Research Supervisor Details

This page provides additional information about our research supervisors. You can either browser supervisors by department or search for them by keyword. Most supervisors also have a personal webpage where you can find out more about them.

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Dr Jonathan Dickson
j.m.dickson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education
School of Health and Related Research

I am an academic GP.  My special interests are neurology, epilepsy and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.  Major themes in my research are improving emergency care for people after a seizure and the use of free-association narrative interviews to give new insights into psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. All of my research is about health-service quality improvement, my personal methodological expertise is in quantitative methods but I work in multi-disciplinary research teams using mixed methods to develop and test complex interventions. 

I am very happy to receive informal enquiries.  Feel free to get in touch by email.  

My web profile is avaiable via this link:

https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/medicine/research/aupmc/staff/academicprofiles/jmdickson

 

Professor Christopher Deery
c.deery@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

  • Cariology
  • Preventive dentistry, particularly fissure sealants
  • Evidence based dentistry
  • Child-centred dental research

 

My areas of particular research interests are cariology, preventive dentistry, research in primary dental care, evidence based dentistry and child focused research.

Dr Michelle Horspool
m.horspool@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

As well as having an interest and clinical background in substance misuse and mental health (which was the area or work for my PhD), I have experience in designing and delivering complex interventions, as well as the feasibility, design and recruitment to studies within primary care and pharmacy settings. 

Professor Christopher Burton
chris.burton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education
School of Health and Related Research

I am an academic GP with a particular interest in how doctors and patients deal with persistent physical symptoms. My work aims to help doctors explain symptoms constructively. We recognise that symptoms have both peripheral (body) and central (brain) processes and the challenge is to translate developments in science, particularly neuroscience, into explanations which safely make sense of symptoms for patients and lead to better management

I have other interests around diagnosis, testing and reassurance, and healthcare use in relation to both mental and physical ill-health. I use a variety of methods including analysis of large data, development and evaluation of clinical interventions, and technological innovation.

Within the university I lead the Academic Unit of Primary Care, and represent the Academic Unit of Medical Education on faculty research committees. I am a member of the Centre for Urgent Care Research within ScHARR.

Dr Caroline Mitchell
c.mitchell@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education

I am a General Practitioner and Senior Clinical Lecturer;  Deputy Academic Training Programme Director NIHR Sheffield Clinical Academic Training programme; Research training and Capacity Building Lead on the ‘PRIME’ NIHR RCUK Global Health Project 

I have research interests in the overlap of physical and mental health problems and health inequity in access to primary care of high risk, underserved populations. I have methodological expertise in health service qualitative and quantitative study design and analysis including the development and evaluation of complex interventions in primary care; recruiting for clinical studies in high risk deprived and/or socially excluded populations.

Current and recent projects:

EDIT: Early Diagnosis Intervention and Treatment of long-term conditions (respiratory disease, T2 Diabetes Mellitus, Cancer) in high-risk populations.  For example postnatal interventions for women with gestational diabetes, primary care interventions to improve respiratory health of high risk populations , for examples: people who use substances; people living with HIV;  people living with severe mental illness  

Co-investigator,  PhD and Clinical Academic Trainee supervisor on the ‘PRIME’ NIHR Global Health Research Group on PReterm bIrth prevention and manageMEnt (PRIME) https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/news/nr/ptb-grant-reduce-child-death-1.794251. Our LMIC/ UK partnership includes partners in Bangladesh, South Africa and Nigeria. I work as a senior clinical academic within the evidence synthesis, clinical (intervention development, health service delivery)  and social science qualitative research teams  

Postgraduate supervision:

Clinical Academic Trainees; NIHR In practice training fellows; ACF and ACL; Masters; PhD students (multidisciplinary) 

Mrs Sally Underwood
s.underwood@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Nursing and Midwifery
Health Sciences School
Dr Andrew Lee
andrew.lee@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My main research interests are in the field of health protection-related topics such as disaster response and emergency planning, and the control of communicable diseases/infectious diseases. I am also interested in topics in international health, primary care as well as health service management.  Examples of my previous research and consultancy activities include

  • evidence review of the public health benefits of urban greenspace
  • study of the drivers of smoking in young people in Pakistan
  • study on beneficiary perspectives of humanitarian aid in Sri Lanka after the Asian Tsunami disaster
  • NIHR-funded study scoping the evidence base for emergency planning in health in the UK
  • NIHR-funded study examining the international evidence base for demand management interventions of referrals from primary to secondary care
  • evaluation of a telehealth intervention for patients with long term conditions 
  • developing evidence-based disaster management practice in the UK and Nepal,
  • investigating barriers to testing and treatment of Hepatitis B in the migrant Chinese ethnic population in the UK,
  • evaluation of the WHO in-country presence,
  • evidence review of interventions for malnutrition in emergencies,
  • studying the determinants of testing for latent TB infection in South Asians in the UK.

My current ongoing research projects (as of February 2017) are:  

  • developing a series of health research projects on slum health in Nepal,
  • evidence review of public health needs following earthquakes.
Professor Alicia O'Cathain
a.ocathain@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

Mixed methods, evaluation of new health services, patient views of health care, urgent care.

Mr Paul Shepley
p.shepley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interest

Dr Shepley's primary research interest lies in physical modelling of construction processes.

Professor Elizabeth Wood
e.a.wood@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Liz's research focuses mainly on early childhood and primary education, with specific interests in play and pedagogy; curriculum and assessment in ECE; teachers’ professionalism and professional knowledge; policy analysis and critique.

Dr Clare Gardiner
c.gardiner@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Nursing and Midwifery
Health Sciences School

My research interests are in palliative and end of life care, in particular the role of the family caregiver, palliative care in hospitals, care of older people at the end of life, and health economic approaches to palliative care. My methodological expertise lies mainly in qualitative, mixed methods research and evidence synthesis

Dr Diane Burns
d.burns@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School
Research interests
  • Health & Social Care at home and in institutions
  • Care recipent's and care worker's perspectives and knowledge 
  • Financialisation of social care, business models and managment
  • Social innovation in home care provision - a Wellcome Trust funded project 2017-18.
  • Diane's Department of Health and Comic Relief funded project examined organizational cultures in care homes for older people and positive experiences of care. This study was conducted with colleagues at the University of East Anglia, University of Stirling, University of Worcester and Cardiff University.
  • Recently Diane was involved in a two and half year, Department of Health and Comic Relief funded participatory project with care home residents and family carers to examine the organisational dynamics of abuse and respectful care of older people in care homes.

Diane’s research examines organizational arrangements, cultures and change in health and social care systems with two sub themes – organizational failure and institutional abuse in care homes; and social innovation in home care provision.

Diane is interested in supervising qualitative research in health and social care systems and organization; job quality, care workforce and labour arrangments; care quality, abuse and mistreatment in organized care; voice, power and whistle-blowing in the workplace and other organizations; collaborative forms of organizing and partnership. 

Diane is particularly interested in action research, participatory appraoches and co-production, and the development of organizational ethnography using visual methods, poetics and film.

Dr Emma Knowles
e.l.knowles@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research interests are emergency and urgent health care systems, new roles/services within emergency and urgent health care, violence directed towards staff in the Emergency Department.

Dr Janet Harris
janet.harris@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • community-based participatory approaches to improving health care services, with a particular focus on health inequalities.
  • social constructions of health and illness in the context of access to health care and employment policy
  • effectiveness of different approaches to teaching and learning in terms of promoting work-based skills and evidence based practice
  • mixed methods evaluation research
  • realist evaluation and realist synthesis
Dr Lorna Warren
l.warren@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests

Much of my early research centred on social care for older people, though it also extended to other aspects of community and health care services and their impact on the lives of service users and carers. More recently, I have focussed on issues of representation in later life, looking at the construction and framing of ageing and care-giving. I draw from a mix of anthropological, social policy, sociological, social gerontological, and feminist perspectives and approaches and the intersection of gender and age has been a key focus of my work. My interests include social and cultural dimensions of ageing, intergenerational relations and informal or family care relationships, which I have explored predominantly through qualitative methods, including interviews, focus groups, observation (participant and non-participant), ethnography, life stories and more recently visual approaches. I recognise the importance of `user involvement´ and interdisciplinarity in research and am committed, in particular, to the development of participatory research, raising questions about how we come to know what we know about the lives of people who use services and the connection of this knowledge with policy and practice.

I have recently completed 2 major research projects:

The social process of everyday decision-making by people with dementia and their spouses, an ESRC-funded study carried out with Dr Geraldine Boyle (PI) which aimed to explore and raise awareness of the decision-making abilities of people with dementia. 

Representing Self – Representing Ageing,  part of the cross disciplinary New Dynamics of Ageing Programme: http://www.newdynamics.group.shef.ac.uk/ and which I carried out, as PI, with Professors Merryn Gott and Susan Hogan. Known more familiarly by the title of Look at Me! Images of Women and Ageing, the project worked with women in Sheffield to explore representations of women and ageing in the media and to produce new images to challenge existing stereotypes: http://www.representing-ageing.com/. I won an ESRC Outstanding Impact in Society Award for the project in 2014 and am continuing to extend the project's impact through activities including intergenerational work in schools.

My other research activities have included:

The ESRC Older Women’s Lives and Voices project, exploring issues affecting the quality of life of older women across different ethnic groups within Sheffield and their involvement in services available to them:

The European Commission funded MERI project (Mapping Existing Research and Identifying Knowledge Gaps Concerning the Situation of Older Women in Europe), a collaborative project involving 13 EC countries and designed to contribute to the development of European studies and policy to improve older women’s lives.

Postgraduate Supervision

I have supervised 9 students to successful completion at PhD (x 8) and MPhil (x 1) levels. I am currently primary supervisor of 1 full-time and 5 part-time PhD students, including a joint location student (Trinidad and Tobago). I welcome applications to study full-time or part-time with me for MPhil or PhD research degrees that are related to my activities and experience. I would be particularly interested in hearing from students who wish to undertake participatory research with older people and carers.

 

Professor Stephen Goodacre
S.Goodacre@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research interests are clinical trials in emergency medicine, economic analysis, the organisation of emergency care and methods for evaluating the quality of emergency care.

Dr Jane McKeown
j.mckeown@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Nursing and Midwifery
Health Sciences School

My research interests are the care and involvement of people who have dementia and I am interested in research methods that enable people’s ‘voices to be heard’.

Professor Susan Yeandle
s.yeandle@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

My research, publications and teaching have focused on the relationship between work and care in contemporary societies, and on how people manage caring roles and responsibilities throughout the life course.

I specialise in research with the potential for policy and practical impact, and have expertise in making complex research findings accessible to a wide range of audiences, wide experience of research design and methods, and extensive knowledge of policy on care, carers and employment.

I currently supervise PhD students studying the work of carers’ organisations (Jenny Read) and the provision of home care in Shanghai (Wenjing Jin), and welcome enquiries from prospective PhD students wishing to study topics in my specialist field.

Dr Rachel O'Hara
r.ohara@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • Patient safety
  • Human factors in healthcare
  • Safety culture

I am interested in supervising research students in topics/areas such as Patient Safety, Organisational Culture and Safety Culture in Healthcare.

Professor Zoe Marshman
z.marshman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My main interest is child-centred dental research to increase understanding of the impact of oral health and dental care on children and young people. My work involves inclusive research with children with the aim of informing policy and clinical practice.

