Dr Fuschia Sirois

PhD, BSc

Department of Psychology

Director of Recruitment

Reader

f.sirois@sheffield.ac.uk
+44 114 222 6552

Full contact details

Dr Fuschia Sirois
Department of Psychology
Floor G
Cathedral Court
1 Vicar Lane
Sheffield
S1 2LT
Qualifications
  • 2003: PhD Social/Health Psychology (Carleton University)
  • 1998: MA Social/Health Psychology (Carleton University)
  • 1996: BA (Hons) Psychology (University of Ottawa)
  • 1995: BSc (Hons) Biochemistry/Nutrition (University of Ottawa)
Research interests

At the broadest level, my research interests fall under the umbrella of health and well-being. More specifically, I am interested in understanding the psychological factors and qualities that may confer risk or resilience for physical health and well-being related outcomes through their links to self-regulation, emotions, and temporal orientations.

The outcomes I study range from stress and health behaviours, to physical illness symptoms, chronic illness, and the treatment-related behaviours people engage in to manage their physical health.

My work draws upon several theoretical perspectives to address these issues including classic social cognition models of health behavior change, and my own recently developed Self-regulation resource model which links affective states to temporal orientations for understanding when and why people may be more or less effective at regulating their behavior.

Procrastination and perfectionism as risk factors for health and well-being

My research on personality as a risk factor has focused primarily on two related traits, procrastination and perfectionism, and their potential roles in compromising health and well-being. Over the past 19 years my research has systematically investigated the health-related consequences of chronic procrastination.

This research has focused on testing and extending the procrastination-health model (Sirois, 2007; Sirois, et al., 2003) to better understand the perils of procrastination for health.

My research in this area has focused on understanding the role of emotions in procrastination, as well as how poor emotion regulation makes this trait a vulnerability factor for poor adjustment to, and management of, chronic conditions such as hypertension and heart disease.

More recently my research has included a focus on understanding how a related trait, perfectionism, is linked to health outcomes, such as health-promoting behaviours and adjustment to chronic health conditions.

Self-compassion and gratitude as resilience factors

Mounting evidence supports the benefits of self-compassion and gratitude for well-being. But what about for physical health?

Research understanding how these resilience related qualities may also be of benefit in physical health contexts is extremely limited.

My current research has sought to address this gap by examining the role self-compassion and gratitude for enhancing physical health related outcomes such as engaging in health-promoting behaviours and adjusting to stressful chronic health conditions such as arthritis, fibromyalgia, and inflammatory bowel disease.

Role of time perspective and temporal self-perceptions in health and well-being

A common thread in my research focuses on understanding how different temporal views can create risk or resilience for health and well-being through their connections to self-regulation.

I am particularly interested in the dynamic interplay of affective states and temporal orientations for replenishing or depleting self-regulation capacities as outlined by my Self-regulation resource model (Sirois, 2015a, 2015b, 2015c)

I am also interested in temporal self-continuity and how the relationship to the future self is implicated in the regulation of present emotional states and behaviours as they relate to health outcomes.

Psychological Factors in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Use

For over 14 years I have applied psychological theory to understanding decision-making and treatment response in the context of using CAM.

This research, which initially started with investigating the motivations for initial and continued use of CAM (Sirois & Gick, 2002), has evolved into a research program focused on understanding how people become committed to including CAM as part of their health-care repertoire and the role of personality and self-perceptions in CAM treatment decisions and outcomes.

Publications

Show: Featured publications All publications

Books

  • Taylor SE & Sirois FM (2014) Health Psychology. McGraw-Hill Ryerson. RIS download Bibtex download
  • Taylor SE & Sirois FM (2012) Health Psychology. McGraw-Hill Ryerson. RIS download Bibtex download
  • Taylor SE & Sirois FM (2008) Health Psychology. RIS download Bibtex download

Edited books

  • Sirois F & Pychyl T (Ed.) (2016) Procrastination, Health, and Well-Being. Academic Press. RIS download Bibtex download
  • Sirois F & Molnar DS (Ed.) (2015) Perfectionism, Health, and Well-being. Switzerland: Springer. RIS download Bibtex download

Journal articles

Chapters

All publications

Books

  • Taylor SE & Sirois FM (2014) Health Psychology. McGraw-Hill Ryerson. RIS download Bibtex download
  • Taylor SE & Sirois FM (2012) Health Psychology. McGraw-Hill Ryerson. RIS download Bibtex download
  • Taylor SE & Sirois FM (2008) Health Psychology. RIS download Bibtex download

Edited books

  • Sirois F & Pychyl T (Ed.) (2016) Procrastination, Health, and Well-Being. Academic Press. RIS download Bibtex download
  • Sirois F & Molnar DS (Ed.) (2015) Perfectionism, Health, and Well-being. Switzerland: Springer. RIS download Bibtex download

Journal articles

Chapters

Conference proceedings papers

  • Wang Y & Sirois F (2016) Drawn to the light: Loneliness predicts a preference for products in brightness but not darkness. Advances in Consumer Research, Vol. 44 (pp 670-672) RIS download Bibtex download
  • Shucard H & Sirois F (2015) They have NO idea what it's like to live with IBD" The influence of other people's perceptions on coping with inflammatory bowel disease. QUALITY OF LIFE RESEARCH, Vol. 24 (pp 152-152) RIS download Bibtex download
Research group

Current postgraduate students

  • Associate Editor of BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, and BMC Public Health
  • Member of the Editorial Board of the European Journal of Integrative Medicine
  • Former Tier II Canada Research Chair in Health and Well-Being (2011-2015)
  • Member of the Editorial Board of the Anxiety, Stress, & Coping
Grants

Key research funding

  • Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). Mask, L. & Sirois, F. M. Looking out the window or looking in the mirror?: The role of social and temporal comparisons in middle­aged women’s body image evaluations and attitudes toward aging. 2015-2017. $60,071 CDN.
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). Levasseur, M., Larivière, N., Filiatrault, J., Provencher, V., Couturier, Y., Sirois, F. M., Corriveau, H., & Champoux, N. Lifestyle Redesign: une intervention ergothérapique pour optimiser la santé et le mieux-être des aînés. 2014-2015. $99,496 CDN.
  • Massage Therapy Research Fund of the College of Massage Therapists of Ontario Sirois, F. M., Drumheller, A., Lebrun, A., & Cloutier, H. The effects of massage therapy on the anxiety and sleep quality of individuals with fibromyalgia: A pilot study. 2013-2015. $17,850 CDN
  • Bishop’s University Senate Research Committee. Sirois, F. M. Embracing the Future Self: An Investigation of Procrastination, Empathy, and Temporal Self-Regulation. 2014-2015. $8,500 CDN
  • Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). Sirois, F. M. How is procrastination bad for your health? Situational and dispositional perspectives on the role of stress and health behaviours. 2005-2009. $101,143 CDN
Teaching activities

Currently I am the departmental Coordinator of Teaching.

I lecture in:

  • PSY103 (Psychology at Sheffield)
  • PSY110 (Essential Social Psychology)
  • PSY246 (Social, Health and Environmental Psychology)
  • Tutor for PSY259
Professional activities

Recent media coverage

Many of the topics I research are popular with the media and accordingly, my research has been featured more than 100 times on television, radio, and in various national, and international print and online publications including: