Evaluating the Diversion of Alcohol-Related Attendances (EDARA)

This project will evaluate the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, efficiency and acceptability of Alcohol Intoxication Management Services (AIMS) in managing alcohol-related Emergency Departments’ attendances. AIMS are designed to receive, treat and monitor intoxicated patients who would normally attend Emergency Departments and to lessen the burden that alcohol-misuse places on unscheduled care.

They are usually located close to areas characterised by excessive intoxication and are open at times when levels of intoxication peak (eg Friday and Saturday evenings). AIMS therefore offer the potential to mitigate some of the pressures on Emergency Departments as well as ambulance services and the police at times when there is a sustained increase in demand.

Project Aims

The project aims to:

  • Explore barriers and facilitators of AIMS implementation from the perspective of frontline staff by examining the impact of AIMS on the frontline work setting and on practitioners’ working lives
  • Identify the key ingredients required for successful implementation of AIMS in order to lead on the co-production of guidance on AIMS development and implementation
  • Establish the acceptability of AIMS to users
  • Investigate how the implementation of AIMS affect Emergency Departments users’ experience
  • Determine the effect of AIMS implementation on key performance indicators across health and ambulance services
  • Consider secondary effects of AIMS implementation such as ambulance response times and reduction in violent assaults through increased police presence
  • Identify set-up and running costs for AIMS, resolve costs by sector (health, ambulance and police), before, during and after AIMS setup, and quantify AIMS benefits in order to establish the cost-effectiveness of AIMS

Funding

The project is funded by National Institute for Health Research Health Services and Delivery Research Programme. It started in January 2016 and will run for 30 months with £925,000 funding.

Investigators

Principal Investigator

Professor Simon Moore, School of Dentistry, Cardiff University

Co-Investigators

Professor Davina Allen, School of Healthcare Sciences, Cardiff University

Professor Petra Meier, School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield

Professor Steve Goodacre, School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield

Professor Alan Brennan, School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield

Professor Alicia O’Cathain, School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield

Dr Vaseekaran Sivarajasingam, School of Dentistry, Cardiff University

Professor Jonathan Shepherd, School of Dentistry, Cardiff University

Dr Tracey Young, School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield

Andy Irving, School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield

Dr Penny F Buykx, School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield

Project Managers

Andy Irving, School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield

Dr Yu-Chiao Wang, School of Dentistry, Cardiff University

Staff

Clare Olson, Administrative Assistant, School of Dentistry, Cardiff University

Joanne Blake, Research Associate, School of Healthcare Sciences, Cardiff University

Project Contact

Professor Simon Moore, School of Dentistry, Cardiff University

email: mooresc2@cardiff.ac.uk

Telephone: +44 (0)29 2074 4246