I co-ordinate the Children and Young People Oral Health Research Group, a multidisciplinary team conducting research with children using a range of research methods

Professor Jonathan Nicholl
J.Nicholl@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research interests are in Health Services and Public Health research.  My main field of research is the evaluation of emergency and urgent first contact care and services, particularly A and E services, including trauma services and chest pain care; ambulance services including helicopter ambulances; and urgent first contact care services including telephone and out-of-hours services.  I also carry out methodological research related to the design of health service evaluations, and I have a particular interest in the use of routine (e-health) data for HSR.

Professor Jeremy Dawson
J.F.Dawson@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

Jeremy's research falls broadly into three areas, with plenty of crossover between them – management of health care organisations, team working, and statistics. Recent projects in health care include a study of the effects of NHS staff engagement and experience on patient outcomes; various studies of team working in health care, particularly in mental health services; an examination of the effects of organisational restructuring in the NHS; and a project looking at the diversity of hospital staff and their representativeness of the local community. In 2014 he begins an NIHR-funded study evaluating Schwartz Center Rounds® in the NHS.

As well as teams in health care, he has a more general interest in team diversity, and in particular how it should be measured. As a statistician he has also undertaken a wide range of methodological research, particularly regarding interpretation of interaction effects, measurement of diversity, analysis of incomplete team data, and the effects of aggregation on relationships. He has published over 30 papers in refereed academic journals in the fields of psychology, management, health care and research methods, as well as numerous project reports and articles in practitioner publications. He is an editorial board member of five journals, and an Associate Editor of the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology.

Dr Jennifer Burr
j.a.burr@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of interest:

  • Sociology of health and illness

Research methods I am able to supervise:

  • Qualitative

Specific areas of interest:

  • Reproductive technology
  • Research ethics
  • Gender and sexuality
Professor Mark Hawley
mark.hawley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • Assistive Technology
  • Telecare & telehealth
  • Digital Healthcare
Professor Kate Morris
kate.morris@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Kate’s areas of interest are: family minded policy and practice, family participation in care and protection, the reform of safeguarding practice and child welfare inequalities. She is passionate about social work and the role of social work in supporting change. 

Kate supervises PhD students in the areas of family caring relationships, family interventions and family support. Kate is Co-Director of the Family Potential Research collaboration http://www.familypotential.org.

Professor Christopher McDermott
c.j.mcdermott@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Neuroscience
The Medical School

Research interests

The main drive of Prof McDermott’s research programme is developing the evidence base for delivering supportive and symptomatic care for patients living with motor neuron disease. He is also interested in studying mechanisms of neurodegeneration, in order to develop treatments for patients with motor neuron disease and hereditary spastic paraplegia.

Offering PhD opportunities in the following areas:

  • Investigating and delivering optimal respiratory support for patients with MND
  • Establishing an evidence base for nutritional support in MND
  • Designing and evaluating assistive technologies for patients with neuromuscular weakness
  • Developing and evaluating novel service delivery mechanisms for patients with long term neurological conditions
  • Genetic and phenotypic characterisation of motor system disorders
  • Natural history study of motor system disorders
  • Collaborating with pharmaceutical companies in Phase 1-3 studies
  • Improving symptomatic management for patients with MND
  • Epidemiology of motor neuron disease
Dr Majella Kilkey
m.kilkey@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests / Areas of Supervision

International migration

Intra-EU mobility

Transnational families

Migration and care

British emigration

Citizenship

Fathering

 

Mr Robert Akparibo
R.Akparibo@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of research interest:

  • International Health planning and management
  • Nutrition
  • Maternal and child health
  • Primary health care

 

Methods I am able to supervise:

  • Qualitative
  • Quantitative
  • Mixed Methods

 

Specific areas of interest:

  • Health literacy
  • Undernutrition
  • Infant and young child nutrition/feeding
  • Micronutrients
  • Evaluation of interventions on any area regarding nutrition
  • Maternal and child health
  • Primary health care in developing countries
  • Health planning and management
Dr Sarah Barnes
s.barnes@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My primary research interest is in 'improving the quality of life of older people'. Key research areas arising from this are:-

  • The impact of the physical environment on the quality of life of older people
  • Evaluating the housing needs of older people
  • Assessing the palliative care needs of older people with life-limiting illnesses
  • Improving communication between patients with life-limiting conditions and their health care professionals
  • Improving hospital environments for the end of life care of older people
Dr Katy Cooper
k.l.cooper@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research interests include:

• Systematic reviews of clinical effectiveness for healthcare interventions
• Development of methods for systematic reviewing and evidence synthesis, including rapid review methods
• Systematic reviews of complex interventions 
• Patient safety and quality of care
• Complementary and alternative medicine research

Dr Ines Henriques Cadby
i.henriquescadby@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My current research focuses on hospital performance and the quality of care offered to patients based on the analysis of large routine observational datasets.

My work in pure mathematics has focused on commutative and homological algebra, with connections to representation theory, algebraic geometry and singularity theory. 

Miss Clara Mukuria
c.mukuria@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My research interests are:

  • Development and testing of preference-based health measures in different populations
  • Mapping between condition-specific and generic preference-based measures of health
  • Use of well-being measures in health and social care
Methods I can supervise:
  • Quantitative
  • Mixed methods
Mr Robin Sen
r.n.sen@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Sociological Studies

All of my research interests are in some way connected to child and family social work. I currently supervise PhD students in the areas of child protection, family support and out of home care. I would be particularly happy to hear from applicants interested in pursuing research around:

  • Child protection
  • Critical approaches to evidence based practice
  • Digital media in relation to social work practice and 'vulnerable' children and families
  • Family Support
  • Out of home care

I would also be happy to consider applications focussing on other areas of social work / the helping professions which are connected to any of the interests set out above.

Professor Angela Tod
a.tod@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Nursing and Midwifery
Health Sciences School

My research interests lie mainly in care for adults and older people. My particular research focus is in patient experience studies, especially in areas of public health, health inequalities and health care access. Recent studies have included qualitative research in older patient populations, for example lung cancer, mesothelioma, neutropeanic sepsis and Parkinson's. I have also led a programme of work on fuel poverty, cold homes and health. I have a current interest in patient experience of  health services as well as evaluations of new clinical nursing roles.

Methodologically my expertise lies in qualitative research, in stand-alone and mixed method studies.

I currently jointly lead a 5 year Strategic Research Alliance between the RCN and School of Nursing and Midwifery.

I am the theme lead for the Translating Knowledge into Action Theme of the Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) Yorkshire and Humber.

I have a good record of completion for Doctoral student supervision.

Dr Steven Ariss
S.Ariss@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

Methods:


• Realist (and other ‘theory led’) Evaluations of Programmes and Complex Interventions 
• Conversion Analysis & Ethnomethodology
• Mixed and Qualitative Research Methods

Topics of Interest:

• Health Service Organisation and Delivery
• Interdisciplinary Team-Working
• Organisational change management
• Implementation and knowledge transfer
• Use of technology in healthcare (for service development and evaluation)
• Health Care Interactions and Relationships
• Self-Management of Chronic and Long-Term Conditions
• Older People's Community Health Services

Professor Elizabeth Goyder
e.goyder@sheffield.ac.uk

School of Health and Related Research

Research topics in the field of developing and implementing evidence-based public health including: health inequalities, access to health care, physical activity interventions, type 2 diabetes and diabetes prevention.

Research methods include mixed methods evaluations of public health and complex interventions and evidence synthesis/ systematic reviews of public health and complex interventions.

Dr Sheila Kennedy
S.M.Kennedy@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My main research interests are in qualitative research and public and patient involvement in research especially relating to the health and social care of people with long term and or life limiting illnesses, development and evaluation of services, support for carers, especially older carers, and the care experiences and outcomes for ‘looked after children’. I am experienced in using qualitative data analysis software programmes.

Professor Fiona Lecky
f.e.lecky@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

Fiona’s research interests include: Traumatic Brain Injury, Major Trauma, Biomarkers in Emergency Care and Injury Epidemiology. Latterly she has been Chair of the College of Emergency Medicine Research Committee – successfully setting up PhD studentships for Trainee Emergency Physicians, and the NW EM Walport Programme lead with a competitive ACF programme.
Recent publications include those looking at trends in trauma outcome and clinical effectiveness in trauma care and venour thromboembolism with a particular focus on head injury.

Professor Albert Ong
a.ong@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

I lead the Kidney Genetics Group at the University of Sheffield. Its major research interests are in the molecular genetics, cell biology and pathogenesis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In particular, we aim to discover new treatments for ADPKD, to understand better how cysts form and grow in the ADPKD kidney and to improve the clinical management of ADPKD patients.

ADPKD is one of the most common monogenic human diseases known and affects around 1 in 500 people. It is caused by mutations in two genes, PKD1 and PKD2. ADPKD accounts for ~10% of patients with kidney failure in most renal units and affects up to 10 million people worldwide. It is also a major cause of sudden death and disability in younger patients due to intracranial aneurysm rupture.

Dr Susan Baxter
S.K.Baxter@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of research interest:

  • Health services delivery
  • Methodologies of systematic reviewing

Research methods I can supervise:

  • Qualitative
  • Qualitative evidence synthesis
  • Systematic reviews
  • Theory-based reviews
  • Logic models

Specific areas of interest:

  • Interprofessional and team working in healthcare
  • Integrated health and social care systems and services
  • Evaluation of services and interventions
  • Patient experiences of healthcare
  • Professional practice
  • Communication systems and patient safety
  • Use of logic models in evidence synthesis
  • Methods to improve the presentation of evidence to stakeholders
  • Allied health professional services
Professor James Chilcott
j.b.chilcott@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

* Modelling in public health

* Modelling in cancer and cancer screening

* Methodological modelling interests including:

  • the modelling process and errors in HTA models
  • cognitive mapping for systematic reviews in complex settings
  • structural uncertainty in models
  • Bayesian analysis of joint disease natural history and test characteristics in screening
  • value of information methods
  • probabilistic sensitivity analysis methods
  • meta modelling
  • information gathering processes for models
Dr Emily Wood
e.f.wood@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Areas of interest:
Mental Health
Spiritual Care
Health Services research
Mixed methods research
 
Methods:
Qualitative
Mixed Methods
Systematic Review
Single Case experimental design
 
Specific interests:
Treatment for long term depression
Mental health and physical health
Spirituality and mental health
Pain and depression
EMDR
Public mental health 
Global mental health
Developing complex interventions for mental health conditions

Dr Michaela Rogers
m.rogers@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Primarily I am a qualitative researcher with an interest in narrative but I have experience of managing mixed methods projects too. I am interested in all things that concern equality and social justice in relation to my practice discipline of social work and social care, but my main research interests and research lie in the following areas:

  • interpersonal and gender-based violence (including intimate partner violence, elder abuse, domestic homicide, child abuse, and other forms of family violence);
  • gender, trans and gender diversity;
  • hidden voices and marginalised communities;
  • narrative methods.

I am also interested in, and would welcome applications, concerning:

  • Identity and belonging;
  • A sociology of family, family practices and identity;
  • Hate crime;
  • Stalking and harassment;
  • Digital methods, abuse, stalking and harassment;
Mr Matthew Franklin
matt.franklin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My current interests are in the use of routinely collected care data for the purpose of costing analysis, economic analysis and decision modelling. I also have an interest in the capability-approach and extra-wefarism and its conceptual and practical application to economic evaluations and decision making, and the conceptual and practical use of outcome measures in general.

