Course details

A Levels ABB Other entry requirements
UCAS code RV45
Duration 4 years
Fee Look up fee
Related subjects Spanish Hispanic Studies Philosophy

Any questions?

Admissions Secretary
Department of Philosophy
Telephone +44 (0)114 222 0587
Email philosophy@sheffield.ac.uk
Website sheffield.ac.uk/philosophy/prospectiveugs

Department of Philosophy

94% agree that the course is intellectually stimulating
National Student Survey 2016

Course description

Half your modules will be in philosophy, the other half in Hispanic studies. About a third of teaching time is devoted to improving your written and spoken Spanish, supported by small-group sessions and classes with native speakers, every week.

You'll spend a year in Spain or Latin America, as a teaching assistant or studying at a university. We try to find you a placement that fits with your interests. We have a lot of success placing students with language teaching schemes run by the British Council.

The philosophy side of the degree is flexible. There are no compulsory modules. You can develop your understanding of key areas such as ethics, philosophy of mind, theory of knowledge, political philosophy, metaphysics and logic. We also teach courses on major figures in the history of philosophy such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes and Hegel.

Hispanic studies covers Iberian and Latin American Spanish, Portuguese and Catalan. Level one gives you a grounding in the language, culture, history and society of Spain and Latin America. Levels two and three give you the chance to explore aspects of those cultures, including film, music, linguistics, literature, art and sport.

Language learning is compulsory throughout the course but there are lots of optional modules to choose from in both subjects. You can shape your own degree and set your own challenges.

Modules: what you study and when

About dual honours and major/minor degrees

Financial help from the University - bursaries

If you're a UK student, you could be entitled to a University bursary. A bursary is the same as a grant - you don't have to pay it back.

How our bursary scheme works

Entry requirements

Qualification Grades
A Levels ABB typically including a modern foreign language*
A Levels + Extended Project Qualification BBB typically including a modern foreign language* + B. The Extended Project should be in a relevant subject.
International Baccalaureate 33, typically with 6 in Higher Level in a modern foreign language*
BTEC DDD + typically an appropriate modern foreign language qualification*
Cambridge Pre-U D3 M2 M2 typically including a modern foreign language*
Scottish Highers + 1 Advanced Higher AABBB+B typically including a modern foreign language*
Welsh Baccalaureate + 2 A Levels B+AB typically including a modern foreign language*
Access to HE Entry requirements for mature students
Other qualifications Other UK qualifications
Other EU/international qualifications
Other requirements
  • *If you are not studying a modern foreign language, the department will consider other evidence of aptitude for language learning (such as a languages GCSE or, for non-native speakers of English, an English language qualification).
  • International students need an overall IELTS grade of 6.5 with a minimum of 6.0 in each component, or an equivalent English language qualification
  • Equivalent English language qualifications
If you have any questions about entry requirements, please contact the department

Modules - what you study and when

Our students usually select from a range of compulsory and optional modules to add up to 120 credits.

Some departments offer courses that don't feature optional modules whereas other courses are fully flexible.

You can find out more by:

The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it's up-to-date and relevant. Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research; funding changes; professional accreditation requirements; student or employer feedback; outcomes of reviews; and variations in staff or student numbers.

In the event of any change we'll consult and inform students in good time and take reasonable steps to minimise disruption.

Learning and assessment

These figures give an indication of how you'll learn and be assessed. They're a combined average of all the years of the two single honours courses on which this dual degree is based. The learning and assessment percentages could vary depending on the modules you choose.

Learning
Scheduled teaching 16%
Independent study 71%
Placement 13%

Assessment
Exams/tests 46%
Coursework 38%
Practical 16%

Department of Philosophy

We pride ourselves on our research-led teaching; our staff are among the best in the world at what they do. They're active researchers so your lectures and seminars are informed, relevant and exciting. We'll teach you how to think carefully, analytically and creatively.

The department is a community. We share a belief that our subject is relevant, even vital, to people outside the university. We run sessions on careers, so you're clear how your degree can make you an asset to an employer. Through projects like Philosophy in the City, you'll use what you learn to make a difference in the community.

And we look after each other. You'll get a personal adviser, a member of staff to guide you through your time here. You also have the option of a Philosophy Mentor, a second or third year student to support you during your first year.

Department of Philosophy website

Department of Hispanic Studies

Jessop West building

Learn with us and you won't just become fluent in Spanish. You'll be immersed in Hispanic cultures. Our degrees are about understanding the contexts that determine the way Hispanic communities think and act. This knowledge can be key to the success of many national and international enterprises.

You'll be stretched intellectually, learning in small groups with native speakers. Around a third of teaching time is devoted to developing your written and oral fluency in Spanish. And there's a huge range of options for combining Hispanic Studies with a second subject.

You'll build a close working relationship with your tutors. We use novel ways to inspire you, including filmmaking. Our student-run societies arrange regular social, cultural and sporting events. We also perform a Spanish or Latin American play and a Hispanic concert each year, in which staff and students participate.

Visits by contemporary Spanish and Latin American writers, film directors and scholars play their part in maintaining a lively intellectual environment. We also hold regular research seminars that are open to all, in which both members of the department and invited speakers present the areas in which they research.

Department of Hispanic Studies website


What our graduates do

Studying philosophy will develop your ability to analyse and state a case clearly, evaluate arguments and be precise in your thinking. These skills will put you in a strong position when it comes to finding employment or going on to further study.

Our graduates work in teaching, law, social work, computing, the civil service, journalism, paid charity work, business, insurance and accountancy. Many also go on to study philosophy at postgraduate level.

Student profile


"Sheffield's fantastic because the lectures are really friendly and they're all really approachable, and there are loads of different ways to get involved apart from your lectures.""

Emma Shephard
Philosophy



"I'm in love with Sheffield, it was definitely a good choice. Studying languages means I can pretty much go anywhere, meet people and have a conversation. It has opened up another world."

Samantha O'nion
Languages

Apply for this course

Make sure you've done everything you need to do before you apply:

How to apply >

When you're ready to apply, see the UCAS website:

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Contact us

Admissions Secretary
Department of Philosophy
Telephone +44 (0)114 222 0587
Email philosophy@sheffield.ac.uk

Department website >

Visit us

University open days
There are four open days every year, usually in June, July, September and October. You can talk to staff and students, tour the campus and see inside the accommodation.

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Department open days
If we offer you a place on a course, you'll be invited to a department open day. Philosophy open days are usually held between January and March.

Campus tours
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