HAR6216: Molecular Nutrition

The Molecular Nutrition module is led by Peter Grabowski. It runs in the Spring semester and is worth 15 credits.


Overview

The Molecular Nutrition module is led by Peter Grabowski. It runs in the Spring semester and is worth 15 credits.

It is one of the modules on:

This module is available as a CPD option

This module is available as a DDP module


Introduction

This module aims to

  1. Introduce masters level students of nutrition to essential concepts in cell and molecular biology;
  2. Provide students with an understanding of genome wide influences of diet and nutrition and the time-dependent responses of the transcriptome, proteome and metabolome to nutrients and diet;
  3. Demonstrate how molecular biological methods are applied to study nutrient effects on the transcriptome, proteome and metabolome in cell-based and animal-based experiments; and
  4. Provide students with practice in the application of bioinformatics approaches to study molecular nutrition.


Objectives

This unit aims:

  1. To introduce masters level students of nutrition to essential concepts in cell and molecular biology
  2. To provide students with an understanding of genome wide influences of diet and nutrition and the time-dependent responses of the transcriptome, proteome and metabolome to nutrients and diet
  3. To ddemonstrate how molecular biological methods are applied to study nutrient effects on the transcriptome, proteome and metabolome in cell-based and animal-based experiments
  4. To provide students with practice in the application of bioinformatics approaches to study molecular nutrition


Learning outcomes

By the end of the unit, the candidate will be able to:

  1. Describe the structure and function of mammalian cells, their organelles, cytoskeletal structures, components of the plasma membrane and nucleus and discuss the role of nutrients and diet in their production and function
  2. Describe key cellular processes including the cell cycle, DNA replication and its regulation, gene transcription, translation, apoptosis and autophagy, and describe the effects of nutrients on these processes
  3. Describe and discuss molecular mechanisms by which nutrients and diet influence the transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome.
  4. Discuss genome wide influences of diet and nutrition and the time dependent responses of the transcriptome, proteome and metabolome to nutrients and diet
  5. Describe the application of common laboratory methods in the study of the effects of nutrients on the transcriptome, proteome and metabolome
  6. Apply bioinformatics approaches to study molecular nutrition


Core competencies

The module covers core competencies required for accreditation of the MSc in Human Nutrition by the Association for Nutrition (AfN).

This module addresses in depth the following AfN core competencies:
CC1a, CC1b, CC1e, CC1h, CC1k, CC1n, CC1o, CC2d, CC3c, CC4c, CC4g

The module supports the learning of knowledge and acquisition of skills relating to aspects of the following AfN core competencies:
CC1c, CC1f, CC1j, CC1q, CC2c, CC4f, CC4h, CC5e, CC5g


Teaching methods

Learning outcomes 1 to 4 will be delivered by a series of lectures and tutorials, supplemented with resources in MOLE to guide self-study and allowing students 24/7 access to learning materials.

Learning outcome 5 will be delivered through methods-focused tutorials and a workshop, led by tutors with practical experience. Students will be provided with opportunities to visit research laboratories with tutors to experience the application of the methods.

Learning outcome 6 will be delivered through a series of bioinformatics workshops in a computer laboratory, in which students will be introduced to databases and bioinformatics software. They will undertake exercises to search databases, run software, simulate/model a metabolic process and explore the perturbation of a model process to make predictions concerning the effects of a specific nutrient in the model system assessed through coursework.

 

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    Information last updated: 8 October 2021


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