I can supervise students interested in the use of large databases of rountinely collected care data for health economic analysis and decision modelling problems. These databases include, but are not limited to:

  • Secondary Uses Service (SUS)
  • Hospital Episode Statistics (HES)
  • Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD)
  • ResearchOne
The aforementioned are some of the more commonly used databases, but I have experience using rountinely collected care data from primary, secondary, intermediate, mental health, ambulance and social care services. 
 
I can also supervise students interested in the conceptual and practical basis of using outcome measures for the purpose of economic evaluation; this includes those students interested in the extra-welfarist approach to welfare economics in relation to the market for health and healthcare.
 
I have more specific interests in research focussed on frail older people, dementia, cognitive impairement and more generalised mental health conditions.

 

Dr Phil Shackley
p.shackley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • Developing and applying the contingent valuation methodology, in particular the technique of willingness to pay. Applications include: estimating the social value of a quality adjusted life year (QALY); using willingness to pay values to aid priority setting in publicly-financed health care systems; investigating how willingness to pay can and should be used alongside randomised trials; the use of willingness to pay to evaluate the benefits of public health interventions such as the fluoridation of drinking water supplies and the supplementation of flour with folic acid; evaluating minimally invasive surgery; assessing patient preferences for diagnostic radiology; and assessing preferences for an expanded newborn screening programme.
  • The identification, measurement and valuation of (dis)benefits that are not captured in the QALY approach. Applications include: assessing the value of patient health cards; eliciting patient preferences for out-of-hours primary care services; establishing and quantifying the preferences of mental health service users for day hospital care; eliciting patient preferences for the organisation of vascular services; and assessing preferences for access to a general practitioner.
  • The application of economic evaluation techniques to assess the efficiency of health care programmes and interventions. Applications include: screening in primary care; antenatal screening; management of lower respiratory tract infection in general practice; computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for anxiety and depression; methods for assessing patients with intermittent claudication; drug treatments for epilepsy; stroke incidence and prevention in Tanzania; venous leg ulcers; and treating upper limb spasticity due to stroke with botulinum toxin.
Dr Malcolm Patterson
m.patterson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

PhD Supervision

I am currently supervising PhD students in the following areas:

  • destructive leadership
  • emotions, moods and innovative work behaviour
  • knowledge sharing
  • organisational interventions to enhance employee engagement
  • start-up journeys of entrepreneurs
  • participative action research interventions to improve quality of patient care

I would welcome applications and inquiries in these areas and related areas corresponding to my areas of expertise listed above.

Publications

Knight, C;, Patterson, M.G, Dawson, J and Brown, J (2017). Building and sustaining work engagements- a participatory action intervention to increase work engagement in nursing staff. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 26(5) 634-649.

Knight, C;, Patterson, M. and Dawson, J. (2017). Building work engagement: A systematic review and meta-analysis investigating the effectiveness of work engagement interventions. Journal of Organizational Behavior Education, 38(6) 792-812.

Madrid, H.P. and Patterson, M.. Creativity at work as a joint function between openness to experience, need for cognition and organisational fairness. Learning and Individual Differences, forthcoming 2016.

Stephan, U., Patterson, M., Kelly, C. and Mair, J. (2016). Organizations driving positive social change: A reveiw and an intergrative framework of change processes. Journal of Management, 42(5) 2016.

Madrid, H., Patterson, M. and Leiva, P. (2015). Negative core affect and employee silence: How differences in activation, cognitive rumination and problem-solving demands matter. Journal of Applied Psychology, 100(6) 1887-1989.

Madrid, H.P., Patterson, M.G., Birdi, K.S. and Leiva, P.I. (2014). The role of weekly high-activated positive mood, context, and personality in innovative work behavior: A multilevel and interactional model. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 35(2) 234-256.

Full list of publications

 

Dr Ryan Byerly
t.r.byerly@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Philosophy

His primary research interests are in Philosophy of Religion, Epistemology, and Virtue Ethics.

Professor Suzanne Mason
s.mason@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research interests relate to the evaluation of complex interventions and systems in emergency care settings. I have extensive experience in multi-centre mixed methods studies which can directly inform the delivery of high quality emergency care to patients.

Ms Annette Haywood
a.haywood@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

I am a qualitative researcher and my research interests include older adults, health inequalities and the integration of health and social care.

Professor Jane Seymour
jane.seymour@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Nursing and Midwifery
Health Sciences School

I am a nurse by background and have worked in palliative and end-of-life care research and education since the early 1990s. My own PhD was a study of end of life decision-making in intensive care units. I have long standing interests in the palliative care needs of frail older people and how we can meet them, at a clinical level and health systems level. I also have interests in advance care planning, other aspects of end of life decision-making and public education in palliative and end of life care. I have publised and presented widely on these topics. I have research links in Europe and beyond.

I have supervised and examined PhD students from the UK and overseas (including Malawi, Uganda, Cameroon, India and the Middle East). I encourage students to undertake projects related to palliative care that fit with their own interests and prepares them to be leaders in palliative care nursing research in their own countries/ contexts.

My methodological expertise lies in qualitative and mixed methods research, with special interests in case study and ethnographic methods.

Dr Sharron Hinchliff
s.hinchliff@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Nursing and Midwifery
Health Sciences School

Research Interests

My research spans the areas of ageing, gender and sexual/reproductive health, as well as the psychology of health and health care. Methodologically, my expertise lies in qualitative research, vulnerable groups and sensitive topics.

Mr Mike Bradburn
m.bradburn@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

Mr primary interest is the implementation of Good Clinical Practice into NHS/academic funded clinical trials. My main areas of methodological interest are meta-analysis and survival analysis.

Professor Mahdi Mahfouf
m.mahfouf@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Research interests:

Intelligent Systems Based Signal Processing, Modelling and Control in Biomedicine

  • Neural-Fuzzy Modelling and Decision Support in Respiratory Intensive Care Units (ICU) and Cardiac Intensive Care Units (CICU).
  • Signal Processing and Physiological Modelling for Operational Functional State (OFS) Identification in Humans: Investigations into Man-Machine Interactions.
  • Model-Based Predictive Control of Anaesthesia.
  • Fuzzy and Neural-Fuzzy Classification, Modelling and Control of Anaesthesia.

A Systems Engineering Approach to Modelling and Optimisation for Metal Processing

Professor Wendy Baird
w.o.baird@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

Research interest focuses on inequalities in health and access to health services for both those with chronic disabling diseases and those who are socially excluded from care.

• Health inequalities 
• Health Services Research and Technology Assessment.
• Public and patient involvement in research

Dr Hannah Jordan
h.c.jordan@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

I am interested in the measurement, impact and understanding of variations in geographical access to health service; in the influence of the built and spatial environment on health behaviours and outcomes, the use of and access to health services; and in barriers to self-care and self-management in older people.

Professor Ravindra Maheswaran
r.maheswaran@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My main research interest concerns the application of geographical information systems and science (GIS) to public health research and practice. Research fields within this area include (i) geographical and environmental epidemiology; (ii) geographical variations in health and health care; and (iii) methodology for spatial studies.

Professor Tony Ryan
t.ryan@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Nursing and Midwifery
Health Sciences School

Research interests

I undertake research and teaching activities in the field of long-term conditions and ageing. Specifically I work in the fields of dementia care and family caregiving. In particular I am keen to continue these activities in the context of applied, translational research.

Dr Maxine Johnson
m.johnson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research interests include the organisation of health care delivery. In particular, I have been involved in qualitative evaluations of health care from the patient and provider perspective. I have a particular interest in the prevention and self-management of obesity and chronic illness.

More recently I have been involved in synthesising evidence for public health guidance for NICE. In this role I am interested in the development of methods which involve identifying and assessing of a variety of study types in order to provide reviews of evidence that address current public health issues.

Dr Jon Burchell
J.Burchell@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Jon's primary research interests focus upon issues of corporate social responsibility, sustainable development and business ethics. He is particularly interested in the interactions between businesses and third sector organisations. In addition, he is involved in the school's commitment to the United Nations Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME).

Dr Vanessa Halliday
vanessa.halliday@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My primary research interest focusses on nutrition and dietetics, in particular the prevention and treatment of undernutrition in vulnerable population groups.  I have experience of using quantitative approaches, including the development of health measurement scales, as well as qualitative research.

Professor Patricia Lawford
p.lawford@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

My main activity is in the area of cardiovascular biomechanics and in cardiovascular implant devices. My key interest is the development and use of computational models for the study of cardiovascular disease and its treatment. My primary aim is the translation of modelling tools to clinical workflows and the use of predictive modelling in treatment planning.

Professor David Strutt
d.strutt@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Biomedical Science

Research Interests

Cell polarisation is a fundamental process in the development of complex multicellular organisms. We are interested in how such polarisation is coordinated and maintained during development, with a primary interest in the roles of the Frizzled sevenpass transmembrane receptor.

Read more (link to the Centre for Developmental and Biomedical Genetics)

Professor Glenn Waller
G.Waller@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Psychology

Research interests

My primary interests lie in the following areas:
• Cognitive content and processes that underlie and maintain the eating disorders
• The treatment of the eating disorders, with a particular focus on cognitive-behavioural approaches
• The translation of evidence-based approaches into real-life clinical settings, and the clinician variables that enhance or impede that process

Dr Parveen Ali
parveen.ali@sheffield.ac.uk

Nursing and Midwifery
Health Sciences School

I am a mixed method researcher and equally use qualitative as well as quantitative methods.  I am interested in exploring gender based violence, especially intimate partner violence from the perspective of victims and perpetrators.  I am also interested in exploring health, consanguinity and genetics, and inequalities in health care experiences and health outcomes and how the reparation and training of health professionals such as doctors, nurses and allied health professionals can contribute to tackling such inequalities.

Dr Andrew Chantry
a.d.chantry@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism

Research Interests

His principal research interests are anabolic strategies in the treatment of myeloma bone disease and novel strategies to target myeloma tumour. He also has holistic research interests including life with cancer – holistic care and quality of life studies, computational modeling of cancer including using digital simulations and game technology.

Professor Nicolas Martin
n.martin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Synthesis and application of nano-particulate materials for dental applications.

The application of nucleating agents for the remineralisation of dentine

Integrity of structurally compromised restored teeth as compound systems

Optimisation of ceramic crown-tooth compound systems

Development and characterisation of novel restorative systems.

Remote digital communication for the provision of health care in dentistry

Development of L&T in restorative dentistry

Clinical evaluation of restorative systems

Professor Stephen Walters
s.j.walters@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
Dr Kate Weiner
k.weiner@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

I work at the intersection of medical sociology and science and technology studies. My doctoral research looked at lay and professional constructions of familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), a treatable hereditary condition associated with heart disease. My analysis focussed on the themes of geneticisation, genetic responsibility and biosociality, three prominent concepts in discussions of the social implications of genetic knowledge. Subsequent research projects looked at more mundane health technologies for cholesterol management, including cholesterol-lowering foods containing plant sterols and prescription and over-the-counter statins. Current research is expanding this work on consumer health technologies, looking at self-monitoring technologies such as blood pressure monitors and weighing scales/BMI monitors. All of these studies consider professional expectations as well as people’s accounts of why and how they adopt and use, or don't use, particular products or technologies. They consider the way responsibilities for health are distributed, the practices involved and the implications for forms of expertise in relation to health care. The work critically engages with notions of 'self-care' and 'health behaviours', proposing alternative lenses such as care infrastructures and practice theory approaches. I have an ongoing interest in developments in the biomedical sciences. Recent work has looked at the routine practices of racialised prescribing.

