Research Ethics & Integrity Training (Compulsory)

Although the majority of the DDP is individually tailored, ALL research students undertake the research ethics & integrity training module provided by their Faculty. Good research practices are fundamental to good research, and it is essential for every researcher to understand how to conduct their research ethically, and with integrity. Each Faculty runs a module that has been tailored to the needs of its own research students, and each student will be automatically registred to attend. For further course details click on your Faculty below.

Off-campus/part-time researchers – If you are unable to attend the face-to-face classes, you must contact the appropriate module provider to enquire if it is possible to complete this course online.

Module Providers:

Faculty of Arts & Humanities – Dr Louise Johnson – P.L.Johnson@sheffield.ac.uk
Faculty of Engineering – Eunice Lawton (e.lawton@sheffield.ac.uk)
Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health – Mrs Carol Fidler (c.fidler@sheffield.ac.uk)
Faculty of Science – Dr Emily Goodall (e.goodall@sheffield.ac.uk)
Faculty of Social Sciences – Dr Kate Reed – k.reed@sheffield.ac.uk

Arts & Humanities

Unit Code: FCA6100

Unit Title: Research Ethics and Integrity – Faculty of Arts & Humanities

Staff Contact: Dr Louise Johnson – P.L.Johnson@sheffield.ac.uk

Open to: First & Second Year of Research in the Faculty of Arts & Humanities

All postgraduate researchers at the University of Sheffield are required to complete the module FCA6100 Research Ethics and Integrity as a compulsory component of their studies. This is a core part of your introductory training and you cannot be awarded your PhD until you have passed this course. You should normally complete the module within the first nine months of your registration, in advance of your Confirmation Review.

Our research ethics training is delivered online. This enables you to complete the course at your own pace and at a time to suit you. The module is provided by Epigeum and has been tailor-made to the needs and interests of Arts and Humanities researchers. The course is now open to students and you should follow the instruction below to register and get started with your training as soon as possible:

• Go to <https://impact.epigeum.com>
• Complete the registration process according to the instructions provided. Please note: you should use your University of Sheffield email address for your registration.
• You will be asked for an access token during the registration process. The token needed is: e84ae294
• Once you have registered, you will be sent an activation email. If this does not arrive, please check your SPAM email. The email will have been sent from technical@epigeum.com.
• Once your account is activated, log in (using your registered email address as your username) and you will be shown the courses available. Please choose: Research Integrity (INT version) (N.B. Not the 'Concise' version)
• Select the course at the top of the list: Research Integrity - Arts and Humanities (300 minutes)
The module should take around 5 hours in total to complete. You can do this at a pace to suit and you must pass the Course Quiz in Part 6 of the module to complete the course successfully. Once you have finished, you can print off or save your certificate and you should retain a copy of this as part of your records of your progress through the Doctoral Development Programme. You can show your certificate to your examiners at your Confirmation Review meeting as proof of your successful completion of FCA6100 Research Ethics and Integrity. Your progress through the module will also be logged automatically with the Arts and Humanities Doctoral Development team.

N.B. You can attempt the Course Quiz as many times as is necessary to obtain a pass.

Engineering

Unit Code: FCE6100
Unit Title: Profession​al Behaviour and Ethical Conduct – Faculty of Engineering
Staff Contacts: Eunice Lawton

Contact for queries: Eunice Lawton (e.lawton@sheffield.ac.uk)
Open To: First and Second Year of Research – Faculty of Engineering
Semester Taught: Graduate Year

What is the module about?

Ethical integrity is an important part of your role as a researcher. Our Professional Behaviour and Ethical Conduct module will help heighten your ethical sensitivity and develop your awareness about where each course of action could take you.

The University takes ethical conduct seriously which is why the module is compulsory and one that all PGR students must complete.* The module is part of the Doctoral Development Programme (DDP) and will help you reflect on your own ethical behaviour and gain an understanding about issues facing today’s researchers. It will also give you the opportunity to examine and debate different scenarios.

