KE Research Sabbatical Case Study

Project title - "Measuring health outcomes using TELER"

This Research Sabbatical funding gave me an invaluable opportunity to manage a small project and work in depth with Longhand to identify a shared vision for the future.

dr katherine easton

 

Project partners

Dr Katherine Easton

Centre for Assistive Technology and Connected Healthcare (CATCH)

Professor Sue Mawson

School for Health and Related Research (ScHARR)

Longhand Data Ltd


Overview

New tools are helping health care to focus on patient-measured outcomes. One such tool is TELER, a measuring system developed over 30 years that uses statistical analysis and algorithms to evaluate people’s health. Its 1,400 indicators can be used to monitor and track treatment outcomes as well as chronic conditions.

To make a step change in the technology’s development, TELER owners Longhand Data Ltd strengthened a partnership with the University with a KE Industrial Research Sabbatical. This scheme develops new relationships, enables knowledge exchange and stimulates collaborative activity. Through it, Dr Easton worked with the York-based SME to give ScHARR an understanding of the technology, its development for new clinical areas and its integration into clinical practice.

Activities

During the six-month sabbatical, Dr Easton became a part-time member of the team at Longhand and an expert in TELER, its principles and its applications. She compared measurement tools in mental health and explored how TELER could be applied in this field, leading to the forthcoming publication of three papers.

But the collaboration’s impact has reached much further than the two sabbatical partners. Because of her focus on TELER, Dr Easton has formed partnerships elsewhere in the University, as well as with clinicians in the NHS and researchers at King’s College London. Work continues to contribute to TELER’s commercial development and ideas arising from the project will affect future students and create new research networks.

Next Steps

To promote TELER research, ScHARR will be including the system in a masters module on complex evaluation methods. The team are also exploring funding options for a PhD project. Another significant output from the sabbatical has been new connections with other researchers nationally. The team hope these can generate grant income, publications and a scientific community network of the senior academics involved in using TELER.

Dr Easton is clear about the benefits of the sabbatical: “More and more, funders want productive collaborations with industry partners. This Research Sabbatical funding gave me an invaluable opportunity to manage a small project and work in depth with Longhand to identify a shared vision for the future.”