 Research interests:

  • everyday health practices
  • mundane health technologies
  • self-monitoring, self-tracking, self-care
  • social implications of biomedical developments eg genomics, epigenetics
  • social categories in the clinic
  • qualitative research methods
Dr Paul Armitage
p.armitage@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

My primary research interest is in the development of post-processing methods for quantification of MRI data. In particular, for techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, arterial spin labelling, image registration, MR signal modelling and their application to stroke, brain tumours, epilepsy and small vessel disease. My imaging interests span the entire age range from the foetus through to the ageing population.

Dr Anna Barton
a.j.barton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of English Literature

Research interests

My primary research interests lie in nineteenth-century literature, particularly Victorian poetry, cultural formalism, print culture and nonsense literature.

I have supervised and examined doctoral work on the literature of the long nineteenth century and would welcome PhD applicants who are interested in Victorian poetry, with particular reference to its relationship with aspects of nineteenth-century identity and culture.

Professor Philip Benson
p.benson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My primary research interest is investigating the effectiveness of contemporary orthodontictechniques and practice. I am the principal or co-author on five systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Library and I have planned, coordinated and completed several randomised controlled clinical trials. I am also interested in oral health-related quality of life and in particular developing patient reported outcomes to measure the impact of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment on young peoples’ everyday lives.

Dr Stephen Hincks
s.hincks@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Research interests

My primary research interests focus on three interrelated themes:

Applied spatial analysis and GIS - developing and applying different conceptual, methodological and analytical frameworks to understand complex spatial structures and processes and their impacts on spatial development.

Housing and neighbourhoods - understanding spatial housing markets and their uneven structures and functionalities.

Urban-regional policy and planning - consideration of the policy frameworks and governance architectures that shape urban and regional development.

Dr Aymen Idris
aymen.idris@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research interests

The primary interest of my group is in the area of pharmacology of inflammation induced bone remodelling associated with a variety of bone diseases. The specific aims of our research are to (a) uncover novel druggable signal transduction pathways essential for the regulation of bone - immune - malignant cell interactions, and (b) develop and test new therapeutic agents for the prevention and treatment of skeletal and non-skeletal complications associated with bone disease.

Dr Pamela Lenton
p.lenton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Economics

Research interests

Pamela's research interests lie in the economics of education, labour economics and health. Pamela's primary interest is education economics. More recently Pamela has focused on the areas of household debt and health and the problems faced by the financially excluded. This is joint work with Paul Mosley and a book of the empirical research undertaken in UK cities will be published later this year. Pamela has also just completed an economic analysis of the Psychiatric Morbidity Survey (with Jenny Roberts and John Brazier) which was funded by the National Institute for Health Research.

Dr Gurleen Popli
g.popli@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Economics

Research interests

Gurleen´s primary research interest is in Applied Econometrics. Her research has focused on the effects of economic growth and labour market institutions on the wage structure, distribution of income, and poverty in both the formal and the informal sectors of the economy. An example of a recent project is the effects of free trade on labour market outcomes for women in developing countries. Her current research focuses on the impact of poverty and inequality on early childhood development. Gurleen is interested in supervising students in applied micro- and macro-econometrics.

Dr Peter Stordy
peter.stordy@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Research interests

My research interest focus on:

  • Internet, digital and information literacies, school and HE pedagogy
  • Appreciative Inquiry (AI)
  • Inquiry-based Learning (IBL)
  • Primary education
  • Learning styles
  • Personal Development Planning (PDP)
Research supervision

I am interested in supervising PhDs in:

  • Literacies
  • Education
  • Web Authoring
Professor Tim Vorley
tim.vorley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

My primary research interests are in entrepreneurship, enterprise and regional economies. Other interests are: Intrapreneurship, Multinational Enterprises, Industry Clusters, EU Regional Policy and Governance, Regional Innovation Systems, Industrial Competitiveness, Knowledge Economy; Public Policy Technology Transfer and SMEs. I am always keen to hear from potential PhD candidates in any of these areas.

Dr Meredith Warren
m.j.warren@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield Institute for Interdisciplinary Biblical Studies
Department of English Literature

Meredith Warren's primary research interests lie in the cultural and theological interactions among the religions of the ancient Mediterranean, especially early Judaism and Christianity. Her current research focuses on the sense of taste and heavenly food in ancient Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman narratives. Warren's first book examined the tropes of anthropophagy, sacrifice, and divinity in the Gospel of John and the Ancient Greek novels.

 

Please Note:

Research applicants proposing Dr Meredith Warren as a supervisor should select the Arts and Humanities IPO on the application form.

Dr Meredith Warren
m.j.warren@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of English Literature
Sheffield Institute for Interdisciplinary Biblical Studies

Meredith Warren's primary research interests lie in the cultural and theological interactions among the religions of the ancient Mediterranean, especially early Judaism and Christianity. Her current research focuses on the sense of taste and heavenly food in ancient Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman narratives. Warren's first book examined the tropes of anthropophagy, sacrifice, and divinity in the Gospel of John and the Ancient Greek novels.

 

Please Note:

Research applicants proposing Dr Meredith Warren as a supervisor should select the Arts and Humanities IPO on the application form

Professor Susan White
sue.white@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Sue's primary research interest is in the sociological analysis of professional judgement and decision-making with an emphasis on understanding how science, formal knowledge, rhetoric, moral judgement, emotion and subjectivity interact in professional practice, particularly in child health and welfare. Her research has focused principally on the analysis of professional talk in a range of health and welfare settings. However, she has also undertaken evaluative and applied research for central and local government, NHS and non-statutory organisations.

Dr Peter Cudd
P.Cudd@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research interests include open and closed innovation as topics and across health electronic technology, electronic AT design and evaluation – including intelligent/robotic AT. My particular interests include : simplifying the users experience of sophisticated digital systems – bringing the philosophy of `Use of IT without understanding it´; so called mHealth – use of mobile technologies for any health and social care purposes; the role of patient information within tele-interventions; user centred design methodologies in the health and social care context; patient and public involvement; lay research participants views on research ethics and dementia.

`Use of IT without understanding it´ is practically embodied in an open source Windows™ application called Maavis (Managed access to audio, visual and information services). Currently in collaboration with an external open source developer and the University’s Designer in Residence, an html 5 and Apache licence version is being produced.

My recent short term projects within CATCH have included working on haptic technologies for people with visual impairments, telecare for people with dementia, leisure apps for people with dementia, and telerehabilitation for dysarthria.

Dr Daniel Hammett
D.Hammett@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Geography

Research interests

My research addresses concerns within political and development geography, primarily in relation to sub-Saharan Africa. My work falls into two main themes: geographies of citizenship and belonging, and the geopolitics of sub-Saharan Africa. Within this work I engage with the role of media and ICTs in citizenship, development and representation, as well as identity and nationhood.

Recent and current PhD students have worked on citizenship claims in Mexico, the role of civil society in the Caribbean, pastoral livelihoods in the Horn of Africa, indigenous land rights in Canada, and health care provision in Nigeria.  


Dr Matthew Kurien
m.kurien@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease

My research interests are in small bowel disease and clinical nutrition, with outputs predominantly in coeliac disease and gastrostomy feeding. Other research interests include gastrointestinal bleeding, bile acid diarrhoea and irritable bowel syndrome.

In coeliac disease my work has focused on detection, using differing endoscopic techniques and point of care tests. I am now examining the autoimmune association between Coeliac disease and Type 1 Diabetes, and also investigating the overlap with non-coeliac gluten sensitivity. In gastrostomy feeding, my research has aimed at improving patient selection for this intervention. In 2016, I was awarded the Julie Wallace Award by the Nutrition Society for my contributions to this field.

Professor Alison Loescher
a.loescher@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

In 2003 I initiated a service to manage patients with chronic orofacial pain. The service is now well established and receives referrals from a wide geographic area, including many tertiary referrals. The rarer causes of facial pain are frequently seen within the clinic making it a valuable teaching clinic for both medical and dental higher surgical trainees and dental undergraduate students. In the development of the facial pain service, links have been made with colleagues in neurosurgery, neuromedicine and palliative care. Weekly clinics, held with neurosurgery, review patients with trigeminal neuralgia requiring surgical treatment. This clinical interest in facial pain forms the basis for some of the research projects that are currently being undertaken.

Dr Laura Ferraiuolo
l.ferraiuolo@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Neuroscience

The main research focus of my research group is identifying the role of glia in neurodegenerative conditions, with particular interest in Motor Neurone Disease (MND). Our primary aim is to develop therapeutic strategies using gene therapy approaches.

In MND, like in many other neurodegenerative disorders, neuronal damage and death are the most striking signs of disease, however, our research, along with the work of others, has demonstrated that glia play an active role in neuronal degeneration.

We use various in vitro cell models, including primary cells and genetically reprogrammed human progenitor cells, to investigate the interaction between astrocytes and oligodendrocytes from patients affected by MND with neurons.

The main research tools and techniques used in my laboratory:

  1. Human astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons derived from fibroblasts through genetic reprogramming
  2. Mouse stem cells expressing the green fluorescent protein under the Hb9 promoter, resulting in GFP+ motor neurons
  3. 2D and 3D Co-culture system to study the interaction between glia, neurones and other cell types
  4. Viral constructs to target specific therapeutic candidates for gene therapy approaches
  5. Gene expression profiling
  6. High-throughput drug screening
Dr Amanda Crawley Jackson
a.j.jackson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

French Studies
School of Languages and Cultures

Research interests

Post-traumatic landscapes drawing on recent (French) philosophies of plasticity (Malabou, Didi-Huberman, et al) and theoretical insights from both geography and archaeology to examine the temporality of landscapes and how we might account for and represent the ‘post’ in ‘post-traumatic’. The case studies a) sites of trauma where the trauma remains visible or tangible; b) sites where trauma occurred but where there is no visible trace of it; c) sites where the primary trauma did not occur, but which are practised and (re)mapped by traumatised subjects. The research explores how post-traumatic landscapes are occupied, practised, repaired and represented.

Dr Mark Finney
m.t.finney@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of History
Sheffield Institute for Interdisciplinary Biblical Studies

Research interests

Mark's primary research interests lie in the area of conflict and violence in the sacred texts and traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and also in contemporary aspects of religion and conflict in the Middle East (e.g., the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, Zionism, Christian Zionism, and the influence of the Christian Right in US foreign policy). In addition, he has research interests in religion in antiquity (particularly Judaism and Christianity); concepts of afterlife; and religion and art.

 

Please Note:

Research applicants proposing Dr Mark Finney as a supervisor should select the Department of History on the application form.

Dr Marta Herrero
m.herrero@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Marta's primary research interest is in the economic foundations of the arts and culture. She is currently working on three projects:

  1. Philanthropy as a funding mechanism for the arts. She has set up a network of academics to study the impact of arts philanthropy in an international context, with collaborators at HEC, Montreal, and the University of Alberta, Canada.
  2. The economic impact of the Cultural Industries in a research collaboration with the Workstation (Sheffield).
  3. International art markets: Principal investigator in a British Academy funded project, with Ling-Yun Tang (University of Hong Kong), exploring the impact of organisational business cultures on the sale and marketing of contemporary Chinese art in the London and Hong Kong art markets.
Dr Munitta Muthana
m.muthana@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research interests

My research focuses on the role of innate immune cells like macrophages and dendritic cells in diseases including cancer and rheumatoid arthritis.  Recently, I have used my knowledge of this area to develop innovative cell-based methods to target anticancer thereapy to tumours.  For example, I have devised a way to use macrophages to deliver large quantities of cancer-killing virus to both primary and secondary tumours simultaneously (click here).  My group is also interested in improving the delivery of therapies to diseased tissue using a nanomagnetic targeting approach.