*CDTs may offer their own bespoke ethics training

Why must I take the module?

This module is compulsory. It is essential that you understand, and can apply ethical judgement and know where to find guidance. Professionalism and the ability to assess the outcome of your actions are an important part of being a researcher which is why we provide this specialist training. Your ethical integrity will also be important to future employees.

The Nuffield Report found that 58% of scientists felt tempted or under pressure to compromise on research integrity and standards.
http://nuffieldbioethics.org/wp-content/uploads/Nuffield_research_culture_short_report_web.pdf

How do I register for the module?

The course is provided throughout the year with Introductory Lecture available via LMS.

How is the module delivered?

To complete the module you will need to undertake all of the following sections:

2 hour Introductory Lecture to inspire interest and encourage independent learning. The importance and relevance of the training will be conveyed and key concepts introduced.
The online Epigeum course - "Research Ethics and Integrity - Engineering"
The online assessment of the Epigeum course - 80% pass is required
An online Evaluation and Self Assessment that will be made available via Googledocs after you have attended the Introductory Lecture.

How do I access the online course ?

To access the Epigeum Impact System containing the Research Integrity course, please do the following:
- Go to https://impact.epigeum.com
- Complete registration. You will be asked for an access token. The token needed is: 13a86f68
- You will be sent an activation email. If this does not arrive, please check your SPAM email. The
email will have been sent from technical@epigeum.com
- Once the account is activated, log in and you will be shown the course programs available. Please
Choose:
-Research Integrity (UK version) (or the Concise (core) version but you might want to check the full course later in your PhD if you have queries.)

-Research Ethics and Integrity - Engineering

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What happens if I do not complete it in my first year?

If you do not complete it in the first year you will be added to the attendees for the next year's course and attend with the first years.

It is only exceptional cases that students will be allowed to attend in their third year.

Please note the awarding of your PhD will be withheld if you have not completed this course.

What if I am a part time or remote student?

Please contact Eunice Lawton to discuss alternative arrangements either by email e.lawton@sheffield.ac.uk or by phone x22164

I have completed the module but this is not shown in my student record, what should I do?

You need to contact whoever organised the course originally. For courses organised by Eunice Lawton please email her e.lawton@sheffield.ac.uk with details of your student number and the dates attended.

Medicine, Dentistry & Health

Unit Code: FCM6100
Unit Title: Research Ethics and Integrity- Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health

Module Leads: Dr Pirashanthie Vivekananda-Schmidt (p.vivekananda-schmidt@sheffield.ac.uk) and Dr Francois Guesdon (f.a.guesdon@sheffield.ac.uk)
Administrator: Mrs Carol Fidler (c.fidler@sheffield.ac.uk)
Open To: First Year of Research – Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health
Semester Taught: Graduate Year

Teaching Methods:

Introductory Lecture: To inspire interest and encourage independent learning; to convey the importance and relevance of the training; to introduce key concepts (face-to-face lecture or online lecture)

Sessions 1-4 (2 hours each): To help PGRs to become reflective practitioners by actively discussing the concepts of ethics and integrity through the consideration of six case studies, and then by applying these concepts to their own research. PGRs will also be encourage to bring examples of challenges they have come across in their own research for discussion.

Assessments:

This module contains three key stages.
(1) Attend the introductory lecture which is also available in MOLE2
(2) Attend the four small group meetings with your allocated facilitator
(3) Write four reflective entries which should be uploaded to PebblePad. The facilitator will confirm if the reflective entries are deemed of sufficient quality using the online assessment proforma on Mole as a guide.

If, due to exceptional circumstances, a student misses one session they will be expected to write an extra reflective entry. If students fail to attend the four sessions, their confirmation review will be delayed since confirmation is dependent on completion of this module.

Full Description:

By bringing together students from different departments and research areas, the training will provide opportunities for students to meet with and discuss professional and ethical challenges that is not limited to one’s own research area but addresses a wide range of relevant issues that is relevant to future development as research leaders.

