makes their contribution so distinctive, and how they have shaped subsequent philosophical discussion, particularly on issues such as freedom, choice, embodiment, experience and race.

Philosophical Projects (1 and 2)

These are optional dissertation-like modules. Each semester a variety of topics are set. For each topic, a short list of key readings is provided, and students supplement these with at least two other pieces of relevant literature. Then, having agreed an essay plan and title with the tutor assigned to them for the module, they write an extended essay that identifies the central issue (or issues) under discussion, relates the various responses to that issue found in the literature, evaluates those contributions, and goes some way to identifying a satisfactory resolution of the issue. Recent topics have included:

  • Philosophy of Race
  • Conversation
  • Philosophy of Science
  • Evil and Death
  • Languages and Worlds
  • Trust
  • Nietzsche and morality
  • The imagination
  • Sartre and Bad Faith
Philosophical Problems (1 and 2)

Philosophical Problems 1 and 2 offer new cutting-edge topics each year, offered by senior PhD students in the department. Topics in recent years have included: 

  • Perception, Experience and Agency
  • Contemporary Debates in Biology: Sex, Gender, Sexuality & Race
  • I, You, We: Topics in Social Ontology
  • Meaning of Life
Philosophy of Law

Law is a pervasive feature of modern societies and exerts claims over more or less all areas of our lives. But what is law? Is it simply a method of social control? Does law have authority on the basis of which its claims over us are justified? Is there a duty to obey the law? Are there principled limits to the reach of law into e.g. our private lives? How does law relate to individual rights? What is the relationship between law and democracy? This course will look at fundamental questions such as these about the nature and justification of law. It may also look at particular areas of law, such as constitutional, tort or criminal law, and at critiques of law.

Philosophy and Revolution

This course will look at the intense philosophical debate that followed the upheaval of the French Revolution. The main texts studied will be Edmund Burke’s Reflection on the Revolution in France attacking the Revolution and Thomas Paine’s reply defending it, The Rights of Man. Burke and Paine will be the main texts studied, but we may also look at the writings of other such as William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft, Joseph de Maistre, and Benjamin Constant and Germaine de Staël. Please note that this module can be taken at either Level 2 or Level 3, but not both.

Philosophy of Psychology

This course provides an in depth look at a selection of issues in contemporary philosophy of psychology. Philosophy of psychology is concerned with such questions as: What is the structure and organisation of the human mind? What is the cognitive basis for such capacities as our capacity for language, rationality, science, mathematics, cultural artefacts, altruism, cooperation, war, morality, and art? To what extent are the concepts, rules, biases, and cognitive processes that we possess universal features of all human beings and to what extent are they culturally (or otherwise) variable? To what extent are these capacities learned as opposed to innately given? How important is evolutionary theory to the study of the mind? What is consciousness? What can philosophy of psychology tell us about other areas of philosophy? This course will discuss a selection of these and related issues by looking at the work of philosophers, psychologists, and others working within the cognitive sciences more generally.

Plato's Symposium

The Symposium is a vivid, funny and moving dramatic dialogue in which a wide variety of characters – orators, doctor, comic poet, tragic poet, soldier-cum-statesman, philosopher and others – give widely differing accounts of the nature of erotic love (erôs) at a banquet. We will be exploring the origins, definition, aims, objects and effects of erôs, and asking whether it is viewed as a predominantly beneficial or harmful force. Are some manifestations of erôs better than others? Is re-channelling either possible or desirable, and if so, how and in what contexts? What happens to erôs if it is consummated? We will in addition explore the issues that the dialogue raises about relations between philosophy and literature, and the influence it has had on Western thought (e.g. Freud).

The Political Philosophy of Climate Change

Why is climate change a problem of global justice and how could the international community address this problem fairly? In this course we will look at various questions of justice that climate change raises and examine how political philosophers have attempted to answer them. Topics to be considered may include: historical responsibility for climate change, duties regarding future generations, the problem of allocating the burdens of addressing climate change, natural resource justice, the rights of indigenous peoples, moral issues concerning territorial loss or displacement, and the politics of geoengineering the planet.

The Radical Demand in Løgstrup's Ethics

In this module we will consider the key work of the Danish philosopher and theologian K. E. Løgstrup (1905-1981): The Ethical Demand (1956). In this book, Løgstrup characterized the ethical relation between individuals as involving a ‘radical demand’ for care, involving important commitments about the nature of life, value, and human interdependency. We will compare his ideas to related themes in Kant, Kierkegaard, Levinas, and contemporary care ethics.

The Sources of Normativity

Normative concepts play central roles in many aspects of our lives. But what are the sources of normativity? This module will examine the foundations of normativity, paying particular attention to the very important ‘constructivist’ approach associated with Christine Korsgaard. 

Workplace Learning

This module involves a work placement of 35-70 hours with a local organisation (voluntary or commercial sector). You will experience first-hand the practical challenges and problems facing the organisation. You will learn about the organisation's overall aims, and the various methods and strategies employed to accomplish those aims. You will draw on the concepts and theoretical frameworks studied in your other philosophy modules to identify a philosophical issue relevant to the organisation’s work or goals, and to write a piece or pieces of coursework addressing that issue; or you will be able to use the skills and knowledge you have gained in your other philosophy modules to analyse a problem of philosophical interest faced by the organisation or encountered in the course of your employment. You will have two meetings together with other students in the module to discuss your work placement and formulate ideas for your written coursework. You will have a further individual meeting with the module convenor or an appropriate supervisor from the Department of Philosophy to discuss the progression of the coursework. At the end of the module, you should have:

  • The ability to apply ideas from your other philosophy modules in rigorously assessing the challenges facing organisations like the one you worked for, and interrogating potential solutions to them
  • Insight into the practical application of theoretical issues in philosophy
  • Practical experience that will make you a strong candidate for jobs in the sector you worked in.

The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it is up-to-date and relevant. Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research, funding changes, professional accreditation requirements, student or employer feedback, outcomes of reviews, and variations in staff or student numbers. In the event of any change we'll consult and inform students in good time and take reasonable steps to minimise disruption.

Information last updated: 16 September 2020


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