Dr Mohammed Nassar
m.nassar@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Biomedical Science

Research Interests

My research is focused on investigating the excitability of primary sensory neurones. The cell bodies of these neurones make Dorsal and Trigeminal sensory ganglia, and are part of the peripheral nervous system (PNS).

These neurones convey sensory information from skin and internal organs (e.g. viscera, muscles and bones) to the central nervous system (CNS). Sensory neurones convey both innoxious and noxious stimuli. The latter is perceived in the CNA as pain.

My research interest lies in investigating the molecular changes in sensory neurones that underlie pathological pain. My lab uses a variety of methods based on molecular biology, cellular biology, imaging and functional imaging to identify targets for novel and effective analgesic drugs.

Professor Jennifer Saul
j.saul@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Philosophy

Research interests

Her primary interests are in Philosophy of Language and in Feminism. She has written on lying and misleaing, semantic/pragmatic distinction, propositional attitude semantics, gender and race, sexual harassment, pornography, implicit bias, stereotype threat, and political manipulation.  She ran the Implicit Bias and Philosophy research project, and she has done a great deal of work on the underrepresentation of women in academia, especially philosophy.


She has supervised PhD students on names, lying, conversational implicature, gender, feminism and cosmopolitanism, objectification, autonomy, the family, communicative injustice, ontological injustice, and silencing.

Dr Francesco Sella
f.sella@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Psychology

Proficient mathematical learning represents a key aspect of academic achievement, and it is also an important skill for a competitive workforce. My research focuses on understanding the cognitive mechanisms involved in the acquisition of numerical skills in typically and atypically developing individuals. I have been implementing different research methods to explore basic numerical representations in preschool and primary school children and how these representations relate to mathematical learning. I am particularly interested in how young children learn the numerical meaning of number words and Arabic digits (i.e., symbol-grounding).

Dr James Shucksmith
j.shucksmith@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

Dr Shucksmith's primary research focus is the physical processes that drive water quality transformations within urban drainage and surface water environments. This includes developing techniques for understanding and mitigating the likely pressures on water management caused by climate change, population growth and asset deterioration. His work ranges from experimental based research into solute mixing processes within open channels, vegetated flows and urban flood waters to more applied work in collaboration with industry on integrated water quality modelling and real time control systems. In collaboration with colleagues James also works in fields such as eco-hydraulics, urban flooding and sustainable urban drainage systems.

Professor Simon Tait
s.tait@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

Simon's primary research focus is on the processes associated with erosion, transportation and deposition of sediment in river and urban drainage systems, with a strong emphasis on fundamental flow and grain processes. Linked to this theme is his work in turbulence and free surface wave dynamics associated with flows over rough, water worked sediment deposits. His secondary interests are in applying and developing improved measurement and management methodologies to allow urban water infrastructure systems to cope better with pressures caused by climate change, changing patterns of use and physical deterioration. Current work also includes the study of energy use and recovery in urban water systems.

Professor Peter Bath
p.a.bath@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Research interests

My research interests are in Health Informatics and include the following areas:

  • The use of e-Health resources by different consumer groups.
  • Health information needs and information behaviours of patients, their families, carers and the general public.
  • Evaluation of information systems within health care organisations.
  • Applications of artificial intelligence and data mining techniques to analysing health information.
  • Analysing health information in relation to the health and well-being of older people.
  • Sharing of information and experiences by patients, carers and the public on social media, blogs and web-based discussion forums

I am particularly interested in how patients, carers and health professionals seek, obtain and share information and advice in relation to their health and well-being through online digital resources. 

 

Professor Syed Hussain
syed.hussain@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism

My major areas of interest are management of urological cancers, clinical trials, early drug development and translational medicine. I have set up a large number of clinical trials from early phase to late phase studies during my career. My work on organ preservation in bladder cancer moved all the way from an early phase I study (Hussain et al Annals of Oncology 2001), to phase II efficacy study (Hussain et al BJC 2004) that led to a Cancer Research UK funded study BC2001 trial that was reported in New England Journal of Medicine (James, Hussain, Hall et al April 2012). This study has now changed the standard of care for patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer opting for organ preservation treatment.

Dr Sophie Whyte
Sophie.Whyte@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My broad research is focused on mathematical modelling within health economics. I have gained significant expertise and experience in two related areas:

  • Bayesian calibration of cancer natural history models: This is my main methodological research theme, please see MDM publication http://mdm.sagepub.com/content/31/4/625 and Example Excel model using the Metropolis Hastings algorithm to calibrate a state transition model available to down load from the Downloads box)
  • Early diagnosis of cancer: I have substantial experience having worked on more than 15 projects in this area of applied research.
  • In addition to these main research themes I have undertaken research to inform policy making: Health Technology Assessment (HTA) for NICE (https://www.shef.ac.uk/scharr/sections/heds/collaborations/tag) , and research as part of the Policy Research Unit in Economic Evaluation of Health and Care Interventions (EEPRU) for DH (http://www.eepru.org.uk/)
Dr Nasreen Akhtar
n.akhtar@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism

My lab focuses on how cell-matrix adhesions and Rho family GTPases regulate epithelial polarity and morphogenesis of normal breast tissue and how these signals are subverted in breast cancer. We are studying the mechanisms by which integrin signals guide tissue morphogenesis at three levels: First, how integrins instruct epithelial cells to polarize and form lumen spaces within tissues; second, how integrin-mediated mechanical forces engineer the morphogenetic tissue shapes of a branched epithelium and third, how integrins direct the spatial ordering of different mammary cell lineages to form the correct tissue structure. Mammary tissue forms a network of branched ducts connected to alveoli with hollow lumens, similar to many other secretory organs. We use Cre-LoxP genetic deletion both in vivo and in primary 3D organoid cultures of mammary epithelia, to unravel the relative contribution of integrins and GTPases to mammary tissue organization and function.

Dr Madeleine Callaghan
m.callaghan@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of English Literature

Research interests

My primary area of interest is Romantic poetry. I have recently finished a monograph on the relationship on Percy Bysshe Shelley’s poetry and drama, entitled Shelley's Living Artistry: Letters, Poems, Plays (with Liverpool University Press). I am also finishing a book which examines the poetry and plays of Byron and Shelley and their development of the poet-hero in their works, and am beginning research on a book on Byron's influence on twentieth century British, Irish, and American poets.

I am currently supervising doctoral theses on the second generation Romantic poets and quest, Romantic influences on the poetry of Wilfred Owen, pleasure and pain in the poetry of John Keats, androgyny in the poetry and drama of Percy Bysshe Shelley, and the development of the pastoral genre in Romantic poetry. I am interested in supervising PhD candidates in any of my research interests, especially in Romantic or post-Romantic poetry.


Professor John Clark
john.clark@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Computer Science
I have a general interest in dependable systems and high integrity software and systems but my primary focus is on cybersecurity aspects.  I also have significant interests in the Internet of Things. I have particular interests in applying AI to problems in cybersecurity. Below is a summary of my main interests:
 
*  safe and secure systems
*  security of manufacturing systems, security of robotics and security of buildings
*. approaches to user authentication.
*. use of AI for crypto design and analysis
*  use of AI in quantum information processing (with a security focus)
*  use of AI for testing of modern critical systems (e.g. autonomous ones)
*  security and safety of AI
*  use of AI to reverse engineer hidden phenomena
*  use of AI in malware detection and intrusion detection.
*  use of AI in digital forensics
Professor Barry Gibson
b.j.gibson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

The primary focus on my research has been the experience of oral health conditions and to this end I have been instrumental in securing funding from commercial bodies to explore the impact of dentine sensitivity on everyday life. This research conducted along with colleagues in the Unit of Dental Public Health has resulted in a new measure of the impact of dentine sensitivity.

I am also continuing to study the sociology of the mouth in everyday life by looking at the impact of oral conditions and the experience of the mouth in the media and everyday life. This work involves the use of systems theory, consumerism and the sociology of the body.

I maintain a healthy interest in grounded theory and to this end I continue to write on the method. I like to focus on blending it with other approaches such as systems theory and critical theory and at the same time I like to clarify the original version of grounded theory.

Dr Ian Gregory-Smith
i.gregory-smith@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Economics

Research interests

Ian’s primary research interests concern the executive labour market and related issues associated with gender, corporate governance, executive remuneration and shareholder voting. His work often applies econometric techniques to panel datasets. More recently, Ian's work on the executive labour market has developed to consider the implications for the firm's international strategy on issues such as exporting, hiring, networking, and innovation. He is also interested in how the economics of sport (particularly cricket) can provide insights into the processes by which decisions are made within firms.

Ian’s research has been used to inform policy at HM Treasury and the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). Recently, he has made submissions to the BIS’ ‘Executive Remuneration’ and ‘The Future of Narrative Reporting’ Discussion Papers, and the ‘Hutton Review of Fair pay in the Public Sector’. He also engages with corporate governance industry participants such as Manifest Information Services Ltd.

Professor Caroline Jackson
c.m.jackson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Archaeology

Research interests:

My research interests are very varied and diverse. For instance I have worked on lithics in Swaziland, conducted surveying work with the University of Cardiff at the Sacred Animal Necropolis in Saqqara and excavated at Amarna in Egypt.

My main research is however, on the study and scientific analysis of archaeological materials, specialising in glass and other vitreous materials such as faience. The primary focus of this work is in Bronze Age Egypt and the Aegean mainly from production sites and on Roman glasses from consumption contexts. I use scientific methods to analyse archaeological glass and experimental archaeology to elucidate patterns relating to provenance, trade and consumption in the ancient and historic world.

  • Material culture in the Roman and Ancient Egyptian worlds.
  • The technology of glasses
  • The analysis of glasses to explore production and consumption patterns
  • Experimental archaeology
  • Craft production in Egypt
  • Provenance studies
Dr Jayanta Manoharmayum
J.Manoharmayum@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

The absolute Galois group of the rationals is my primary interest. It contains almost all arithmetic information: eg, solutions to explicit diophantine equations (as in Fermat's Last Theorem). The whole group in general is rather too large an object to study; a better way of understanding the Galois group is through its representations, and this brings out deep connections with other mathematical objects (such as modular forms). For example, given a two dimensional representation of the Galois group satisfying `usual conditions', there should be a modular form whose Fourier coefficients are related to the traces of the representation. The precise correspondences are conjecturally given by the conjectures of Artin (complex representations), Fontaine and Mazur (p-adic representations), and Serre (finite characteristic). It is aspects of these conjectures, both over the rationals and in the setting of totally real number fields, that I am most interested in.

Dr Amber Regis
a.regis@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of English Literature

Research interests

My primary research interests lie in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century literature, particularly life-writing, women’s writing and ‘queer’ identities. I also work in adaptation studies and have published on lesbian period drama, docu-soap television and Dickens on film.