Aims/Objectives:

The key aims of the training are:

1.To encourage PGR students to critically analyse/reflect on their own actions and behaviours in conducting research and in their interactions with research participants, supervisors, co-workers etc.
2.To heighten PGR students’ ethical sensitivity and reasoning, enabling them to plan and prepare for challenges they may face and to be able manage challenges in an ethical way (ethical sensitivity is about developing an awareness of the potential consequences of actions and being aware of alternative courses of action, whereas ethical reasoning is about developing a morally defensible argument of pursuing a particular course of action).

This includes:
• heightening sensitivity of one’s own ethical outlook, while also broadening understanding of the cultures and norms that influence the outlooks of others
• heightening sensitivity so that in practice PGR students are able to better plan and prepare for managing ethical challenges and morally grey areas
• heightening sensitivity so that in practice PGR students are able to achieve individual goals in the group context (e.g. in order to be able to do research together effectively there is a need to know how to reconcile the potential tension between research as a collective, supportive enterprise and research as an individualistic/self-centred pursuit).
Learning Outcomes

Through reflecting on/critically analysing their own and others’ behaviours and actions students should gain (through application) a range of key skills for research including:

• being able to justify and defend the ethical management (design, data collection etc) of their research (e.g. to a viva panel; to an ethics committee)
• being able to navigate any legal and regulatory requirements affecting their research
• being an independent learner
• being better prepared to manage challenges in their research
• becoming ‘professionally socialised’ within their own research discipline and within the Western higher education context.

Students should also gain key transferable skills useful in any career, helping them to become a more rounded individual, including:

• analytical and critical thinking
• how to work together effectively
• developing the confidence to help them ‘walk the talk’ (i.e. sticking to one’s principles, being able to make fully informed judgements and take appropriate actions etc.)
• being self-aware and knowing when to ask for advice.
Extra Information

Although the majority of the DDP is individually tailored, all new research students are expected to undertake the research integrity and ethics training module provided by their Faculty, and will be automatically registered. Good research practices are fundamental to good research, and it is essential for every researcher to understand how to conduct their research ethically, and with integrity.

Students could be exempt from the module if they have already had suitable experience of research ethics and integrity training as part of previous postgraduate studies or as part of other professional training. This does not include clinical ethics training and no partial exemptions will be permitted (i.e. no reduction of the number of attendances or reflections required). Students should provide a short explanation (150 words) of the course they have taken and provide supporting evidence, such as transcripts.

Exemption criteria:
1. The course must have consisted of a minimum of eight hours of contact time and a total of 12 hours of study including the contact time
2. At least four key research ethics areas were addressed during the applicant’s study (examples could include issues of consent and confidentiality, animal research, authorship and data/professional integrity or responsibilities)
3. Exemptions will only be considered if the training had been at postgraduate level or as part of other professional training.
For further guidance and time-table information click here.

Science

Unit Code:

FCP6101 – Research Professionalism and Integrity Induction
FCP6102 – Research Professionalism and Integrity 1
FCP6103 – Research Professionalism and Integrity 2

Unit Title: Research Professionalism and Integrity – Faculty of Science

Staff Contact: Dr Emily Goodall (e.goodall@sheffield.ac.uk)
Open To: First and Second Year or Research – Faculty of Science
Semester Taught: Graduate Year

Click on the links below for more information:

Social Sciences

Unit Code: FCS6100
Unit Title: Research Ethics and Integrity – Faculty of Social Sciences
Staff Contacts: Dr Kate Reed (k.reed@sheffield.ac.uk)
Open To: First and Second Year of Research – Faculty of Social Sciences
Semester Taught: Graduate Year (Introductory Lecture in Autumn follow on workshop in Spring)

Teaching Methods:

The below sets out the broad framework for the training:

Step 1 (Semester 1 of Year 1): Introductory lecture to inspire interest and encourage independent learning; to convey the importance and relevance of the training; to introduce key concepts (face-to-face lecture or online lecture)

Step 2 (Semester 2 of Year 1): Action Learning Sets to help PGRs to become reflective practitioners who are discussing the concepts of ethics/integrity actively through consideration of case studies and examples, and then applying these concepts to their own research (facilitated group discussion sessions involving 10-15 PGRs – face to face or online)

Step 3 (on completion of Step 2): Personal Review of Experiences – PGRs complete a self-assessment form about competency in ethical sensitivity and reasoning and in specific topics. PGRs discuss this with their supervisor and add the form to the e-portfolio.

