Professor Angela CoxProfessor Angela Cox BA, PhD

Professor of Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, YCR Institute for Cancer Studies, Department of Oncology
Tel: +44 (0)114 271 2373 | Fax: +44 (0)114 271 1602 | Email: a.cox@sheffield.ac.uk

Link: www.shef.ac.uk/oncology/staffprofiles/acox

Statistical genetics and genetic epidemiology of cancers

Angie graduated from the University of Cambridge in 1983 with a degree in Natural Sciences (genetics) and went on to do a biochemistry PhD at University College London whilst based at the biotechnology company Celltech Ltd. She joined the University of Sheffield in 1992, working on the genetic analysis of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

In 2000 she took up a lectureship post in the Institute for Cancer Studies (now part of the Sheffield Cancer Centre). Her main interest is the use of statistical genetics and genetic epidemiology to identify genes that may be important susceptibility or survival factors for various common cancers. Ongoing studies identify genes that are important in a number of common cancers including breast, prostate and colon cancer, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and melanoma skin cancer. Since these involve cancer patients, Angie’s research nurse Helen Cramp is at the front line, meeting with patients and providing information about our studies. She also liaises closely with our database manager Dan Connley.

In Angie’s group, post-doctoral staff Sushila Rigas and Wei-Yu Lin carry out the laboratory and statistical work with the aid of technician Ian Brock. Dr Lucy Walkington has recently been appointed to one of the new clinical fellowships linked to the Sheffield Cancer Centre, and she will work on melanoma in collaboration with Dr Sarah Danson in Clinical Oncology. We participate in various international consortia working on common cancers. The aim of these large collaborations is to pool data for analysis, thus allowing us to verify observations in very large population samples of cancer cases from around the world. Our funders include Cancer Research UK, Yorkshire Cancer Research, Breast Cancer Campaign, and National Cancer Institute (USA).

Selected publications:

1. Camp, NJ, Parry, P, et al., and Cox, A (2012) Fine-mapping CASP8 risk variants in Breast Cancer. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention 21: 176–81.
2. Lin, W-Y, Camp, NJ, et al., and Cox, A (2011). A role for XRCC2 gene polymorphisms in breast cancer risk and survival. J Med Genet 48: 477–484.
3. Blows FM, Driver KE, et al., (2010). Subtyping of Breast Cancer by Immunohistochemistry to Investigate a Relationship between Subtype and Short and Long Term Survival: A Collaborative Analysis of Data for 10,159 Cases from 12 Studies. PLoS Med 7, e1000279.