I am currently pursuing several research projects. These include a book length study of Victorian auto/biography and its relation to fiction and narrative poetry, and a new edition of the Memoirs of John Addington Symonds. I am also working on essays exploring the legacy of Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own in feminist life-writing criticism, representations of Charlotte Brontë on the twenty-first-century stage, and a study of ‘living history’ museums and TV series that seek to (re )construct the Victorian quotidian.


Dr Maria-Cruz Villa-Uriol
m.villa-uriol@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Dr Maria-Cruz Villa-Uriol's main research interests are:

  • the personalisation of models using computational imaging and modelling techniques, 
  • the composition of scientific workflows, 
  • and the use and development of data-driven decision-making strategies to support clinical decisions using heterogeneous data sources.

The data sources typically used in ther research are:

  • personalised VPH (Virtual Physiological Human) models, 
  • clinical databases, 
  • mobile sensors capturing a wide variety of variables describing an individual and his/her environment and mobile healthcare. 

Her primary area of interest is in the cardiovascular domain with an emphasis in clinical translation.

She is member of the Organisations, Information and Knowledge Group (Oak), INSIGNEO institute for in silico Modelling and Center for Assistive Technology and Connected Healthcare (CATCH).

Dr Thomas Webb
t.j.webb@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Animal and Plant Sciences

Research interests:

My primary research interest is in macroecology – what determines the distribution and abundance of species at very large scales? – although I am also interested in interdisciplinary approaches to sustainability and innovation, and have participated in the 2007 NESTA Crucible (www.nesta.org.uk/programmes/connect/crucible). My macroecological research has included work on a variety of groups of species, generally birds, but is now focused on marine systems. My approach relies on the statistical analysis of large and complex databases, and I have particular interests in the following questions:

  • How are interspecific macroecological patterns related to the population ecology of individual species?
  • How do the dynamics of local communities scale up to produce macroecological relationships?
  • Does the distributional extent of a species owe more to evolutionary processes or to accidents of history and geography?
  • How does human activity affect macroecological relationships over time and space?
Mrs Gemma Arblaster
g.arblaster@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research Interests

My research interests are often related to clinical practice and include:

  • Orthoptic clinical practice and improving the evidence base around the measures of visual function and binocular single vision we use in children in adults
  • New and/or different ways of measuring binocular single vision, in particular gross binocular single vision and how this relates to our functional ability, task performance and visual performance in everyday life
  • Strabismus, including how to best measure the impact of strabismus on everyday life and the outcomes of conservative and surgical management of strabismus
  • Eye movements and ocular motor stability, in particular the impact of monocular visual loss on ocular motor stability and unilateral vertical nystagmus (the Heimann-Bielschowsky Phenomenon)
  • Nystagmus and oscillopsia, including improving the information we give to patients about nystagmus, improving the nystagmus care pathway and exploring the use of VR technology as an educational tool and possible treatment option for nystagmus
  • Low vision, including the clinical assessment and impact of having low vision, and the effectiveness of interventions for low vision
Mr Andrew Booth
a.booth@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My research interests focus on all methods of systematic review,  evidence synthesis, evidence based practice, and knowledge translation. I am particularly interested in systematic review topics from developing countries, particularly from Sub-Saharan Africa, and in public health topics such as alcohol and HIV/AIDS. I have published with students in topics such as medication adherence, social marketing,  disaster management and evidence based management. My current research students are working in knowledge management in acute hospitals and use of NICE guidance in Social care.  I have been involved in development of a wide range of tools for dissemination, both web based and as online briefings. In 2013 I was one of the first to achieve the University of Sheffield's PhD by Publications with my thesis entitled Acknowledging a Dual Heritage for Qualitative Evidence Synthesis: Harnessing the Qualitative Research and Systematic Review Research Traditions. My most recent interests centre on multiple types of review, including rapid reviews, mapping reviews and scoping reviews.

Dr Nils Krone
n.krone@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism

Research interests

His main clinical interests are inborn errors of steroidogenesis, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, disorders of sex development (DSD), and PCOS; his main research interests are on inborn errors of steroid hormone biosynthesis and steroid hormone metabolism in health and disease.

Current efforts of his work concentrate on the implementation of model systems to study genetic variants and the integration of diagnostic methods in adrenal disease and DSD. His group has implemented various in vitro assays to study enzymatic defects in steroidogenesis. The most recent work of his group explores the consequences of disrupted steroid hormone synthesis and action on whole organism employing zebrafish as a model organism in translational steroid hormone research (Endocrinology 2013; Endocrinology 2016). This research is based at the Bateson Centre.

The main focus of this clinical research program is on CAH. He leads on a multicentre, 17 tertiary paediatric endocrine centres in the UK, NIHR RD TRC funded project to establish the evidence basis on the current health status in children and young people with congenital adrenal hyperplasia in the UK. In addition, he works on a program to improve health care deliver for children and young people with adrenal conditions and DSD.

Professor Scott Weich
s.weich@sheffield.ac.uk

School of Health and Related Research

Scott Weich is Professor of Mental Health in ScHARR.  He is also a practicing NHS Consultant Psychiatrist.

His research interests include public mental health and the study of the distribution, causes and consequences of common mental disorders, as well as mental wellbeing.  He has experience of large-scale observational and secondary research looking at socio-economic, ethnic, gender and spatial variation in mental disorders and their outcomes.

Recent research includes the study of compulsion in mental health services, inclding compulsory admission and the use of Community Treatment Orders.  He is also undertaking research into the way in which patient experience data are collected and used to influence service improvement in NHS mental health services.

Prof Weich has an interest in the evaluation of service change in real-world settings.  He is also interested in the evaluating improvements in the efficiency with which existing services are delivered, and in evaluating the use of technology in mental health care, and in the application of experience-based co-design in mental health settings.

Dr Ros Williams
r.g.williams@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Sociological Studies

My research falls at the intersections of Science and Technology Studies, Sociologies of Race and Ethnicity, and Digital Sociology.

My current and previous research includes:

  • exploration of institutional practices of stem cell banking which included looking at race classifications, legacies of health care inequity, and genetic understandings of racial differences in blood and tissue in a UK context
  • digital health and self-monitoring technologies - user, commercial and policy perspectives through ethnography, interview, and novel material methodologies
  • stem cell donor recruitment activities in minority communities including ethnography of minority community donor drives, and digital method-based analysis of online minority ethnicity recruitment campaigns that focus on mixed raced donors

Interested in supervising research students who are focused on the following topics (in UK and/or other national/regional/international contexts)

  • health activism - particularly targeted at, or taking place within, racialised communities
  • processes of racialisation (and, more generally, invocations of racial difference) within biomedical contexts
  • mixed raced experience, particularly in the context of health, and of new genetic sciences
  • the intersection of race/ethnicity and digital media in general
Dr Simon Danby
s.danby@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

The skin serves as an important barrier that keeps moisture in the body and prevents the incursion of harmful exogenous agents, such as irritants and allergens, and resists the invasion of pathogens. A growing body of evidence suggests a primary role for the ‘skin barrier’ in the pathogenesis of a broad range of inflammatory skin disorders, including contact dermatitis, ichthyosis, psoriasis, rosacea and atopic dermatitis (AD). Repeated barrier disruption for instance induces epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation. Current medicine is based on the reactive treatment of these downstream consequences of skin barrier dysfunction, and includes the use of both anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative compounds. My research focuses on increasing our understanding of the skin barrier defect and developing treatments to correct it under the following core themes:

  • Gene-environment interactions in the development of atopic dermatitis
  • Development of treatments for atopic dermatitis
  • The improvement of neonatal skincare
  • Interaction of topical pharmaceutical and cosmetic agents with the skin barrier

A greater understanding of the underlying skin barrier defect promises to firstly identify susceptible individuals early on, and secondly to deliver novel therapeutic options for targeted skin barrier repair with the potential to prevent the development of clinical disease.

Professor Andrew Furley
a.j.furley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Biomedical Science

Research Interests

Our research is focussed on the role L1CAM-like cell adhesion molecules (L1-CNTNs) in neural development and disease. L1-CNTNs affect neural function at all stages, including the earliest proliferation and differentiation of progenitor and stem cells (Bizzoca et al 2003; Ma et al 2008; Xenaki et al., 2011; Bizzoca et al., 2012Ha et al., 2015), the guidance of axons (Cohen et al 1998; Law et al 2008; Dang et al 2012), through to firing of action potentials (Poliak et al 2003) and functioning of synapses (Bliss et al 2000). As a result, these molecules are widely implicated in neurological disease and cancers. Our aim is to understand the cellular mechanisms through which L1-CNTNs affect this wide variety of processes. Our current work is focussed particularly on the role of NrCAM in regulating the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) pathway in medulloblastoma (Xenaki et al., 2011) and in neural stem cells, with a specific emphasis on its role in controlling the trafficking of SHH pathway components into and out of primary cilia. This work is supported by BTRS.

Dr Stuart Johnson
s.johnson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Biomedical Science

Research Interests

Signalling characteristics of cochlear hair cells

Mammalian cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs) are the primary sensory cells of the auditory pathway. Their job is to convert sound vibrations into an electrical signal that can be interpreted by the brain and it is vital that the information is transmitted with high fidelity and temporal precision. One of the major causes of hearing loss is associated with a loss of IHC function.

The aim of my research is to find out how IHCs accurately encode sounds over wide ranges of frequency and intensity, and how the information is processed on its way to the brain. Knowledge of how the ear processes sound will inform the development of hearing aids, including cochlear implants. An additional aspect of my research involves the physiological analysis of human stem cells that are being used to replace damaged nerve fibres to restore hearing (in collaboration with Dr Marcelo Rivolta).

In order to achieve this I will study IHCs in the isolated cochlea using a combination of electrophysiological, cell imaging and molecular biology techniques.

Professor Sheila MacNeil
s.macneil@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

Her research focuses on developing tissue engineering which will benefit patients, alongside fundamental work to develop new understanding and tools in the area of tissue engineering. Her primary research interests are in tissue engineering of soft tissues – skin, oral mucosa, urethra and cornea, with a strong focus on translating research for clinical benefit. Her group have a long history of working with clinical NHS colleagues using tissue engineered skin to benefit burns patients (from 1992) and more recently patients with chronic ulcers (2004) and patients requiring reconstructive surgery of the urethra (from 2007). She has developed the product Myskin™ which was clinically evaluated and developed commercially and has been available in the UK for patients with extensive skin loss due to burns injuries and to chronic non-healing ulcers from 2005, currently available through the company Altrika. Additionally she has developed 3D tissue engineered models used to study a wide range of normal and abnormal conditions spanning wound healing, skin contracture, pigmentation, melanoma invasion, angiogenesis, bacterial infection and skin sensitisation.

Dr Peter Matanle
p.matanle@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of East Asian Studies

Research interests

Dr Matanle is pursuing a number of related research themes in collaboration with colleagues from around the world. Currently he is working on a co-authored monograph on Lifetime Employment in 21st Century Japan, as well as articles on depopulation and regional sustainability in East Asia, and postdoctoral career formation in Japanese studies.

In the future, Peter plans to research the relationship between demographic change and resource consumption in Japan's rural regions, focusing on the spatial impacts of depopulation on resource demand.

I have successfully supervised students through to completion in employment studies and the sociology of work and in the cultural geography of Japan. I am currently primary supervisor for four students in regional and environmental studies, and the sociology and culture of work, all of which focus on Japan.

I welcome applications for students in any of the above subjects, and I am particularly keen to develop long-term collaborative relationships that broaden the geographical scope of my own research. In future I also want to develop my work in environmental studies, with an emphasis on the human-environmental consequences of regional depopulation in the Asia-Pacific region.

