Course details

A Levels ABB Other entry requirements
UCAS code QR31
Duration 4 years
Fee Look up fee
Related subjects English Literature French

Any questions?

Undergraduate admissions team
School of English
Telephone +44 (0) 114 222 0236

School of English

1st for research environment
Research Excellence Framework 2014

Course description

As a dual honours student you'll take half your modules in the School of English and half in the Department of French. The many optional modules mean you can design your degree around your individual interests.

Both French and English language literary cultures (including theatre, film and creative writing) are plural, mutable, and endlessly fascinating. Furthermore they have been in constant dialogue, and of course occasionally contest, for centuries.

There have been revolutions both political and aesthetic, and the shockwaves on one side of the channel were soon felt on the other (or indeed throughout the colonial histories of these former empires). Combining your studies in French and English will allow you to trace the correspondences and clarify the differences between these neighbouring cultures, and to develop a deep-rooted internationalism that acknowledges the necessity not to think only of France and England, but the competing engagements of these languages and cultures on colonial and post-colonial territories, including the vivid cultural life of America.

The dual or combined honours degrees also allow you to study for a year in a French speaking country. Studying for a dual degree with a modern language is a great way to distinguish yourself in the eyes of employers, and to open up whole new possibilities for your future life, close to home or further afield.

Modules: what you study and when

About dual honours and major/minor degrees

Financial help from the University - bursaries

If you're a UK student, you could be entitled to a University bursary. A bursary is the same as a grant - you don't have to pay it back.

How our bursary scheme works

Entry requirements

Qualification Grades
A Levels ABB typically including a modern foreign language and typically including English Literature, English Language & Literature, or English Language*
A Levels + Extended Project Qualification BBB typically including a modern foreign language and typically including English Literature, English Language & Literature, or English Language* + B. The Extended Project should be in a relevant subject
International Baccalaureate 33, typically with 6 in Higher Level modern foreign language
BTEC DDD in a relevant subject with 16 units at Distinction + typically an appropriate modern foreign language qualification and typically including English Literature, English Language & Literature, or English Language*
Cambridge Pre-U D3 M2 M2 typically including a modern foreign language and typically including English Literature, English Language & Literature, or English Language
Scottish Highers + 2 Advanced Highers AABBB+AB typically including a modern foreign language and typically including English Literature, English Language & Literature, or English Language
Welsh Baccalaureate + 2 A Levels B+AB typically including a modern foreign language and typically including English Literature, English Language & Literature, or English Language
Access to HE Entry requirements for mature students
Other qualifications Other UK qualifications
Other EU/international qualifications
Other requirements
  • *Applicants not presenting English Language, English Literature or English Language & Literature may still be considered where relevant interest and experience in the literary arts (including film or media) can be demonstrated. If you are not studying a modern foreign language, the department will consider other evidence of aptitude for language learning (such as a languages GCSE or, for non-native speakers of English, an English language qualification)
  • International students need an overall IELTS grade of 7.0 with a minimum of 6.5 in each component, or an equivalent English language qualification
  • Equivalent English language qualifications
If you have any questions about entry requirements, please contact the department

Modules - what you study and when

The modules listed below are examples from the last academic year. There may be some changes before you start your course. For the very latest module information, check with the department direct.

School of English website

Course information on French Studies website

First year

Core modules:

Studying Poetry
Studying Prose

Optional modules:

Celtic Languages and Literatures: an Introduction
Critical Contexts: Interpreting Literature
Darwin, Marx, Freud
Early American Literature
Early Englishes
Foundations in Literary Study: Biblical and Classical Sources in English Literature
History of English
Hollywood Cinema
Introduction to Cinema
Introduction to Creative Writing
Practical Stylistics
Studying Theatre: A History of Dramatic Texts in Performance
French Beginners I
French Beginners II
French Critical Contexts I
French Critical Contexts II
Language and Communication Skills I
Language and Communication Skills II
Understanding Modern France I
Understanding Modern France II

Second year

Optional modules:

Adaptation: Theory and Practice
America in the 1960s
Creative Writing Poetry 2
Criticism and Literary Theory
Good Books: Intertextual Approaches to Literature and the Bible
Introduction to Luxembourgish Language and Culture
Introduction to Middle English
Introduction to Modern Irish
Introduction to Old English
Literary Mad Scientists: From Frankenstein to Einstein
Love and Death: The Films of Woody Allen
Modern American Fiction
Post-War British Realist Cinema
Radical Theory
Renaissance Literature
Representing the Holocaust
Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature
Secrets and Lies:Victorian Life-Writing
Storying Sheffield
The History of Persuasion
The Postcolonial Bildungsroman
Writing the Real
"Par où commencer?" Séminaire d'analyse et d'interprétation du texte littéraire I
"Par où commencer?" Séminaire d'analyse et diinterprétation du texte littéraire II
Des Gaulois à de Gaulle: histoire pratique du français
French Intermediate I
French Intermediate II
L'Exclusion Sociale en France I
L'Exclusion Sociale en France II
La Bande Dessinee I
La Bande Dessinee II
La Francophonie: Langue, Colonie et Civilisation I
La Francophonie: Langue, Colonie et Civilisation II
Language and Communication Skills III
Language and Communication Skills IV
Minorités et Identités dans la France du XXe siècle I
Minorités et Identités dans la France du XXe siècle II
The World of French Words
Translation in Theoretical Context I
Translation in Theoretical Context II
Understanding Modern France I (Beginners' Pathway)
Understanding Modern France II (Beginners' Pathway)
Writing the Revolution I
Writing the Revolution II

