Natalie WotherspoonPhoto of Natalie Wotherspoon

BSc Sociology, London School of Economics
MSc Health and Society, King's College London

E-mail address: Nwotherspoon1@sheffield.ac.uk

Thesis title / scope of research

My research looks at how people with ME/ CFS (myalgic encephalomyelitis/ chronic fatigue syndrome) experience their diagnosis.

Research interests

  • Sociology of health, illness and medicine
  • Sociology of diagnosis
  • Health-related behaviour
  • History of health and medicine
  • Sociological theory

Supervisor(s):

Dr Kate Reed and Professor Paul Martin

Awards and scholarships

  • Full University of Sheffield PhD Scholarship
  • LSE Bank of America Merrill Lynch Access to Education Scholarship

Papers, publications and presentations

  • Wotherspoon, N. (2015) ‘Book review “Social Issues in Diagnosis: An Introduction for Clinicians and Students”, “Edited by Jutel, A. G. and Dew, K.”’, Sociology of Health & Illness, (forthcoming Sept 2015)
  • (April 2014) BSA MedSoc Early Career Researcher Conference, Cardiff University ‘Research proposal: How do people with ME/CFS experience their diagnosis?’
  • (September 2014) BSA MedSoc Conference, Aston University, ‘How do people with ME/CFS experience their diagnosis as both a process and a label?’
  • (January 2015) Yorkshire Medical Sociology Conference, 24th February 2014, ‘’How do people with ME/CFS experience their diagnosis as both a process and a label?’
  • (March 2015) University of Sheffield, Science and Technology Studies Research Seminar, ‘Experiences of CFS/ME: Diagnosis as a label and a process’
  • (May 2015) LSHTM, Sociology of Diagnosis PGR Workshop, ‘Abstract: Experiences of CFS/ME: Diagnosis as a label and a process’

Other experience

Natalie’s previous work experience includes healthcare communications, Goldman Sachs and the House of Commons.

  • Organising Committee of ‘Gender and Disability: Asking Difficult Questions’, 10th May 2014, ICOSS, University of Sheffield, UK
  • Organising Committee of ‘Considering Contributions, Considering Change’, Postgraduate Conference, 25th June 2014, University of Sheffield, UK