Dr Ranjan Sen
ranjan.sen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of English Language and Linguistics

Research interests

My primary research interest lies in developing techniques to reconstruct and account for phonological change over time, and investigating to what extent synchronic structure plays a role in diachronic phonology. One aim is to improve methods used to access fine-grained phonetic evidence from dead languages, to allow a better evaluation of theories of change grounded in phonetics. We can then better address the much-debated question of whether phonetics and analogical pressures alone drive sound change, or if structural constraints play a role.

My current research focuses on three areas: (1) investigating the role played by prosodic structure in sound change, examining the roles of syllable and foot structure in Latin and other languages; (2) working in collaboration with Professor Joan Beal (University of Sheffield) and Dr Nura Yáñez-Bouza (University of Manchester) to construct a database of eighteenth-century English phonology from contemporary sources, (e.g. pronouncing dictionaries), in order to address problems in English phonology, both historical and contemporary; (3) working in collaboration with the Oxford Phonetics Laboratory to investigate theories of speech production and phonological representation in the mind, from the evidence of reading aloud non-words, examining questions of both phonological and psycholinguistic significance.


Dr Elizabeth Seward
e.p.seward@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Biomedical Science

Research Interests

Aberrant secretion of neurotransmitters, hormones or immune mediators contributes to the pathology of a wide variety of chronic neurological, endocrine and inflammatory diseases ranging from stress and hypertension through to asthma and irritable bowel syndrome. Research in our lab is focussed on identifying the signalling pathways and molecules controlling secretion from neurones and mast cells, with a special interest in voltage-gated (CaV), ligand-gated (P2X and nAChR), receptor-operated (TRPC) and store-operated (Orai) calcium channels, IgE and G protein coupled receptors (P2Y, Histamine), and SNARE regulatory proteins (synaptotagmins, Doc2 and Munc13).  Most of our work is performed at the level of isolated primary cells using high resolution techniques including patch-clamp electrophysiology, carbon fibre amperometry, calcium imaging and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy with various fluorescence-based biosensors.

Recent highlights of our research include (1) the discovery of ATP-sensitive P2X receptors on human lung mast cells, activation of which may contribute to the pathophysiology of asthma, (2) the first demonstration of Munc13 as an essential effector of phospholipase C-coupled G protein coupled receptor regulation of neurotransmitter release in mammalian  cells, and (3) the modulatory action of synaptotagmin IV on the calcium-sensitivity of the neuronal fusion machinery.

Dr Pawel Surowiec
p.surowiec@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Journalism Studies

International Politics, Media, & Persuasive Communicative Practices

In his research, Paweł is intrigued by questions relating to the expansion of propaganda to new social spaces, and the reinvention of this practice, particularly in the context of foreign policy, diplomacy and cyberspace (e.g. digital diplomacy).

His primary area of interest is propaganda and new derivatives of this form of political communication, which are emerging at the intersection of evolving media ecologies and socio-political changes taking place in international politics and include: public diplomacy; nation branding; strategic communication; computational propaganda and digital diplomacy.

His work examines these concepts and practices in relation to collective identities, particularly national identities and nationalisms, as well as illiberal trends re-shaping contemporary politics. He is in the process of developing a theory of hybridity of soft power statecraft.

PhD supervision

Pawel is particularly interested in hearing from research students focusing on the following areas:

  • Political communication and digital campaigning, soft power, public diplomacy and digital diplomacy
  • Political economy of communication and media
  • Post-socialist transition and shifting collective identities in Central and Eastern Europe
  • The role of broadcast media and social media in the conduct of foreign policy
Dr Richard Thackray
r.thackray@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

Sustainable steelmaking
Research is focussed on identifying strategies to produce more energy efficient steelmaking processes and to improve material efficiency. We work with industrial partners such as Siemens to investigate sustainable plate manufacture, and with Tata Steel to conduct research in areas as diverse as alternative materials for ironmaking, dephosphorisation mechanisms in oxygen steelmaking, the effect of reduced niobium content on microstructure of pipeline grades, life cycle analysis and substance flow analysis of critical elements used in steelmaking, use of alternative waste streams in primary steel production, and improved reuse and recycling of by-products.

Secondary steelmaking and continuous casting
Research is centred on understanding the effect of thermomechanical processing on inclusion formation and behaviour as well as developing new methodologies for characterising inclusions. Casting research focuses on understanding the role of mould powders on the both the internal and surface quality of cast products, particularly casting of next generation (TRIP, DP) steels.

Other
Other areas of active research include modelling and design of castings for the nuclear supply chain in partnership with Sheffield Forgemasters, modelling of the behaviour of steel in fire, and the development of new modelling methodologies for predicting microstructure and segregation in continuously cast steels.

Professor Keith Worden
K.Worden@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Keith's research is concerned with applications of advanced signal processing and machine learning methods to structural dynamics. The primary application is in the aerospace industry, although there has also been interaction with ground transport and offshore industries.

One of the research themes concerns non-linear systems. The research conducted here is concerned with assessing the importance of non-linear modelling within a given context and formulating appropriate methods of analysis. The analysis of non-linear systems can range from the fairly pragmatic to the extremes of mathematical complexity. The emphasis within the research group here is on the pragmatic and every attempt is made to maintain contact with engineering necessity.

Another major activity within the research group concerns structural health monitoring for aerospace systems and structures. The research is concerned with developing automated systems for inspection and diagnosis, with a view to reducing the cost-of-ownership of these high integrity structures. The methods used are largely adapted from pattern recognition and machine learning; often the algorithms make use of biological concepts e.g. neural networks, genetic algorithms and ant-colony metaphors. The experimental approaches developed range from global inspection using vibration analysis to local monitoring using ultrasound.

Dr Thushan Indrajit de Silva
t.desilva@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease

My interests fall into three main areas:

  1. My primary interest is the study of anti-viral immune responses in the context of both vaccination and natural infection. Building on skills gained during my PhD, which focused on HIV-specific humoral and T-cell correlates of protection from disease progression in HIV-2 infection, the focus of my current research is the detailed mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) in Gambian children using a systems vaccinology approach, including interactions with the host nasopharyngeal microbiome.
  2. Extending my work on immune responses in immunosuppressed hosts, I am interested in vaccine responses in Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant patients, collaborating with Professor John Snowden and Professor Diana Greenfield at STH.
  3. Aligning with The Florey Institute strategy, I am leading pilot studies characterizing MRSA (Sri Lanka) and Streptococcus pyogenes (The Gambia) isolates via whole genome sequencing.
Professor Colin Bingle
c.d.bingle@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

My long-standing research interests have been focused on cellular differentiation and regulation of gene expression within the developing and adult pulmonary epithelium. This work involves the isolation of pulmonary epithelial cell specific genes (principally the BPIF/PLUNC and WFDC families) as well as the transcription factors, which regulate their expression. This work also involves studies of epithelial cell specific differentiation and understanding the role of distinct stem/basal cells in this process. This work has allowed me to use disease models, human clinical material and our novel genes to study aspects of pulmonary cell plasticity in the lung and changes that occur in IPF and COPD

Over the past few years my interests have also expanded into the fields of the genetics of complex diseases, pulmonary immunology, innate immunity and host defence and now a major focus of my work is on pulmonary innate immunity, the control of pulmonary inflammation and the role of innate defence pathways in the development of chronic lung disease.

I also work extensively with primary human and mouse airway epithelial cells in differentiated air liquid interface cultures using them as tools to understand the regulation of airway epithelial cell specific genes. At a more clinical level we are also studying host/pathogen interactions using both viral (RSV, flu, MHV68) and bacterial (Pseudomonas, Staph, NTHi) infections. This work has allowed me to align myself with the work of the Florey Institute for Host/Pathogen Interactions. In addition to our airway studies we have also developed primary middle ear epithelial cell cultures for our work on infections in Otitis Media which complements my developing interest in middle ear biology.

This applied work has allowed me to continue to study the role of epithelial differentiation in the airways and to use disease models and our novel genes to study aspects of pulmonary cell plasticity in the lung. This is particular focused on epithelial changes in the lungs of patients with IPF and COPD. Our recent work has begun to uncover a role for BPIF proteins in the pathogenesis  of lung disease using both human material and murine models. It has also led to new avenues of work that focus on the epithelial responses in nasopharyngeal infections and in Otitis Media.


Dr Thomas Muskett
t.muskett@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Human Communication Sciences (old code)

Research interests

My work involves application of a qualitative research approach called Conversation Analysis (CA) to very closely examine video recordings of real-life interactions involving people who are described as having communication difficulties, in particular children with a diagnosis of autism.  CA provides a powerful method through which to examine interaction, as it enables socially-oriented accounts to be developed of how people's talk and other behaviour (even if apparently unusual or 'disordered') relates to what others at the scene have just said or done, or been saying or doing (see links to the right for more on CA).

The use of CA therefore allows for detailed, and often very novel, accounts to be developed on the nature of 'communication difficulties', 'social problems' and 'problematic behaviours', as it enables description of the apparent individual meanings, functions and consequences of these for the people actually in the interactions in which they occur.  I am interested in how CA accounts of communication difficulties relate to what is typically written about conditions such as autism across different disciplines, and how these might reciprocally interface with concerns in fields such as critical disability studies and the new social studies of childhood.  Along these lines, I contribute to a number of inter-disciplinary social scientific research groups within the University of Sheffield, including Disability @ UoS, and the Body, Health and Well-being Research Interest Group within the Centre for the Study of Childhood and Youth.

I also maintain a strong interest in health service research and the evaluation of complex interventions. I am particularly interested in the use of multimodal and eclectic approaches to examine the ‘value’ of interventions and/or care pathways for children and adolescents with complex needs.

Dr Stefania Vicari
s.vicari@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Stefania's overarching research interest is in dynamics of civic engagement on digital platforms of communication. Her approach to online data is based on a variety of textual analysis techniques - with an increasing focus on text analytics - informed by social network and framing theories. Stefania specifically focuses on:

  • Digital activism: Stefania's early research focused on how digital media ease upward and downward scale shifts (i.e., from local to transnational and vice versa) in framing grievances. Work in this camp investigated the Global Justice Movement and the World Social Forum. She is also particularly interested in social media use with relevance to public sphere processes in the context of protest events, issue publics, everyday talk. Her work in this field has specifically focused on interactional and deliberative processes in the Cuban blogosphere and on meaning construction on Twitter streams relevant to anti-austerity protests in Italy.
  • Digital health. Stefania is interested in the role of digital media in health democratizing processes, especially in processes of self-care, patient advocacy, health public debate, and health activism. Her main interest is in if, how and to what extent digital media may enhance bottom-up, patient-centred health practices. Stefania's work in this area is currently looking at online affordances for rare disease patient organisations in advocacy and activist dynamics and rare disease discourse practices on Facebook and Twitter.


Stefania has supervised PhD projects looking at different aspects of digital media use, among which, digital literacy, digital activism and online political participation. She is particularly interested in supervising students investigating digital activism, social media and health and/or who wish to apply digital methods approaches.

Dr Veronica Barnsley
v.barnsley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of English Literature

My primary research interests are in colonial and postcolonial literatures from India and Africa, with a particular focus on alternative and global modernisms and writing interested in children, youth and development.