Assessments:

There will be no formal assessment – Step 3 of the training involves a self-assessment process, where students will be encouraged through completion of a form to consider what they have learned and what skills they have gained. This will be discussed with the Supervisor and recorded in the student’s DDP e-portfolio.

Full Description:

Training on research ethics & integrity for all postgraduate research students as part of the Doctoral Development Programme. The training will:

Enhance students’ ability to critically analyse/reflect upon their own actions and behaviours when conducting research from start to finish, as well as interactions with research participants, supervisors, co-workers etc;
Heighten ethical sensitivity and reasoning, enabling students to plan and prepare for ethical challenges they may face and to be able to manage challenges.
The training will complement and reinforce existing research methods training.

Aims/Objectives

The key aims of the training are:

To encourage PGR students to critically analyse/reflect on their own actions and behaviours in conducting research and in their interactions with research participants, supervisors, co-workers etc;
To heighten PGR students’ ethical sensitivity and reasoning, enabling them to plan and prepare for challenges they may face and to be able manage challenges in an ethical way (ethical sensitivity is about developing an awareness of the potential consequences of actions and being aware of alternative courses of action, whereas ethical reasoning is about developing a morally defensible argument of pursuing a particular course of action).

Learning Outcomes:

Through reflecting on/critically analysing their own and others’ behaviours and actions students should gain (through application) a range of key skills for research.

Step 1 (Semester 1 of Year 1 ): Introductory lecture to inspire interest and encourage independent learning; to convey the importance and relevance of the training; to introduce key concepts (face-to-face lecture or online lecture)

Step 2 (Semester 2 of Year 1): Action Learning Sets (Phase 1) to help PGRs to become reflective practitioners who are discussing the concepts of ethics/integrity actively through consideration of case studies and examples, and then applying these concepts to their own research (facilitated group discussion sessions involving 10-15 PGRs face to face or online)

Step 3 (on completion of Step 2): Personal Review of Experiences – PGRs complete a self-assessment form about competency in ethical sensitivity and reasoning and in specific topics. PGRs discuss this with their supervisor and add the form to the e-portfolio.

Extra Information:

Although the majority of the DDP is individually tailored, ALL new research students are expected to undertake the research integrity and ethics training module provided by their Faculty, and will be automatically registered. Good research practices are fundamental to good research, and it is essential for every researcher to understand how to conduct their research ethically, and with integrity.

Credits

These courses were/are

Devised by: Professor Dawn Hadley (A&H), Dr Nadine Wills (LeTS), Professor Joan Beal (A&H), Dr Martin Foster (Eng), Dr Jennifer Burr (MDH), Dr Sandrine Soubes (Sci), Dr Kathy Boxall (Soc Sci), Dr Mark Taylor (Soc Sci), Ibtissam Al-Farah (PGR), Jon Higham (PGR), Mr Richard Hudson (R&IS), and Lindsay Unwin (R&IS).

Developed by: Professor Joan Beal (A&H), Dr Daniela Romano (Eng), Dr Pirashanthie Vivekananda-Schmidt (MDH), Dr Francois Guesdon (MDH), Dr Jessica Meade (Sci), Dr Simon Warren (Soc Sci), Dr Stephen Walker (Soc Sci), Dr Ruth Stirton (Soc Sci)

Delivered by:

Arts & Humanities – Dr Louise Johnson
Engineering – Ms Eunice Lawton
Medicine, Dentistry & Health – Dr Pirashanthie Vivekananda-Schmidt and Dr Francois Guesdon
Science – Dr Emily Goodall
Social Sciences – Dr Kate Reed