Third year

Core modules:

French Year Abroad
French Year Abroad
SLC Year Abroad
SLC Year Abroad

Fourth year

Core modules:

Language and Communication Skills V
Language and Communication Skills VI

Optional modules:

Advanced Luxembourgish Language and Culture
Afro-American Literature 1: Beginnings to the Harlem Renaissance
America and the Avant-Garde, 1950's-1990's
Byron and Shelley
Contemporary Literature
Creative Writing Poetry 3
Fin de siècle Gothic
Identity/ Crisis: Trauma, Narrative, Self
Modern Literature
No Animals were Harmed in the Making of this Module: Animals in Film
Other Theatres
Project Module
Romantic and Victorian Poetry
Romantic and Victorian Prose
Sappho's Granddaughters: Poetry by Women 1789-1901
Sex and Decadence in Restoration Theatre
Social Approaches to Multilingualism
The Brontës
The Idea of America
The Man Who Knew Too Much: Hitchcock's Films
War on Screen
Women Playwrights on the International Stage: 1880s-1930s
Writing Fiction
Film Studies I
Film Studies II
Gender, Society and Economy in France I
Gender, Society and Economy in France II
Le Rire Gaulois I
Le Rire Gaulois II
Le Siècle des Lumières I
Le Siècle des Lumières II
Literature and Politics of the 'Post(-)colonial' I
Literature and Politics of the 'Post-Colonial' I
Litterature Et Democratie I
Litterature Et Democratie II
Realities and Falsehoods: The French Occupation in Literature and Film I
Realities and Falsehoods: The French Occupation in Literature and Film II

The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it's up-to-date and relevant. Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research; funding changes; professional accreditation requirements; student or employer feedback; outcomes of reviews; and variations in staff or student numbers.

In the event of any change we'll consult and inform students in good time and take reasonable steps to minimise disruption.

Learning and assessment

These figures give an indication of how you'll learn and be assessed. They're a combined average of all the years of the two single honours courses on which this dual degree is based. The learning and assessment percentages could vary depending on the modules you choose.

Scheduled teaching 13%
Independent study 87%
Placement 0%

Exams/tests 16%
Coursework 70%
Practical 14%

School of English

Jessop West

We are a research intensive department with an international perspective on English studies across four distinct degree programmes. Students can specialise in their chosen degree, whilst also taking modules from different programmes, forging interdisciplinary connections about the ways in which humans use language.

Our staff are researchers, critics, and writers. They're also passionate, dedicated teachers who work tirelessly to ensure their students are inspired. We keep seminar groups small because we believe that's the best way to stimulate discussion and debate. Our modules draw on a range of innovative assessments and can include designing websites, writing blog posts, and working with publishing software, in addition to writing essays and delivering presentations. We are committed to providing our students with the pastoral support they need in order to thrive in their degree. All students are assigned a personal tutor with whom they have regular meetings. You are welcome to see any of the academic staff in our regular office hours, if there's anything you want to ask.

School of English website

French Studies

Our courses focus on developing your spoken and written French to a native or near-native standard. You'll also, through the study of French culture and society, acquire detailed knowledge and core critical skills. Options include film studies, bande dessinée, social exclusion, modern French thought, contemporary theatre and the visual arts.

Our teaching is informed by world-leading research in French art, literature, history, society, film and theatre. You'll have opportunities to get involved in our diverse projects and special events - including an annual play, book group, research seminars and talks from invited speakers.

Our courses are distinctive and cutting-edge. There are traditional lectures and you'll participate in seminars, workshops and research projects. We teach English and French. Our language classes are kept small to ensure all students' needs are met.

French Studies website

What our graduates do

Our graduates are confident and articulate. They have highly developed communication skills, preparing them for a wide range of career paths, from information technology, to media and public relations, to marketing and advertising. Many of our students go on to postgraduate study, research, and an academic career.

Student profile

"I've always been pretty interested in language innovation and language use, and the degree can be related to the outside world. So we focus on, say, how texting and social media affect language."

Lewis Clarke

"I have career aspirations to become a lecturer so I knew that being a department that was full of people who do research as half of their job would be the best place to be."

Matthew Nicholl

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Undergraduate admissions team
School of English
Telephone +44 (0) 114 222 0236

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