I am currently completing the manuscript of my first monograph, Postcolonial Children: Infancy and Development in South Asian Fiction in English. The book considers the figure of the child in fiction that deals with anti-colonial activism, Indian independence and the postcolonial state, looking at writers including Mulk Raj Anand, R.K. Narayan, Attia Hosain, Shashi Deshpande and Nadeem Aslam.

I am also beginning a new project called ‘Youth and Health in Postcolonial Literatures: India, Nigeria, South Africa’, a comparative analysis of the concept of youth that seeks to make connections between Postcolonial Studies and the growing field of Medical Humanities.

I am a founding member of The Northern Postcolonial Network, which supports knowledge exchange and networking amongst scholars working on postcolonial topics across the north of England and organisations and community groups with intersecting interests. We build sustainable relationships with groups and communities through research, public engagement and creative workshops in which we can explore issues including migration, asylum, human rights and inclusive pedagogy. Details of our past events and future activities can be found here www.northernpostcolonialnetwork.com

I am a member of The British Association of Modernist Studies, the Modernist Studies Association and the Postcolonial Studies Association.

Professor Iain Coldham
i.coldham@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

New methodology in organic chemistry.

Synthetic chemistry depends on reliable, high-yielding and selective reactions that access a wide variety of different structures. The discovery of new methods in synthesis is crucial to expand the range of novel compounds that can be made easily. Especially important is the development of new carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. Our research group is studying the use of organometallic compounds in asymmetric synthesis, especially for carbon-carbon bond formation of nitrogen-containing compounds, prevalent in many biologically active molecules. We have found that 2-lithiopyrrolidines, piperidines and other cyclic amines undergo dynamic resolution in the presence of a chiral ligand (L*), leading to highly enantioenriched 2-substituted cyclic amine products. We have determined the kinetics of enantiomerization of several chiral organolithium compounds.

Synthesis of biologically active compounds.

We are using dipolar cycloaddition chemistry to access a variety of alkaloid structures. Intramolecular cycloadditions provide an efficient means to build up bicyclic and polycyclic ring systems in a rapid and stereocontrolled way. We have shown that this chemistry is applicable to the synthesis of the core ring system of the alkaloid manzamine A, which has significant biological activity (anti-cancer, anti-malarial, and other activity). One dipole that we use is an azomethine ylide, that we make by condensation of a secondary amine with an aldehyde. Intramolecular cycloaddition sets up two new rings and up to four new stereocentres in a single step. We have prepared simpler analogues of manzamine A and other heteroaromatic compounds to probe their biological activity.

Recently, we have found that primary amines (such as amino-acids, amino-esters, hydroxylamine) can be used to condense with an aldehyde and promote a cascade process involving imine formation, cyclization, ylide formation and cycloaddition all in one pot. This chemistry provides an efficient method to prepare three rings directly from an acyclic aldehyde in a stereocontrolled way and has been applied to the total syntheses of several alkaloids (such as aspidospermidine, aspidospermine, quebrachamine and myrioxazine A).

Dr Spencer Collis
s.collis@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research interests

Cellular responses to DNA damage involve the orchestration of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair factors, which are rapidly activated and mobilised to sites of DNA damage. Defects in checkpoint and DNA repair factors are causal for several genetically unstable human disorders that predispose to cancer. A detailed molecular understanding of these pathways will expand our knowledge of cancer development and progression, which may lead to novel or improved treatments

We have recently identified and partially characterised HCLK2 as a novel factor required for the cellular response to DNA damage (Collis et al 2007). Through proteomic and yeast two-hybrid approaches we have now discovered a number of novel HCLK2-interacting proteins (CIPs; Collis et al 2008) which we are characterising further using a combination of proteomics, loss of function (RNAi), sub-cellular localisation, and biochemical studies to determine their role in DNA damage response pathways. Encouragingly, our preliminary studies have shown that cells depleted for several CIPs confer defects in DNA damage signalling.

In addition, we have recently completed a human genome-wide RNAi screen to identify novel genome maintenance factors (GMFs). A high proportion of known DNA replication and DNA damage/checkpoint factors were identified in the primary screen, in addition to a number of new GMFs. Secondary screens are now underway to refine the list of candidates, which will then be depleted individually in cells using RNAi treatments and subjected to various assays to determine their roles in DNA damage signalling and/or repair. Preliminary studies using 4 individual RNAi`s against two novel GMFs have confirmed evidence of genome instability and defective DNA damage signalling in these cells.

Based on these and future experiments, we are investigating if mutations in any CIPs or GMFs are causal for cancer and genetically unstable human disorders, as well as defining their potential as putative anti-cancer drug targets.

Dr Nigel Harwood
n.harwood@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of English Language and Linguistics

Research Interests

I am interested in hearing from PhD applicants who wish to conduct qualitative or predominantly qualitative projects relating to academic writing, academic literacies, ESP/EAP, or language teaching materials/textbooks.

I am a qualitative researcher, and the primary research methods I use in my work are interviews and textual analysis. My doctoral thesis is a corpus-based study of how the personal pronouns I and WE are used in academic writing across four disciplines (Business, Economics, Computing, and Physics) by ‘experts’ writing journal articles and postgraduate students writing dissertations. I have published papers on taking a lexical approach to ELT and on taking a corpus-based critical pragmatic approach to English for academic purposes. More recent work includes research on citation in academic writing, on proofreaders’ beliefs and practices when working on student texts, and on supervisors’ and supervisees’ experiences of master’s dissertation supervision. I have published my findings in outlets such as Applied Linguistics, Written Communication, Text & Talk, English for Specific Purposes, Journal of Pragmatics, Studies in Higher Education, Journal of the American Society for Information Science & Technology, and Journal of Business & Technical Communication.

In general, my research interests lie in the following areas:

  • Analysis of academic writing—analysing the text and interviewing writers about their texts
  • Citation analysis
  • Academic literacies in higher education
  • Academic socialisation in higher education
  • English for specific and academic purposes
  • Development and use of and language teaching materials and textbooks
  • Critical pedagogy
  • English language teaching and learning


Dr Gwendolen Reilly
g.reilly@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

Our research has applications in orthopaedic and dental medicine, where clinicians are looking for improved methods to repair skeletal tissues; bone, tendon and cartilage.

Bone tissue engineering.
The aim of bone tissue engineering is to create bone matrix in the laboratory for clinical implantation and as an experimental tool. Our research in this area focuses on two main themes; the effects of mechanical stimulation on differentiation and matrix formation by bone cells and the interactions between precursor bone cells and their biomaterial substrate. Mechanical stimuli examined include dynamic compression, stretch and fluid flow induced shear stresses using a range of bioreactors (including a collaboration with Bose ElectroForce systems group).

Musculoskeletal cell mechanobiology.
We are interested in how skeletal cells respond to extrinsic and intrinsic stimuli by organizing the proteins and mineral they secrete in a way which enhances the strength of the matrix. This information can then be used to manipulate tissue engineered structures in order to induce structurally sound matrix formation. We specifically focus on mechanosensation mechanisms found on the cell membrane; the cell’s proteoglycan (sugar-based) coat and a small organelle that protrudes from the cell membrane – the primary cilia.

Orthopaedic biomaterials.
We investigate the interactions between musculoskeletal cells and orthopaedic and dental materials that are implanted into bone. Materials investigated include porous metals, polymer scaffolds and peptide coated surfaces (in collaboration with Orla Protein Technologies). This research encompasses study of the mechanical properties of biomaterial scaffolds, cell-material interactions, cell mechanics and cell signalling.

Professor Richard Ross
r.j.ross@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism

Research Interests

The focus of both my clinical and basic research is on optimising pituitary hormone replacement. My group have identified and characterised uncommon mutations in the growth hormone receptor which have led to fundamental observations on the mechanism by which the growth hormone receptor signals through a pre-formed dimer. This work has led to a greater understanding of the regulation of growth hormone secretion and recently the group have developed a long acting form of growth hormone which has exceptional pharmacokinetic properties that means administration may only be required once a fortnight or once a month. This work was published in Nature Medicine in 2007.

The Clinical Research Programme has been investigating different regimens for replacing cortisol, testosterone and oestrogen in hypopituitary, hypogonadal and adrenal insufficient patients. The group have designed a new modified release form of hydrocortisone, Chronocort, which in phase 1 studies has proven to replicate the normal circadian rhythm of cortisol. This work is currently being taken through to phase 2 studies in congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients. Other work has examined the incidence of hypogonadism in cancer survivors and optimising oestrogen replacement in young women of fertile years.

I co-chair the Endocrine Unit Management Team which consists of 6 Consultant Endocrinologists and runs a number of unique and innovative specialist clinics in the Health Care Trust including: Pituitary Clinic, Transition Clinic for Paediatric Endocrinology, Late Effects Clinic for Cancer survivors, Joint Surgical Endocrine Clinics, Obesity Clinic, Genetic Endocrine Clinic and a Pituitary Multidisciplinary Team.

Publications and Patents: 234 publications during career, 34 publications in the last 5 years, Scopus h-index of 34, 7 papers cited over 100 times, 2 over 200 times and 1 over 300 times.  35 patents granted from 7 independent patent families.

  1. Patent granted 2010: C Strasburger, M Bidlingmaier, Z Wu, G Matarese, R Ross. Leptin antagonist and method for quantitative measurement of leptin. US 7,807,154 B2
  2. Patent granted 2012: R Ross, P Artymiuk, J Sayers.  Fusion protein compromising growth hormone and growth hormone receptor. US 8,173,782 B2
Dr Michael Hippler
m.hippler@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

The aim of my research is the development of new methods and applications of ultra-sensitive, high-resolution laser spectroscopy to study the structure and dynamics of molecules and clusters. The understanding of intramolecular primary processes in polyatomic molecules at the fully quantum dynamical level remains among the most challenging research questions in physics and chemistry, with applications also in biology and environmental sciences. High-resolution spectroscopy is among the most powerful tools in advancing such research and it is crucial in this context to develop new and ever more powerful spectroscopic experiments.

In my work in Zürich, I successfully developed new experimental techniques for the infrared laser spectroscopy of gas-phase molecules. These techniques have been applied to the study of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution, vibrational mode-specific tunnelling of hydrogen-bonded clusters and stereomutation dynamics. In one class of experiments, pulsed IR laser systems are used to excite vibrational transitions and a second, subsequent UV laser pulse to ionise the excited molecules. Ionisation detection of IR excitation has been coupled with a mass spectrometer thus adding a second dimension to optical spectroscopy. In another class of experiments, the extreme sensitivity of cavity-ring-down (CRD) spectroscopy (effective absorption path lengths of several km) is combined with the very high resolution of continuous wave (cw) diode lasers (100 kHz). This technique has been applied to measure accurately the transition strengths and weak overtone transitions of molecules (nitrous oxide, methane) and of hydrogen-bonded clusters (HF dimer).

So far in Sheffield, I have studied molecular association by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and high-level quantum-chemical calculations. For this purpose, I set up a very sensitive stimulated Raman experiment with photoacoustic detection ('PARS'). Among the intermolecular forces, the hydrogen-bond X-H...Y is particularly relevant. A hydrogen bond usually exhibits a characteristic 'red'-shift (shift to lower wavenumbers) of the X-H stretching vibration, but more unconventional 'blue'-shifting hydrogen bonds also occur and have become a hot topic of current research. In Sheffield, I have recently studied some unusual, "blue-shifting" hydrogen bonds (e.g., CHCl3...SO2 in the gas phase and open HCOOH structures in liquid formic acid) by theory and experiment.